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  • Hi, everyone.

  • Welcome back to my channel.

  • This is an episode of Life of Nuba Live show.

  • And today my guest is a loose Sita who is now a full time writer and used to be a senior software engineer at work previously on Facebook.

  • And she's gonna tell us in this video about perjury an inch attack into becoming a software engineer at use.

  • Awesome.

  • Cos don't forget to subscribe to this channel and stay tuned.

  • Great, eh?

  • How are you doing today?

  • I'm great.

  • I'm so excited to be here.

  • Thank you for having Yeah, I'm super excited to have you.

  • How's your How's your Rico world?

  • It's been great.

  • Way just got back from Japan about go.

  • And so we are.

  • So I've been doing basically my first week as a full time writer.

  • Well, has been great, but also kind of weird because I just came from vacation and my husband is still on vacation because he doesn't go back to work until tomorrow.

  • Oh, so it's like my vacation and my working What's my life now?

  • Except how do you feel about beautiful time, writer?

  • That you?

  • I mean, you have to don't have to go to work in.

  • Yeah, I like it.

  • I do feel like I'm gonna need structure.

  • And so, like, one of my chores for the week.

  • I'm not sure, but like tasks is to start researching Coworking faces.

  • And I have a couple that I thinking about.

  • I'm going to figure that out, but it's like I'm a creature of habit, like structure.

  • And so I'm like, if I if I'm just, like in my pajamas every day, I think I'm gonna go crazy.

  • Yeah, that makes sense.

  • Great.

  • So tell me a little more about how you got into tech.

  • So I've been doing tech seriously for about 10 years.

  • I started when I was in high school.

  • I took an AP computer science class.

  • I have done some coating before in middle school, but it was like baby coding where, you know, it was only hope runtime revolution.

  • We were dealing with cards and, like, buttons, and they had actions, and it was fun.

  • And it kind of is what got me excited.

  • But it wasn't until I school when I started taking mule coding classes.

  • Yeah, and I and I likes it right away, but I kind of didn't think it was.

  • I think I was good at it.

  • And then it took another year or two before I sort of feel like, OK, this actually what I think I want to do.

  • And so in college, I started taking classes more seriously.

  • And the rest is history.

  • Yeah, awesome.

  • So you've got you got into college studying computer science, but I wasn't sure if I was going to do it for sure.

  • I took it.

  • And I took an injury class my first semester, but I didn't necessarily think I wanted to major in it.

  • I did end up majoring in it, but I also majored in literary art.

  • So ended up doing both things.

  • So Wow.

  • So you didn't literally arts while you were doing computer science at school?

  • Yes, exactly.

  • Because I went to Brown.

  • We don't we didn't have.

  • There's no court requirement.

  • Yeah, and so you have more spaces in your schedule to take more classes.

  • And so basically everything I took in my entire time around either went towards my computer science degree or my literary arts degree and the literary are sturdy.

  • Ended up kind of being an accident because I was taking all these classes anyway.

  • But after a year or two, I was like, I basically had this degree without even trying.

  • I might as well Yeah, go for it.

  • So basically, when you were doomed both of those degrees at the same time, it wasn't because you were still thinking whether you wanted to computer science, full time or literature.

  • It was just because you had a lot of time.

  • Yeah, it was.

  • So I mean, with computer science, After about a year, I kind of thought I wanted t do it full time.

  • I really loved that.

  • Created.

  • After two years, I had my first internship, and I pretty she was pretty sure I wanted to do it.

  • Yeah, for like, my job.

  • Literally.

  • Eric was just like I had.

  • I had all these other spaces in my course load.

  • Might as well take some writing class.

  • And I always loved writing.

  • Yeah, And after two years, I was like, I might as well I might as well just go whole hog and get the degree.

  • So the way you got into silicon valets again with was it'll started with internships, right?

  • Yeah.

  • So I entered with Google and 2011.

  • And that I am with Facebook in 2012.

  • Ended up working at Facebook after graduation because I had ended up with return off.

  • Yeah, and so I did Facebook for two years.

  • After that, I decided I wanted something a little smaller.

  • When do you know where I was that uber for 3.5 years.

  • And then I decided I needed to do something totally different and crazy and crazy.

  • And now, the whole time, Children's book writer.

  • So lot, lots of wind a little.

  • You You did an internship with Google first, and then you did an entrance about Facebook.

  • And I know that you, prior to being a full time writer, were a senior android.

  • Generic uber.

  • Yes.

  • So how did you get into entering development to begin with?

  • So when I was at Facebook, the team that I was on that I was assigned to got disbanded, actually, data joined.

  • Somebody does the same thing.

  • It actually happened at Google And just, you know, tech is fast and things that exist one day don't exist next day.

  • Yeah, and the team that I ended up that they ended up meeting people on was an android team, and I have only done Android.

  • I did it.

  • I took the class in it.

  • It was like it was like a game.

  • Devon Andrey course had seen it before.

  • They were like, That's good enough for us.

  • We need an android person that's more experience than a lot of our engineers have a congratulations you're in.

  • And that was what year was 2012.

  • So face it was pretty face.

  • But no, I p o.

  • I think I can't.

  • My gut tells me we're just like you.

  • I don't remember for sure.

  • Hey, eso and you sent that Facebook was, like, still kind of, you know, figuring things out.

  • Yeah, and I think this is I don't say.

  • I think it's still the case were like, You know, you'll think you'll think you're on track to do a product.

  • And then and then things changed.

  • Just because because priorities change or, you know, the environment changes or you spend six months doing something because you think it'll work.

  • Then you realize it won't work for some fundamental reason.

  • Yeah, um, and things just things change, Mason.

  • So?

  • So when they told you okay.

  • Like you're good enough.

  • Let's just go.

  • Go.

  • John Drake.

  • Did they give you any kind of training or was it kind of like figuring out what kind of bigger things out?

  • I done job for years.

  • So what's the job of?

  • This?

  • Was very second nature for me.

  • Oh, Thean tree frameworks.

  • They were like their tutorials online.

  • There are like, it was very much like, bigger every year.

  • Like break things.

  • Right?

  • Awesome.

  • So and then you just, like, started as an intern.

  • Yes, yes.

  • And so I spent the three months we were working on a photos being on Facebook photo sharing.

  • And so we did that.

  • We had a block from the product, like my last day.

  • It was really exciting because it was like Like I would walk around, you know, my my university campus a couple weeks later and like, see people using my feature.

  • Yeah, it was like huge impact.

  • As soon as you work on something that's exactly launch.

  • Exactly.

  • I don't know if you remember, but back in 2012 R before this summer, you could only share one photo at a time on Facebook.

  • And so this photo because you can do it instead of an album.

  • I think also.

  • That's huge people.

  • I guess so.

  • Maybe use some legacy code.

  • Probably just embarrassing, because it was like it was an intern.

  • Code happens.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • So you basically did this huge change of Facebook from, like, one photo upload to mull.

  • Tell me, and a team of people that Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • Oh, that's amazing.

  • And you mentioned that you want your Facebook full time after doing that internship.

  • So I'm curious.

  • Why did you decide to go to Facebook?

  • Full time versus Google?

  • Because I know you've been turned out.

  • Google.

  • So my internship in Facebook waas pretty great.

  • I really, really love my time.

  • There you go.

  • I don't know if I just like Otto.

  • It just didn't feel like a good fit for me.

  • Like it was just like there were some days where my my my manager was really, like, over waiting on something.

  • When you go play pool today like great.

  • Like, that's fine.

  • Yeah, but I like the fast paced environment of Facebook, and, like, I really think it was a very specific, you know, experience had a google, but, uh, would you say that Google was more like fury I could damage.

  • No, I really think it was just like like the team I was on the time that I was at, that I was on that team just had a little bit less to dio it was just kind of bad