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  • Hello, everyone.

  • My name is Seema, and I'm here to teach you a lesson on since part expressions with the word make.

  • Now I own.

  • This is a very common work, right?

  • So how many?

  • If you can tell me what is the meaning?

  • Off make.

  • Well, I'm sure.

  • You know, make generally is used to explain the word create.

  • You make something, you make a cake, right, or you produce something.

  • But the great thing about English is that you don't need to know really big words to speak good English.

  • Even if you know this word, you can speak a lot off English and speak really well.

  • You know how you simply have to pare this word with a proposition or an adverb, and you will come out with some really smart expressions by using this simple word.

  • Now, in grammar, these smart expressions are also called as phrase a war bs.

  • And believe me, when you use phrase of orbs, you are going to sound like a really fluent speaker.

  • In fact, a lot of native speakers frequently use phrases of orbs or small expressions with many of orbs.

  • But today I will take you through the expressions with the orb make.

  • The first expression is make up.

  • Now we have paired this word make with the proposition up.

  • Okay, But now make will no longer mean create.

  • Because now that we've paired these two words together, they come together to mean something totally different.

  • They mean to forgive each other.

  • So when I say to make up, it simply means to forgive each other.

  • So how do we use that in a sentence?

  • The couple decided to make up after last night's fight.

  • So, uh, as you can see there not looking very happy, you're quite angry at each other.

  • I'm guessing the guy probably burned dinner last night and they had a big fight.

  • So it's fine now because they have decided to make up or they've decided to forgive each other.

  • We can use it in another sentence by saying, Why don't we just make up and forget everything that happened?

  • Okay, so another couple or maybe just friends, they're obviously going through a disagreement of some sort, but they want to just make up.

  • They wanna for give each other on, forget everything that happened.

  • They want to make it right, right?

  • So that is make up for you.

  • Okay, We have another expression which is make up for now.

  • Please note that we have make up, but we also have another proposition.

  • So we've got two propositions on the expression is make up for it.

  • It means to compensate, or it means to repay, or it means to reimburse.

  • What do you mean by these words?

  • They all mean the same thing, right?

  • I mean, each of these words, they mean the exact same thing.

  • But what does it mean to compensate or repay or remembers?

  • So compensate means to make sure that a loss is kind off.

  • Not gonna affect you so much.

  • So let's say, for example, you are in the business and the business is not doing too well.

  • But you want to compensate by kind of working extra or maybe making better investments.

  • So you are gonna make sure that you repay or you compensate by reducing the loss.

  • Okay, let's look at it in a sentence.

  • So you say I didn't exercise last week, but this week I'm made up for it.

  • So what happened here last week?

  • You didn't exercise, so there was some loss.

  • What was the loss.

  • The loss was that your diet plan did not really go in the direction that you wanted it to do.

  • I thought you made up for it.

  • I have mentioned the word made up because it happens to be the past tens off the word make.

  • OK, so you've got to also pay attention to the tents.

  • If you are saying a sentence in the past tense or referring to something in the past like last week, then you will use made up.

  • You will change the form, but the expression essentially stays the same.

  • Okay, then we have another sentence to help you on this time.

  • It's a little better.

  • You could say we need to make up for the loss due to negligence.

  • So over here we've got some gentlemen sitting in an office in a board meeting discussing their work, and I'm assuming that they're probably going through a certain financial loss in their company.

  • But they wanna make up for the loss due to their negligence.

  • They want to compensate.

  • They want to repay they wantto remorse and see how they can make it right.

  • Okay, I would.

  • Next expression is make off another proposition used with the word make to give you another smart expression.

  • So what does that mean?

  • It means to understand or to make sense off something.

  • Both of these expressions mean the same thing.

  • When you understand something, you kind of see things more clearly when you can make sense of something.

  • You kind of see things more clearly and how to use that in the sentence.

  • You could say I don't know what to make off his behavior.

  • So this guy out here is quite strange.

  • He's quite erratic, and he's probably not behaving like he usually does.

  • So you're simply saying I don't know what to make off his behavior.

  • I don't understand his behavior.

  • It just means that you're not able to make sense of his behavior.

  • Okay, so you must use the sevens very often on this expression.

  • You could also say Ms Ria is quite strange.

  • What do you make of her?

  • So we've got this lady here and she's obviously very different.

  • She's very unconventional on dhe.

  • You don't understand her personality.

  • And when that happens, you can always say, Oh, did you see that girl?

  • She's a little different.

  • What do you make off her.

  • That's one way of expressing that.

  • You don't understand something.

  • So make off is basically used to say that you understand, or you can make sense of something.

  • And that's how you use it in a sentence.

  • We have another expression which is make out.

  • Okay.

  • What does that mean?

  • It means to see things.

  • Clearly.

  • It means to see things for what they really are.

  • Now I want to ask you a question.

  • Can you see that gentleman over there?

  • I can't.

  • I mean, he could be anybody.

  • He could be, Ah, friend.

  • He could be, you know, a movie star.

  • He could be anybody while.

  • Why can I not see him?

  • Because he's standing out there in the dark.

  • I would say it's hard to make out who's standing in the shadows.

  • So when you cannot see things clearly, it means that you cannot make out things very well or if your handwriting is like mine.

  • This is actually very close to the way I write, which is why we've now used the digital screen.

  • As you can see, you can say something like no one can make out, which means no one can clearly see or figure out my handwriting.

  • In fact, the other phrase a word for this would also be figure out.

  • So you have another one for you as well.

  • Okay.

  • All right, then let's move on to the next one, which is make up things.

  • Now, here we've used make with the proposition.

  • But the word things happens to be announced.

  • Now, why have we use this?

  • Because we're making up what?

  • We're making up things.

  • And what does that really mean?

  • It means to tell lies.

  • It means to cook up stories.

  • You know, we cook food, but there are some people, in fact, a lot of people who love to cook up stories.

  • In fact, cook up is also an expression to say that you're just making up things.

  • You're just telling lies.

  • You're not telling the truth.

  • So let's see how we can use that in a sentence.

  • A cave.

  • So he made up things when he was questioned for being late.

  • Okay, so as you can see, here is the boss and years wth e employee on this employee seems to have a problem with coming on time to work on.

  • I'm assuming that this is not the first time he was questioned.

  • Right?

  • So what does he do?

  • He makes up things.

  • He cooks up stories.

  • One day he might tell the boss that he had to run an errand the other day.

  • He might just tell his boss that, you know, he met with an accident.

  • But in reality, I'm pretty sure he just woke up late.

  • He's making up things.

  • He's making up stories.

  • Okay.

  • And we have another sentence.

  • Your Which says, Stop making up things.

  • I know it was you.

  • Now, when you want to, you know, call out people for something that they're doing.

  • Especially when they're telling lies.

  • You can straight off, tell them that.

  • Stop lying.

  • Stop making up things.

  • I know it was you.

  • As you can see, that the mother over your is reprimanding her child because she obviously believes that the child was telling lies about something.

  • We now have another expression which is make off.

  • What does that mean?

  • It means to hurry up or to escape with something.

  • Obviously, when you're escaping or Harding off, it means that you are running away from something right on.

  • That is pretty much what the expression make off means.

  • So we have a sentence.

  • Your which says the pick pocket made off with the wallet.

  • There's no way we can find him now, which is true if you are honest, you know, on the street late at night, Possibly You shouldn't really go alone because this is something that could happen to you.

  • A pickpocket will take your wallet on it.

  • People make off, which means he will just run away.

  • Or just hurry off with your wallet and you will never, ever find him or her.

  • Right?

  • So that's the meaning off make off and then you have another sentence which says, Let's make off before anyone finds out.

  • So I love this picture because there are.

  • These are two siblings, I guess.

  • And they're kind of doing something very naughty year there, possibly pranking someone, but they want to make sure no one finds out.

  • So they wanna make off.