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  • Wuhai Internets.

  • Welcome back to our weekly live stream.

  • My name is Alicia, and today we're going to talk about Brazel verbs for the office.

  • Many of you have asked me to teach lessons about phrase little birds.

  • So today I'm going to do a lesson.

  • And we're going to learn a lot of different brazel verbs that you can use at work that stool in meeting situations in situations where you use a computer, whatever.

  • So not just for work, not just for the office, but hopefully that you can use in a few different ways in your everyday life.

  • So as you join, please don't forget to like and share the video with thumbs up button on and share so that other learners confined this week's lesson.

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  • As always, I have two announcements.

  • One.

  • I shared this picture a couple months ago.

  • Maybe.

  • I don't know.

  • Anyway, this is the culture video that we released on our YouTube channel, the English Class 101 YouTube channel a couple months ago and I mentioned in last week's live stream.

  • The next one in this series will be out soon.

  • So I'm excited to say we're excited to say the next video will be up tomorrow.

  • Tomorrow.

  • So, like, uh, you need a little over 24 hours from this live stream.

  • So please watch the next culture video on the English class 101 YouTube channel and send us your comments in the comments section are really excited to share that, and version three will follow the leads.

  • Okay, so that's announcement one.

  • Announcement number two is a video version today.

  • So, um, regarding this thing the's free pdf lessons.

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  • So this quick videos just showing you if you long into the website, go to this page and scroll down to choose whichever pdf you want, Then hit the download button, you'll find it just like this, so it'll look like this.

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  • That is everything for announcements.

  • I see many people in the chat now.

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  • Hello, everybody.

  • Thank you very much for joining us.

  • I see Marcello and Joel and Christian and Jasmine and Elizabeth and Abdullah and Harrison.

  • Hello.

  • On YouTube on Facebook, I see Jamal and Kong and Han and Ahmet and Prince Skies.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • Marcella as well.

  • Great.

  • There are many people here.

  • I'm going to share the video and then I am going to start the lesson.

  • So today's lesson I made again, As usual in three parts, we're going to focus on vocabulary like specific situation vocabulary for each for each part of today's lesson.

  • So the first part, or the first like group of phrase a ll verbs I want to look at for today is this.

  • These are phrase all of herbs you can use for every day.

  • Office activities.

  • So yes, I have everyday office activities.

  • But some of these you can use for other parts of your life too.

  • So I'll mention those throughout the lesson.

  • Let's get started.

  • Okay.

  • First the first.

  • If this is actually two different phrases verbs first is to clock in to clock in second is to clock out.

  • So to clock in and to clock out those air to separate freezer verbs to clock in to clock in means to record your start time to record your starts time.

  • So this means when you arrive at the office, you record when you begin work.

  • So maybe you use like a digital system to record.

  • When you start your office hours.

  • That's called Clocking in.

  • Use the phrase over to clock in.

  • So in a sentence clock in when you get to the office.

  • So clock is right here walking.

  • This is like a rule or a command.

  • So clock in when you get to the office, So the opposite, then, is this one to clock out to clock out?

  • So maybe you can guess to clock out means to record your end time to record your end time or to record the time you stop working to clock out to clock out.

  • So in a sentence clock out when you leave So clock in when you get to the office clock out when you leave or clock out when you finish work clock in and clock out a very basic office related foot Fraser fir.

  • Okay, let's move on to the next one.

  • Then the next one is to set up to set up.

  • Please note that for this phrase, over there is a space.

  • There's a space between set and up.

  • Set up with no space is a noun to set up that's a phrase overt.

  • So keep this face there when you're making this a verb, so to set up one's desk or work stations.

  • So maybe you have a desk at your office or at your school.

  • Or maybe you have just kind of, ah, work station.

  • Maybe it's not exactly a desk.

  • You could use work station, too.

  • So to set up means to prepare something so like to get something ready.

  • For example, let's set up work stations for the new staff, so let's set up workstations.

  • We follow this set up with work station or with desk.

  • Like, I need to set up my desk for the day as typically.

  • How we use it phrase over.

  • Okay, uh, and it totally says Now I understand what was written on my work clock.

  • He had this probably clock and the clock out phrases written on a lot of office clocks, I think, Uh, okay, let's move on, then.

  • To the next one.

  • To skip out on to skip out on.

  • This is one that you can use in situations outside of the office to skip out on means to not attend something on purpose.

  • Like you decide.

  • I don't have time for this meeting, or I said I would go to this event, but I decided not to go.

  • So we used the expression to skip out on to skip out on this.

  • Sounds rather casual.

  • So we do not use this in formal situations, but you might use this with your colleagues with your clothes co workers to skip.

  • Just give it time, for example.

  • I'm gonna skip out on the afternoon meeting today.

  • I'm going to skip out on the afternoon meeting today.

  • So Skip out on and then what thing?

  • What event did you choose not to attend in this case, the afternoon meeting.

  • I'm gonna skip out on the afternoon meeting today.

  • OK, onward then.

  • We've got three more in this first group, so this one is to head out to head out.

  • You can use this in AA lot of different cases, not just at the office, Not just at work.

  • To head out means to leave to leave.

  • So this has no, like, no relationship to your head, your physical head.

  • So to head out means to leave, for example, it's late.

  • I'm gonna head out.

  • I'm gonna head out.

  • So replace leave or maybe go with head out.

  • Okay, a question.

  • Until says, Is it correct to say, Help me to set my desk up?

  • Yeah, that's fine.

  • That's fine.

  • So about this one here to set up?

  • Yes.

  • You can split that.

  • So help me set my desk up is okay.

  • That's all right.

  • Okay.

  • Katie on Facebook says I always skip out on university classes.

  • Really?

  • That's a good thing they are you paying for those?

  • OK, onward to next one.

  • The next one here.

  • This'll next one is super useful at work and at school.

  • It is to hand in to hand in to hand in means to submit.

  • So this expression comes from this motion like when you submit a report or you submit your homework.

  • This is kind of emotion Yacht, like our before digital stuff, I guess.

  • But we used this motion So it's like your hand moved in towards another person.

  • So we use the phrase a ll burb to hand in to hand in to mean to submit something.

  • For example, past tense, I handed in my report At the end of the day, I handed in my report.

  • So what did you hand in?

  • This is the thing that you handed him.

  • I handed in no phrase I handed in my report at the end.

  • Okay, last one for this first group then is to call in to call in, especially to call in sick to call in sick.

  • This expression this phrase over means to contact your office or to contact your school to tell them you are not coming to work today because you're sick or to tell them you're sick.

  • Usually for example, I have to call in sick today.

  • I have to call in sick today So this is like when we were at home.

  • We pick up the phone and we call into the office is kind of the idea our communication goes into the office.

  • That's sort of how you can imagine this.

  • What was that call in sick call in sick.

  • We typically don't use another adjective here.

  • We don't say I'm going to call in tired or I'm going to call in happy or something we use.

  • I'm going to call in sick.

  • This means I'm not coming to the office today because I am okay, uh, of sec.

  • Hello there on YouTube Says when we are about to leave the office in the evening, How should we save?

  • What should we say?

  • OK, you can say to your close colleagues, you can use this expression.

  • I introduced this.

  • I'm gonna head out.