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  • so I think the best way to continue to walk you through the thinkers that we're

  • planning to cover is to do that with examples they stick better and they're

  • more interesting and it's very difficult to understand you outside of a narrative

  • context and so I'm going to walk you through the Lion King today how many of

  • you have seen the Lion King yes so how many of you haven't right okay so

  • so you obviously were raised in a box somewhere out in the middle of field so

  • anyways you know it's it's it's an amazingly popular animated movie I think

  • it was the most highest grossing animated movie ever made made until

  • frozen which I actually absolutely detested but the Lion King The Lion King

  • is actually consciously influenced by archetypes as well as unconsciously

  • influenced by them so it's a bit of a cheat I would say in some sense but it

  • doesn't I don't for the purposes that we're using it for I think it's just

  • fine and so partly what you might think about is that it's its relationship to

  • archetypal themes that made it so overwhelmingly popular it's same being

  • the case with say books and movies like Harry Potter or the entire Marvel series

  • the Marvel series is quite interesting I know somebody who wrote for Batman and

  • for Wolverine I know Batman he's into Marvel comic but one of the things that

  • he told me that was quite interesting was that once these characters take off

  • and establish a life of their own they have a backstory and which becomes part

  • of the mythology that's collectively held by the readers and if you you can

  • invent an alternative universe where you can muck about with the backstory but

  • otherwise you better stick with it or the readers are gonna write you and tell

  • you that you've got the story wrong and so there's a bit of a collaboration

  • between the writers and the readers after these things take on a life of

  • their own and so and of course the they they tend to the the comic books in

  • particular tend to tend towards mythological themes very very rapidly

  • and so anyways Carl Jung was a fascinating person I think

  • you can read his biography autobiography / biography which is called memories

  • dreams and reflections which in many ways I think is an unfortunate book

  • because it's usually the only book that people read that's that is more or less

  • by young but and it is more popular yet popularly accessible which is probably a

  • good thing but it's also it's not as rigorous as his other books and so the

  • problem with someone like Jung is you kind of have to read him as much as you

  • can in the original because interpreting him is not a very straightforward matter

  • he was a very visionary person by which I mean he had an incredible visual

  • imagination and he used that a lot he used it in his therapy practice I

  • believe that most of his therapy clients were high in trade openness I have a lot

  • of clients who are high in trade openness they kind of seek me out

  • because I'm high and trade openness and you know they watch my videos and that

  • sort of thing and they're interested in what I'm doing and many of them are

  • astute dreamers and prolific dreamers and many open people in my experience

  • have archetypal dreams whereas people who are lower in openness they either

  • don't dream at all or they don't remember their dreams as much or they're

  • not interested in them and they're not interested in the mythological

  • underpinnings of them so I've taught psychology roughly speaking to many

  • different types of people including lawyers and lawyers and physicians and

  • they tend to be higher in trade conscientiousness than in openness and

  • they're much more interested in the practical applications of psychology and

  • maybe the big five theories than they are in the narrative underpinnings and

  • you know people say that when they went to um-- they had union dreams but I

  • don't and then when they went to Freud they had Freudian dreams and I don't

  • really believe that's exactly true I think it was a matter of selection bias

  • a priori selection bias on the part of the people who were likely to go see

  • either of those two and so but I've been struck by some clients in particular how

  • unbelievably continually they can generate deep archetypal dreams with a

  • really coherent narrative structure it's really phenomenal and how revealing

  • those dreams our problem with archetypal dreams is that they're not really

  • personal right so if you're looking for a personal way out of a situation an

  • archetypal dream doesn't help you that much because it gives you the general

  • pattern rather than a specific solution to your problem

  • but a good dream will do both at once anyways yung was an astute student of

  • Freud's I will cover Freud next although generally and in personality courses the

  • the order is reversed Freud first menuing because of their temporal of the

  • temporal order of their thought but I think it's better to start with Jung

  • because it's it's as if you Freud excavated into the basement and then

  • Jung excavated into many many floors underneath the basement of the mind and

  • so from if you're transitioning from an archaic understanding of archaic modes

  • of thinking towards Freud it's better to go through young because Jung is I think

  • I think Freudian theory is a subset of Jungian Theory fundamentally just like

  • Newtonian physics is a subset of Einstein Ian's physics and I think that

  • Freud knew that even to some degree although he was very much opposed to any

  • sort of religious thinking or mythological religious thinking I would

  • say he was a real 19th century materialist and he didn't like the fact

  • that Jung's work started to delve into religious themes in a manner that

  • actually in some sense validated those themes and so that's actually why they

  • split they split when you published a book called symbols of transformation

  • Jung was also a deep student of Nietzsche Nietzsche wrote a book called

  • thus spake Zarathustra which is kind of an Old Testament revelation poetry kind

  • of book it's a strange one and I wouldn't recommend if you want to read

  • Nietzsche that you start with that one but most people do but you get a seminar

  • on thus spake Zarathustra which is about I've got this wrong it's somewhere

  • between 700 and 1100 pages long and it only covers the first third of the book

  • and thus spake Zarathustra is actually quite a short book and so well so you

  • can imagine how much you had to know about Nietzsche to derive that many

  • words out of that few words and Nietzsche was a well an absolute

  • absolute genius and Jung was actually trying to answer the question that

  • Nietzsche posed fundamentally which is why part of the reason why it's

  • incorrect historically to consider him a Freudian he was so nietzsche basically

  • stated let's say explicitly that scientific empiricism / rationalist

  • had resulted in the death of the mythological tradition of the west

  • roughly speaking that's Nietzsche's comment on the death of God and in that

  • comment he also said that the fact that God was dead was going to produce

  • tremendous idiy a tional and social historical upheavals that would result

  • in the deaths of millions of people that that he didn't say all that in one place

  • it's it's spread between part of its in will to power and and I can't remember

  • the source of the other one some of its referenced and thus spake Zarathustra

  • but Nietzsche believed that in order to overcome the collapse of traditional

  • values with the idea say of God as its cornerstone people would have to become

  • creatures that could produce their own values as a replacement that we would

  • have to become capable of generating autonomous values and Jung but but

  • that's easier said than done because trying to impose a set of values on

  • yourself is very difficult because you're not very cooperative and you know

  • that if you try to get yourself to do something that you don't want to do or

  • that's hard you just won't do it and so it's not like you can just invent your

  • own values and then go along with that that just doesn't work and so what Jung

  • and the Freudians did Freud first I would say was to start looking to be

  • looking into people's fantasies autonomous fantasies unconscious

  • fantasies to see if they could - and and discover that values bubbled up of their

  • own accord into those fantasies and you can imagine for example if you've become

  • enamored of someone that you might start fantasizing about them and if you read

  • off the fantasy then you can tell what you're after and what you're up to and

  • so the motivational force composes the fantasy and Freud was more interested

  • not in a personal sense so in in so far as your fantasies might reveal your

  • personal history so for example if you have a burst of negative emotion in the

  • clinical session there'll be a fantasy that goes along with that an association

  • of ideas that that that kind of manifest themselves of their own accord and

  • they're not necessarily coherent and logical they're linked by emotion that's

  • the free association technique in Freudian psychology and they also might

  • manifest themselves in dreams and fantasies and so Freud started doing the

  • analysis of these spontaneous let's call them fantasies and Jung link that more

  • at Freud did this first with the oedipal oedipal

  • complex but then you linked up spontaneous fantasies and dreams with

  • with myth mythology and fantasy across history and of course Piaget did the

  • same thing from a completely different standpoint so and that a lot of that's

  • embedded in this movie so we might as well just walk through it so the first

  • question might be well why is a lion a king right and because it makes sense to

  • people that a lion could be a king and of course a lion is an apex predator and

  • so which means it's at the top of the food chain roughly speaking and it's

  • sort of golden like the Sun so that's also useful and you know it has that

  • Mane that makes it look majestic and of course it's very physically powerful and

  • it's it's and and and it's intimidating and so it's something that you run away

  • from as well right or you're awestruck by so the fact that you know it's like

  • snail king just doesn't make any sense right but lion king that works and and

  • you got to think about those things because it's not self-evident why a lion

  • would work as a king but uh but a snail wouldn't but it fits in with the your

  • metaphorical understanding of the way the world works much better and so the

  • Lion King makes sense and well and when things like that that aren't rationally

  • self-evident makes sense you have to ask yourself in what metaphorical context do

  • they make sense so you have the Lion King now the movie opens with a sunrise

  • and the sunrise is equivalent to the dawn of consciousness so that in many

  • archaic stories the Sun was a hero like Horus if I remember correctly was a

  • solar king but but Apollo in particular but Apollo Greek Greek myth the idea was

  • that at the Sun was this was the the hero the hero who illuminated the sky in

  • the day and so heroism and illumination and enlightenment are all tangled

  • together metaphorically and then at night what would happen would be that

  • Sun would fight with the with the dragon of darkness basically or with evil all

  • night and then rise again victorious in the morning and so it's a death and

  • rebirth theme and it's very very very very common mythological theme and the

  • reason the Sun is associated with consciousness as far as I can tell is

  • that were not nocturnal creatures right we're awake during the day and we're

  • very very visual half our brain is devoted to visual processing and to be

  • lightened and illuminated means to develop to move towards a higher state

  • of consciousness and we naturally use light symbolism to to represent that you

  • know like the light bulb on the top of someone's head you know you don't say I

  • was in darkened when you learn something new and so again that fits into this

  • underlying metaphorical substrate that that's I think deeply biologically

  • grounded but but also social or socially grounded so it's a new day it's the

  • start of a new day and a day day actually means like French your name

  • means day the day trek in some sense and how to comport yourself during the day

  • is the fundamental question the day is the canonical unit of time and so you