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  • So, how are we going to do this?

  • Are people just going to ask?

  • All right.

  • Yes

  • "You have said that speech brings order out of chaos"

  • "That's why free speech is important"

  • "But why does it appear that speech brings chaos out of order?"

  • So you would ask that.

  • The question is...

  • *laughter*

  • The question is: Speech brings order out of chaos

  • --That's what I said--

  • but it appears that speech brings chaos out of order as well

  • and the answer to that is- it does.

  • There is only so many complications I can address in the talk simultaneously

  • umm.... if you look at

  • If you look at the most archaic of archetypal heroes

  • Those heroes confront something that represents chaos

  • It's usually a monster that bears a treasure of some sort

  • and that's a symbolic representation of the class of all unexplored things

  • because things that we have not yet explored are threatening and destructive

  • but also offer us infinite potential

  • but more elaborated hero stories, lets say

  • also reverse that and say that- well there are times when the order has become so corrupt and rigid

  • that free speech fragments it into its parts

  • so that it can rejuvenate itself

  • and so...

  • actually in the gospels

  • that's the hero that Christ is basically represented as

  • He's not so much the dragon confronting...the dragon slayer who gathers the treasure

  • Although that's implicit in the juxtaposition of Christ with the figure of like a serpentile satan

  • but Christ is the thing that stands up against the corrupt state

  • and rejuvenates it through speech

  • And so technically speaking

  • free speech- the logos is the thing that mediates between chaos and order

  • and you can think about

  • this is represented in many cultures- this idea

  • You can see it most specifically in the Taoist conceptualisation

  • because in the Taoist world, being is made out of chaos and order, yin and yang, masculine and feminine

  • fundamentally it's chaos and order

  • and order is the fact that wherever you go, there are things you understand

  • and chaos is- the fact that wherever you go, there are things that you don't understand

  • And so the idea is that being is made out of the things that you understand and the things that you don't understand

  • and it's always that way

  • which is why Tao is the symbol of being per se

  • and it's the case

  • Your brain is adapted in fact

  • it's partly why it has two hemispheres--

  • for the world that you understand, and the world you don't understand

  • the world you understand, roughly speaking, being handled by the left

  • the world you don't understand, roughly speaking, being handled by the right

  • Well it's that line down the middle that's Tao. That's meaning.

  • And if you have one foot in chaos and one foot in order, you're maximising information flow

  • and rejuvenating yourself at the same time that you're maintaining your structure

  • and you will report on that internally as engagement in the world.

  • It's the most fundamental orienting sense that you have.

  • and it's deeply instantiated neurologically--

  • unbelievably deeply.

  • And so it really is the case

  • from an evolutionary perspective

  • that reality is chaos and order.

  • It's that to which you're adapted.

  • And so sometimes you are speaking on behalf of chaos,

  • and sometimes you are speaking on behalf of order.

  • It's more complicated than that too, though, because...

  • when we have a dialogue, say,

  • and we're mutually attempting to climb towards the truth

  • instead of convincing each other that we're right...

  • then what we are doing is engaging in the simultaneous fragmentation of old and archaic belief systems,

  • and they're updated. And you can experience that--

  • because someone will say something that sets you back

  • and then you'll get what they're saying, and it will CLICK together.

  • And what you are experiencing is the death of an old conceptualisation structure

  • (its disintegration), and then its re-configuration in a tighter order.

  • And people love that. They live for that.

  • It's-- Really, it's what keeps you ALIVE.

  • And you can experience that in a deep conversation,

  • a truthful conversation, a meeting of the minds and soul.

  • And people love that. It's curative. All psychotherapists know this.

  • Because, what you do in psychotherapy, in addition to helping people face the things that they're most afraid of

  • so that they can overcome them

  • is to allow them to tell someone the truth.

  • "What happened to you? I'll listen..."

  • So they tell you.

  • And they take themselves apart, and put themselves together,

  • while they're speaking the truth about what happened.

  • And it puts them together.

  • The two fundamental elements of psychotherapy are...

  • Let's find what you're afraid of and avoiding,

  • and help you confront it,

  • so that you can gather the information that's there...

  • And... Let's allow you to lay your story out in all of its catastrophe and detail

  • so that you can straighten yourself out through speech.

  • It's exactly what happens in psychotherapy.

  • And it should happen in every real relationship.

  • It's the spiritual purpose of a marriage, fundamentally, right?

  • Because you face someone who's different than you, that you're tied to

  • --and cannot run from--and so... **laughter**

  • you can reveal yourself... Really, really... It's a critical--

  • It's a critical part of marriage. Because if you can run,

  • from someone they will never show you their true face.

  • Because if someone shows you their TRUE face... you WILL run.

  • And so you say in a marriage ceremony, "I will allow you to show me your true face, and I will not run."

  • And unless you mean that, you'll never be married.

  • You'll never understand what it means. And you'll never reap the benefits of it,

  • which are practical, obviously, but also spiritual and psychological.

  • There's a reason for the vow, but it HAS to be a vow.

  • 'Cause otherwise you have a back door open, and you'll never really tell the person what you're like.

  • And, and no bloody wonder, because really...

  • who really wants to know what you're like?

  • **laughter** Not even you... that's for sure.

  • So, I'm not surprised for...

  • I want to thank you, because what was surprising about your lecture today

  • was this concept of altruism. I think you were able to put everything together

  • and at the end come out with a higher value of altruism.

  • And, to me it was a surprise, you know .

  • And I have a relationship with altruism, and the one that I find that's difficult for me

  • is that there's an evolutionary process of my brain--

  • it's an organ, it's developed, you know?

  • And I'm amazed at how often I think of 3 people: me, myself and I.

  • To the point where I've actually written down--counted--all the iterations of "me, myself, and I"

  • in either my thoughts or my speech or even in someone else's

  • And you'll get a PAGE...

  • And sometimes we'll think of "we".

  • And as far as I've been able to ascertain, it's because I have to expend energy

  • to think about someone else.

  • And yet,

  • I'm adicted to ease and comfort

  • because my natural evolution is one of ease and comfort.

  • You hear it in Alcoholic's Anonymous, "Well, booze ain't the problem. You're addicted to ease and comfort."

  • How do I overcome my--

  • what I think is my sense of ease and comfort

  • to be able to make altruism a more natural state of being?

  • Jordan: Good, good-- Good question.

  • So, the question is-- the first was a comment about

  • the emphasis in my talk today on altruism

  • and the second is, "How do I--how do people overcome their proclivity to only act on their own behalf?"

  • OK, so ... the first thing I will say is that

  • I don't believe that what I spoke about today was in favor of altruism

  • And, that's not a negative comment on your question.

  • But there's ... So here's a primary religious injunction:

  • Treat the other person like you would like to be treated yourself.

  • That does not mean "be nice to other people".

  • It does not mean "sacrifice yourself excessively for other people".

  • It means... Think about the other person as if they were YOU,

  • and figure out how you can mutually interact to better both of you at the same time.

  • You have to build yourself into the equation.

  • It's an equation.

  • It's not that others are more valuable,

  • it's that we're ALL valuable. We're equally valuable.

  • And then you think "well, how do you remind yourself of that?"

  • And the answer to that is, through terror.

  • Because terror is the genuine motivator.

  • So they say--

  • "Fear of god is the beginning of all wisdom."

  • Well, what does that mean?

  • It means, first, that you don't get away with anything.

  • And it's really useful to know that, because if you really know that,

  • you won't TRY to get away with--

  • well, you still will--because people are stupid--but,

  • **laughter** but at least it will mitigate the possibility. So--

  • Here, I'll tell you something that Jung said. This is quite profound.

  • And I think it's the right answer to this question.

  • Yung believed-- He was interested in the emergence of higher morality.

  • --something the developmental psychologist Piaget was also interested in--

  • Piaget thought... we started out as individuals, then we learned to play games with other people.

  • Kids--children--learned how to play games with other children, and that made them social.

  • So, our society is a game, it's a giant game.