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  • Dragon is in orbit.

  • Capture.

  • You're looking at a live view of the space X launch site at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

  • You can see the Falcon nine rocket with the Dragon Sierra's two spacecraft sitting on top waiting.

  • Launch in just under 40 minutes from now.

  • Welcome.

  • And thanks for joining us.

  • I'm Kiko Dodge of a spacecraft engineer here at Space Sex Webcasting.

  • You live from Space six Headquarters Beautiful Hawthorne, California, where you design and build the Falcon nine Rocket and Dragon spacecraft.

  • Today we're located high above are composites manufacturing room right near Space X Mission Control.

  • This launch should be the fifth flight of the Falcon nine rocket and the second Dragon Resupply mission for NASA.

  • Now, just over four months ago, in October 2012 R Dragon spacecraft performed its second visit to the space station and the first ever commercial cargo delivery.

  • Now today's launch will deliver more cargo and more science experiments.

  • And in addition, we're playing to stay in orbit for as long as 25 days to support these experiments.

  • The end of the Mission Dragon will return cargo in experiments to Earth splashing down in the Pacific Ocean just off the coast of Southern California.

  • Now I'm the newcomer to the Webcast programs.

  • Let me introduce my two co host.

  • First, we have John Innsbruck, product director for Falcon nine Launch Vehicle program.

  • Good Morning, Kiko and welcome to the Webcast team.

  • As you mentioned today, will be the fifth Falcon nine launch for Space six.

  • It's been an exciting seven plus years since we started the Falcon nine program, and I've had the opportunity to be part of it.

  • For the 6.5 years I've worked at Space X, today's launch is from our Cape can ever launchpad.

  • We're currently working to activate our new West Coast launch site at Vandenberg Air Force Base, about three hours north of us here in our factory.

  • It's a place I know well, having worked at the very same launchpad some 30 years ago as a young captain in the Air Force, we'll show you some of the work going on at the new Vanderburgh launch site.

  • A little bit later in the Webcast for today is I've said before Launch is always the most exciting part of the job for the Space X team and We'll hopefully see the payoff of all our hard work in just a little while, but no guarantees.

  • You're correct, Geico.

  • Everything has to work right.

  • During the just over nine minutes, it'll take Falcon nine to get Dragon into low earth orbit.

  • The entire Space X team has been checking and re checking to make sure that everything is go for launch this morning.

  • Thanks, John.

  • Just a few minutes.

  • We'll have you tell us about the Falcon nine on the launch pad in Florida right now.

  • Just 36 minutes away from launch.

  • So also with us is another veteran Webcast host Jessica Jensen.

  • Hi, Kiko.

  • Everyone, you recently had a change of jobs here at Space six.

  • That's correct.

  • After six years as manager of dynamic Environments, analyzing and testing our vehicles for vibrations, I've joined the mission management team.

  • Now I work with NASA planning all of our future cargo resupply mission.

  • And you've been here since 2006?

  • Yes.

  • I started to music just after the first launch of Falcon one.

  • Back when the company was a lot smaller than it was today.

  • Um, in the past few years, I concentrated on Falcon nine now it's really great to be working with their NASA customer on our space.

  • Six.

  • Dragon Team's preparing for the upcoming missions going to the space station that several coming months and years.

  • Kiko has also been doing some pretty cool dragon stuff.

  • So why don't you tell the viewers about that?

  • Okay.

  • I've been at Space X for almost three years now, and I started by designing and testing the batteries that are flying today on both Falcon nine and Dragon.

  • Recently, I joined the team developing our crew caring version of Dragon.

  • The goal of taking our first space six astronauts to orbit in just a couple of years.

  • Of course, we represent just three of the more than 3000 team members here at Space six.

  • We're working hard to support NASA and are many commercial customers around the world with the ultimate goal of making humans a multi planet species.

  • It's true, Kiko, what do you think about going to Mars?

  • I think I do that visiting large for a couple years sounds like fun, and it could be pretty awesome.

  • All right, well, let's get back down to Earth.

  • So if all goes as planned, today's Webcast is gonna last roughly an hour.

  • First, we'll be checking in on launched at us with John.

  • Then we'll find out what we're carrying to and from the International Space Station.

  • We'll also take a quick look at some of the really exciting activities happening at Space X.

  • Finally, the most exciting part which are all here for today, is we're gonna watch the vehicle cameras live video feed from lift off all the way to orbit.

  • So on that note, John, give us our first launch update.

  • Sure, Jessica, as with previous flights, were watching four major systems involved in this morning's launch.

  • First, we have the Falcon nine launch vehicle, which is ready and waiting on the pad in Florida.

  • The career olfaction nine with dragon out of the hangar almost 24 hours ago.

  • Last night, about 14 hours before launch, we finished loading what we call the late cargo into Dragon.

  • This is NASA's last minute items that may be time sensitive going to the space station.

  • We hook up to the pants systems and raise the vehicle the vertical Last night we cleared the area around the vehicle this morning so that we could begin propellant loading of kerosene and liquid oxygen into the first and second stages of the Falcon nine that started about the three hours ago and finished up about 90 minutes later.

  • The flight safety systems have completed their checks between the Air Force Range Safety folks in the Space six team in the rocket Now, Currently, we're topping off the liquid oxygen.

  • On the first and second stages, you can see a white plume of gaseous oxygen coming off of the rocket.

  • The liquid oxygen continues to boil off slowly and we replenish it during the countdown.

  • Will stop doing that in the last few minutes before lift off when we pressurize the tanks for flight.

  • We're also currently topping off the helium pressurization gas stored in bottles on the vehicle, squeezing the last little bits of helium into the bottle before we're ready for flight.

  • So Space six launch control in Florida reports right now the vehicle is looking good for flight.

  • They're working no major issues.

  • Uh, just under 33 minutes before launch.

  • Second, we have the dragon spacecraft, which is operated from space.

  • Sex is Mission Control Center right here in Hawthorne, California.

  • You can see here on the Webcast, the Space six flight crew team will monitor Dragon 24 hours a day while it is in space.

  • Mission Control Center reports that Dragon is ready and it's waiting for terminal countdown in T minus 10 minutes.

  • They're working no major issues on Dragon.

  • The last major activity that dragon has is going to internal power at about T minus eight minutes.

  • The third factor today is the range.

  • Cape Canaveral Air Force Station supports us with flight safety radar and long range cameras.

  • They currently indicate they're ready to support the launch.

  • What we call fully mission capable.

  • They have the primary and the redundant systems ready to go to track us as we head into orbit and watch over the rocket.

  • We've also done a collision avoidance analysis that shows there are no orbital hazards in the flight path of Falcon nine and Dragon.

  • As we had the orbit, we take a look at the flight path to make sure that there aren't any spacecraft debris in the way and that could normally cause us to have to move the launch time.

  • There's nothing in the rate way today.

  • The runway is clear to space, so we're gonna launch on time just a little bit after 10 minutes after the hour.

  • The range also monitors factor number four, and that's the weather.

  • Now the weather report from the weather folks continues the Showa 20% probability of violation of the launch constraints for weather or being an optimist.

  • I look at that.

  • It's saying that's an 80% probability of good weather this morning.

  • Now take that in the launch business right now, the thing they're most looking at is the possibility of thick clouds over the vehicle, near or at lift off.

  • Also, we're looking at the winds at ground level.

  • It's kind of breezy.

  • It's chilly in Cape today temperatures, not an issue, but the winds were looking at.

  • But currently we are within constraints to be able to release Falcon nine.

  • It's easier on let her fly.

  • We're currently right now also looking at balloon data.

  • The range releases balloons for us.

  • We've been doing that during this morning.

  • We're getting the last balloon data in as we're talking in the Webcast.

  • Currently, the data indicates from a controls and a guidance on loads capability that the winds are benign enough for us to fly.

  • We're not gonna be stressing the launch vehicle, so that's a good thing for us today, showing that the vehicle has got enough margin and ready to fly.

  • So currently, right now we're just over 30 minutes from lift off.

  • And while we get joked about it, uh, it's basics.

  • Here everything is nominal.

  • One of our favorite works words.

  • So the Falcon nine's Good Dragons good.

  • The range is good, and the balloons and the weather data are also good.

  • So with that, we were right where we want it.

  • And with that back to Yukiko.

  • Thanks for the update, John.

  • Today's flight is the second of a minimum of 12 launches we have for NASA's Commercial Resupply Service's or CRS program.

  • Now NASA basically created this program to help develop new commercial space capabilities.

  • Some have compared this to the early days of air travel, where the Postal Service hired private companies begin providing air mail.

  • Eventually, some of these carriers began transporting people, and this basically evolved into the modern commercial aviation system that spans the globe today.

  • Like our previous missions to the space station, we need to launch a specific time today.

  • That time is 10 10 Eastern time, or just about 30 minutes from now.

  • Now, if we missed today's liftoff time due to weather any other reason, we can reset and try again tomorrow, about 20 minutes earlier than today.

  • Once again, we asked you our viewers to send us your questions for Space X.

  • But this time we requested them his videos and wow that we get some fantastic responses.

  • Here is the first of our viewer video question.

  • Hi, Space X.

  • My name is cold.

  • I live in Cumming, Georgia.

  • I am seven years old and the question is, what would I have to do?

  • Thio working Space X for Grandma.

  • I grew up.

  • Thank you.

  • Thanks.

  • Cool.

  • That's a great question.

  • Now, since you're already seven years old, the first thing Just be curious about everything.

  • Find out how stuff is made, how things were even.

  • Get your hands on something that's broken.

  • Take it apart.

  • Try and fix it.

  • Put it back together.

  • Another great thing is to learn about computers.

  • One cool way is there's robot toys where you can actually take them and program to do things.

  • Such a kick a ball.

  • Another good thing is build.

  • Model rockets can build a model rocket launch in your backyard or in a park.

  • That's a really good way to learn about how rockets fly.

  • And then as you get older, obviously good good grades and go to college.

  • We'd recommend you get a degree in engineering.

  • You could pick aerospace, mechanical, computer civil.

  • Any of those were great, but one of the biggest things that Space X looks for his hands on experience.

  • So we'd like to see you get involved with design teams at school, maybe a student, satellite or student race car project.

  • Then, once you're done with all that, give us a call, all right, and another very popular question is, What are we taking to and from the International Space Station?

  • We have a cool video to show you about that.

  • On her latest Brian Resupply mission, October, we carried a variety of equipment, experiments and supplies, including real frozen, the real frozen ice cream for the astronauts, not that freeze dried kind.

  • Then, on return, we brought back a large amount of equipment and medical samples as well.

  • A Space X is first living passenger alive Johnson jumper.

  • Spider, named Never TD, who had spent 100 days living in hopping aboard the station, is part of a student developed experiment.

  • Now today's Dragon mission carries over 670 kilograms, or £1400 of cargo in the pressurized section.

  • One of these pieces of cargo is a robotic micro lab developed by the young women in the San Diego Science Alliance.

  • These are high school students flying their experiments to the international space Station.

  • How cool is that now?

  • This mission is the first time we're using Dragon Spacious trunk section.

  • We've loaded with the 370 kilograms, £800 equipment module but is destined for the exterior of the station a few days after a dragon arrives in first, astronaut Chris Hadfield of Canada and Kevin Ford, Tom Osborne of the USA, will operate the robotic arm to unload the cargo and anchor it to the station's exterior.

  • Or it will be ready for future use.

  • Finally, at the end of the mission about 25 days from now, if all goes as planned, we're gonna be bringing over 1000 kilograms for £2200 of supplies, equipment and medical samples back to Earth.

  • And who knows, Maybe they'll be more astronaut animals coming home with us.

  • Very cool, Jessica.

  • I actually had no idea we were bringing back live passengers on the last mission.

  • Okay, so we have another viewer video question asked about some of our upcoming developments.

  • Hi.

  • I'm an image of Selena.

  • I'm from port in Portugal.

  • Although the dragon uses Falcon nine as a two stage to orbit launcher, did you consider making a single stage door with vehicle?

  • And what are your thoughts on S S t o as a safer means of transport for astronauts.

  • Thank you, John.

  • Selina, for your question, you mentioned safety Space six designs and manufactures our vehicles to provide the most reliable access to space.

  • Our design features show this focus in the Falcon nine.

  • We use a high pressure, new manic stage separation system.

  • Not an explosive, bold, explosive nuts system.

  • Like some other launch vehicles.

  • This allows us to test our systems before we launch them.

  • Unlike explosives, which you don't know if they're going to work until you actually call upon them in flight on the Falcon nine.

  • We also have what we call our whole before release launch system on the pad.

  • When we like the nine Merlin engines on the first stage later this morning, we'll hold down the vehicle, make sure we've got full thrust, all the systems working, and then the launch mount will release the vehicle for flight.

  • I kind of like on an airplane where the pilot runs the throttles up at the end of the runway but keeps the foot on the brake, make sure everything is good, then takes the foot off the brake and you're cleared for launch and sail on down the runway.

  • We also use two stages instead of three stages or four stages.

  • That helps minimize the complexity, improves the reliability and safety of the vehicle.

  • Now is for single stage to orbit or S S t o that capability.

  • Kurt currently continues to exist on Lee in literature or in the movies, but concepts like S S T.

  • O.

  • R.

  • Reflected in our design.

  • For example, most of the weight of the space six launch vehicle is propellant, not the metal or composite structures that results in a very efficient or what we call mass fraction efficiency for the first and second stages of the Falcon nine and Falcon Heavy.

  • Now it's Space six.

  • We're focused on innovations that increase the reliability and frequency of access to space in the factory behind us.

  • We're manufacturing the strong, lightweight carbon composite parts for our Falcon nine vehicles and our new Falcon heavy rocket.

  • We manufacture the engines, the tanks, the composite structures, even the avionics for much of the vehicle.

  • Now the Falcon Heavy, which I mentioned, will provide the world's largest available lift capacity up to 53 metric tons or £117,000 to low Earth orbit and our rocket test site and migrate your Texas.

  • We've been flying our grasshopper vertical takeoff and landing vehicle.

  • This vehicle has a Falcon nine first stage tank, a single Merlin engine and four sturdy landing legs, and it takes off and lands entirely under its own rocket power.

  • This space X funded program is intended to change the way we get into space by helping lead to the creation of a fully reusable launch system.

  • We're conducting a series of test flights of increasing altitude and complexity.

  • Our next grasshopper test is coming up soon.

  • Also in Texas.

  • We've been testing the Super Draco rocket engines.

  • You can see one firing here on the Webcast.

  • These will be essential when we start flying Astronauts on Dragon, the Super Draco's provide a quick getaway in case of a launch vehicle failure.

  • They can also be used for propulsive landing at the end of a successful mission.

  • We designed Dragon from the start to enable the carrying of people.

  • And with the addition of seats, suits and life support, we're on track to fly our first crew of space six astronauts in the year 2015.

  • And finally, we're looking forward to activating our newest long site at Vandenberg Air Force Base, about three hours north of Los Angeles.

  • Like our Florida launch site for today's mission, the new site is also a former Titan floor launchpad, but we've operated it into a state of the art site.

  • It will be capable of launching both the Falcon nine and the Falcon heavy vehicles, and please note for folks, even including Cole, we are hiring talent and motivated people with a passion for space.

  • So check out our careers button on our website.

  • Thanks a lot of exciting activity going on here all right.

  • Our next video of your question relates to mission timing.

  • Let's tickle.

  • Hi, I'm Mike, hailing from Ann