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  • three.

  • It's june 15th 2016 about to 12.

  • Universal Coordinated time or 10 12 Eastern.

  • Sent on your screen is a live view of the Falcon nine launch vehicle beneath a sparkling sapphire sky at Space Launch Complex 40 and Cape Canaveral, Florida.

  • Welcome to the live Space six Webcast.

  • I'm Michel Hamersley, materials engineer for our avionics department.

  • I'm standing outside of Mission Control at our headquarters in Hawthorne, California, and launches about 15 minutes from now to 29 Universal coordinated time or 10 29 Eastern time.

  • We're launching two satellites today.

  • These are the all electric you tell Sat 1 17 west B and the A B s to a satellite.

  • We're taking them on a geo stationary transfer orbit and they're going to move themselves a little bit higher altitude to a geo stationary orbit.

  • You tell sat 1 17 West B will be near South America and a B s to a will be near South Asia were also hoping to recover the first stage again on this mission.

  • Lansing and landing it on a drone ship on and we're excited.

  • Let's get started.

  • Good morning from Los Angeles on Kate.

  • Thais process improvement engineering here in space sex.

  • And, like Michael said today, we are launching for you tell sat and a B s.

  • So we're gonna be talking a lot of detail about what those payloads are.

  • So I'm gonna be filling you in a little bit about what's going on at our launch site.

  • So this is Space Launch Complex 40 and Cape Canaveral, Florida He may hear us refer to it as SLC or slick 40 during our Webcast.

  • There's a lot that goes on here that you can't really see one of them being the hold down clamps here at the bottom of the rocket.

  • This is also where the nine Merlin engines are located.

  • For those of you that may be tuning in for the first time for a Webcast, that's where the fire comes.

  • Out here we have the first stage as well as the interstate's.

  • The first stage is what holds our propellants, so we used liquid oxygen, which we may refer to as walks as well as liquid kerosene.

  • Also known as R P.

  • One.

  • Those tanks are here in the first stage.

  • The interstate is what protects the nozzle of the second stage engine, which is right up here during stage separation.

  • The interstate and the first stage will come back and hopefully lands on our drone ship, which is currently laid located a couple 100 miles off the coast of Florida.

  • And that is, of course, I still love you.

  • So those will be coming back, back down with more information on that leader.

  • Well, second stage engine and the second stage will be taking the two satellites out, too.

  • Geo stationary transfer orbits.

  • And we do that again later on in Webcasting, giving you more tea details about that now, some of the other things that we often get asked about thes tolerance years.

  • Those air Lightning powers countered with me.

  • Orlando Cape Canaveral is the lightning capital of the United States, and so we want to make sure that our vehicle is protected from that high amount of energy that may come down.

  • So what is very difficult to see if we've got some wires here connecting those towers as well, and they kind of encapsulate a little bit around the top.

  • It's just to protect that vehicle from all sides, so that's a little bit about what goes on at Cape Canaveral.

  • Good morning.

  • Thank you.

  • To those who have got up early on the specific coast to watch the lovely launch of you tell Set and A B s to geo stationary transfer orbit.

  • My name is Brian, and I'm one of the automation software engineers here in Hawthorne, California.

  • And today I want to provide you an overview with two aspects number one, the general phasing that most space X launches go through and the number to the specific mission for today.

  • So in terms of the general things that we do on launch Day, as you just saw on the pad and as Kate just describes vulcanized essentially two rockets stacked on top of each other, both of those first lift off from the ground from the propulsion from first stage at a certain altitude, they separate first stage, then goes back to land.

  • I get the drone ship today, or the landing zone and other missions, and then Second states continues on to deliver the payload to its desired orbit.

  • That is the primary mission.

  • For every single time you see one of these Webcast, it's to get the payload that is sitting within the faring at the tip of second stage to its intended orbit.

  • Now what is that specific mission for today?

  • It's to launch a satellite from you Tell SAT and A B s, as my co hosts have mentioned, Utah SATs model is 1 17 w.

  • B.

  • Now that really stands for the longitude that it's going to 117 degrees west longitude.

  • This is to provide coverage to the Latin America's Remember Geo.

  • Stationary satellites stay above the same regions as earth rotates.

  • This is you'll see that what you tell sat 1 17 W b because we launch you tell sat 1 17 a just 15 months ago.

  • A B s is the other satellite within the fairing.

  • This is to a and it will be going to 76 degrees east to provide coverage to portions of Asia and Africa.

  • It's called a because launched A B s to 15 months ago on the same flight as with all programs will bring you live footage of lift off as well as another attempted landing of the first state so that we can get that reuse mailed down.

  • Hello, I'm John Inspector Falcon nine, principal integration engineer.

  • is I've done in the past.

  • I'll be bringing you status updates and Webcast commentary throughout the flight from our launch desk here in Space six headquarters in Hawthorne, California Now, as you hurt, it's early morning here in Hawthorne.

  • But as you also saw the start of the Webcast, the day shift employees they're gathering for the Falcon nine launch.

  • You're standing in front of our Mission Control center.

  • We'll be watching the flight along with all of us here on the Webcast.

  • Now.

  • Currently, we're deep into the launch, out of sequence at T minus and 11.5 minutes before launch.

  • This is where the ground computers assisted with the Falcon nine flight computers are doing the final checks of the vehicle and loading propellants.

  • So let's take a look where we are right now.

  • In the countdown.

  • Now the Falcon nine rolled out to the launch pad about T minus 17 hours yesterday.

  • Way got out to the pad and plenty of time to allow the spacecraft team to do spacecraft checkouts.

  • Way went vertical went through testing early this morning, and we're currently now loading propellant onto the 1st 2nd stage now currently feel is already loaded on to the second stage.

  • That is the RP one kerosene feel, and we have just ended loading feel onto the Falcon nine first stage.

  • So now we're just down the loading, the liquid oxygen on the boat, the first in the second stage.

  • It's that's going to continue up until just about the T minus two minutes.

  • Martin.

  • Now, on the spacecraft side, you tell Santa in the A B s teams, unless we got vertical on the pad, they did their checkouts.

  • They've gone from external power to internal power and just verified that they're on internal.

  • All their systems are looking good.

  • Range is ready to support with the tracking and flight safety systems that we need to fly into space today.

  • And the weather's looking good.

  • You can see the blue skies with just some puffy clouds in the background, the upper altitude winds.

  • They're still looking good, so everything is cooperating right now for a launch.

  • In just over 10 minutes, you tell Scent is one of the world's leading satellite operators.

  • They currently have 40 geo stationary satellites in their fleet, and you tell sat 1 17 west beat will be the second next generation satellite.

  • In there, you tell set America's fleet.

  • It'll be co located with 1 17 west, you tell sat 1 17 west a off the west coast of South America, and this new multi satellite neighborhood will strengthen the video capacities.

  • At that longitude, I will be offering key service's toe, Latin American clients and telecommunications and government service is, and it's expected to enter commercial service in the first quarter of 2017.

  • Now these videos service's air going to include direct HomeServices as well as support for digital terrestrial television networks.

  • The satellite has 48 transponders with four regional beams covering Mexico, the Caribbean, most of Latin American.

  • Even the tip of Antarctica is operating in the K U band, which is reserved exclusively for satellites.

  • Satellites, if you will recall, communicate with electromagnetic electromagnetic waves, which includes light and radio waves.

  • The K U band is a portion of that spectrum 12 to 18 gigahertz, part of the microwave spectrum on I know you're wondering.

  • Your home microwave oven operates at 2.45 gigahertz.

  • Another cool fact is that the hosted payload from raping on it will be hosting a payload from Raytheon that the federal Federal Aviation Administration excuse me, we'll be using for aviation safety.

  • A B s is one of the world's fastest growing global satellite operators.

  • They have six satellites serving 80% of the world's population.

  • A B s to a will be co located with A B S to 75 degrees East Indian Pakistan serving Africa in the Middle East, Russia, South Asia and South East Asian.

  • It's also equipped with high performance You banned beans.

  • It's part of the same spectrum is the hotel San satellite, and this satellite will be offering a B s customers expansion capacity as well as in orbit.

  • Redundancy for growing directive home business.

  • Both satellites are designed for director HomeServices the map that you see the moment eyes not the satellite's coverage as much as 80 s world coverage, and they're going to be designed for other V SAT operators.

  • These hot stands for very small aperture terminal.

  • That means you can point a small satellite dish about the size of a pizza box at the satellite and gain access to the communications network satellite operator provides.

  • And this footage that you're seeing on the screen at the moment is of the two satellites undergoing final preparations for launch.

  • After this step, they get integrated into the fairing on.

  • They are currently standing upright at the launch complex.

  • Then those solar panels are enormous.

  • Up next, we've got some cool footage of our Texas site where the Rocket undergoes its own preparations.

  • Hello, my name's David.

  • Helpfully, I'm the site director for the space sex Texas Rocket developed a test facility here in Texas.

  • What makes McGregor unique is this is generally where the fun happens, in my opinion, So we get to see some really cool stuff in McGregor, Texas.

  • We get to make the smoke and fire.

  • So last year we averaged about 400 Merlin tests.

  • That's more than one every counter day for just a moment.

  • If you throw, the stage is into the mix and everything else we do.

  • We could.

  • On any given day, we could be running somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 to 50 tests Space six Texas is about 4200 acres total.

  • I guess an interesting note on that is about half of it is cultivated that we inherited as we leased the land so we actually have corn, wheat and just hey in production on the side as well.

  • We have about 15 test areas, so we're standing in the central hangar, which is where we do the 1st 2nd stage integration work.

  • So after we test the stages, we put them in the hangar.

  • We do post test check outs before we send them to watch site.

  • Small site is where a lot of the smoking fire happens.

  • That's where the engines are tested in our own engines and second stages tested over there.

  • Well, we also have the components stand over there.

  • There's a lot of talk, a nine component tests.

  • If you go up to the north side of sight, that's where large site is.

  • That's where booster stand is.

  • That's where test for stage way have dragon sights.

  • That's where we test Drake.

  • Oh, that's such a process.

  • Dragon.

  • Do all the dragon cargo offload in Texas?

  • What's also great about Texas and particulars.

  • There's there's always something exciting happening at some particular test, and there's new boundaries.

  • Were pushing this new hardware here seemed to always be a new ground, which definitely means it's never boring around here.

  • There's always something exciting going on.

  • We're t minus five minutes 22 seconds and counting things they're looking go for an on time launch.

  • We're continuing to quickly step through.

  • The automated sequence that I talked about were bleeding in chilling the Merlin engines Right now.

  • Ground systems air continuing the load.

  • Liquid oxygen on the boat.

  • The first and second stages.

  • We pulled the team a T minus 38 minutes for readiness to enter launch.

  • Auto sequence is it's called.

  • That's the scripted sequence where the ground in the flight computers prepare the Falcon nine for flight.

  • There's minimal involvement by the launch team.

  • That's why you don't hear a whole lot on the countdown naps during the Webcast.

  • Now, currently, and propellant load, we're still putting liquid oxygen on the boat.

  • The first stage and the second stage is, I said before that will wrap up T minus two minutes.

  • Wait a cz long as we can to keep liquid oxygen as cold as possible.

  • Nick is this maximum performance for the Falcon nine to carry our customers into space.

  • Some of the event you're going to see coming up very shortly.

  • We're pressurizing the first and second stages that will open up the clamp arms and we'll begin retracting the strong back.

  • What about 3.5 minutes?

  • You'll see a strong backer, Klein, that move to the 77 degree position.

  • That's our launch position.

  • Proper little finish T minus two minutes.

  • Over £1.1 million.

  • Propelling will be on board the rocket.

  • Currently, you tell Sam a navy s team's already range is ready to support Weather conditions look good.

  • So a T minus three minutes and 50 seconds and counting always go rapid reusability.

  • You've heard this buzzword be used multiple times as a prerequisite for the quest to make humanity multi planetary.

  • What exactly is reusability?

  • Look is comprised of two main pieces recovery and then re flight.

  • Now, recovery is something that you've seen our previous Webcast.

  • We've had some success with, states goes to orbit and it comes back in.

  • It lands in a safe manner that we can recover.

  • Its second half of that puzzle is re flight.

  • It's making sure that you are ready to fly that same recovered vehicle again and so you can re fly it.

  • It's not technically reusable.

  • Then we're adding maturity to that research for vacation program as we speak.

  • But the ultimate finish line for all these rockets is to land.

  • If it lands on the drone ship, it gets taken on the service of the drone ship awaits support.

  • That's what you see on your screen now in the vertical position.

  • It then gets loaded horizontally onto a truck and taken back to the launch site to be re flown.

  • The exact same thing happens if it lands in a landing zone.

  • It gets put on a truck as you see and gets taken to the launch site again.

  • The goal is to return to the launch site, get refuels, retested and then go back up to space.

  • Now the refueling is a pretty easy part of the retesting.

  • It's hard.

  • We want to make sure that the engine that you remember seeing behind me they weren't jostled and flight.

  • Nothing was subjected to extreme heat conditions that would cause it to the form in a certain way.

  • That's where automation is keep.

  • We need to be able to ensure that the vehicle flies the second time justice safely, Justus nominally as the first time now, remember that is a secondary mission.

  • So as we turn our sights back over to the primary mission before we re fly way must land.

  • And before we land, we must launch.

  • So let's listen into terminal countdown now.

  • D minus two minutes.

  • Stage two lakhs secured for flight.

  • Initializing blocks grand close up Vehicles and self line.

  • Stage one.

  • Stage two.

  • You crow.

  • Helium scared flight VC.

  • Verify Falcon nine isn't startup.

  • Falcon nine's and start up.

  • Flight suffers.

  • Control the vehicle.

  • Stage one.

  • Stage two.

  • You're pressing for flight T minus 30 seconds.

  • T minus 20.

  • Falcon nine's security flight pressures.

  • T minus 10 nine eight seven 65 four three two one zero.

  • Lift off of the Falcon nine nine Towers dissection.

  • One minute in the flight.

  • Falcon nine is heading down range after lifting off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral.

  • Apparently the Merlin one be engines are operating at full power.

  • We're watching the launch from the space six cameras on the ground at Cape Canaveral.

  • Right now, the Falcon nine is heading through the supersonic phase.

  • It's a little hazy to see on the Webcast as we head out into space.

  • We've gone supersonic you've also heard the call out and that chill has begun, just like we do with the first stage.

  • Engines were now chilling in the turbo pump on the upper stage engine to get get it ready for ignition.

  • Coming up.

  • Guess before t plus three minutes.

  • Currently, the team is reporting Falcon nine is operating nominally major event.

  • Coming up in about 30 seconds is shutdown of the nine Merlin engines.

  • Let's listen in for the call out of main engine cut off, successful states raising and the view From the first days looking at the second stage engine has ignited.

  • We're on our way into the parking lot of it.

  • Let's go down to the floor and talk with the team.

  • With successful separation of the first and second stage, we now continue one.

  • As the two separate stages perform their separate responsibilities, you were just looking at a view of first stage.

  • Put it back down towards the earth.

  • Second, say just continuing on.