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  • please go to the line the computer guy dot com in order to view schematics, code and Maur for the projects that you are learning about.

  • Welcome back.

  • So today's video I'm going to give you a brief overview of virtual box in order to be able to do clinics.

  • Labs in a virtual environment.

  • The nice thing about virtual boxes This is a piece of a virtualization software that allows you to install a full operating system into an instance on your desktop or laptop computer.

  • So you have your desktop or laptop computer and has Windows or Mac or limits or whatever else you install Virtual box on onto that, as you're saying, normal piece of software and then within that you can create instances of other operating systems.

  • So these air full fledged installations of these operating systems, and you were able to interact with them as if they are normal computers so you can change network configurations.

  • You can change configuration files.

  • If you're dealing with Windows Server something like that, you've been set up full active directory infrastructure.

  • Basically these air, full fledged servers or computers.

  • They're simply a virtual instances sitting within a virtual box.

  • Now the reason that we're going to be using virtual boxes because it is open source and free for everything again, Whenever we talk about open source, when the big important things is, make sure you know what the hell you're talking about.

  • So the nice part with virtual box eyes, it is open source, and it is free for enterprise use education to use any kind of use out there.

  • The other thing that I like about it is that it runs basically all the operating systems that you folks will be using.

  • So it runs on Windows.

  • It runs on Mac is which was, But I'll be using it on it runs on Lennox.

  • And if anybody out there still using it and even runs on Solaris.

  • So, yeah, you couple of people out there that feel left out because you're running Solaris machines.

  • Hey, you can run or virtual box, too, so that's a nice part about it.

  • Anybody can go out there and use it.

  • You just download it in stolen and where you can go again, even in the enterprise environment.

  • So if you set something up and you really like it and you don't have to go over to a different product you could just continue to use for a jewel box.

  • So those were some of the things I don't like.

  • One of things that you have to be thinking about if you're going to be using virtual box is make sure you have a machine with decent resource.

  • Is so decent hardware, I would argue at least eight gigs of RAM out argue.

  • A solid state drive, I would argue relatively fast process or the reason being is, Remember, right, we're going to have operating systems on an operating system.

  • So now what's going to happen because you're gonna have your host operates is the Windows Lennox Mac.

  • Whatever else it's we're coming to require RAM, it's going to require hard drive.

  • It's gonna require CPU cycles.

  • Then we're going to spin up.

  • Basically, we're going to turn on instances of operating systems, and now those instances of operating systems will require RAM will require hard drive will require CPO, so just kind of keep this in mind again.

  • I would say you know that that eight gigs of RAM, a solid state drive that's a that's a good minimum.

  • Theoretically, you could do less.

  • I don't know.

  • Maybe you could do six gigs of Ram and 5400 rpm drive.

  • If you really wanted.

  • Just realize your performance.

  • Your performance is definitely going.

  • Be lacking the worst of the worst hardware you have.

  • So just kind of keep this in mind if you're going to be dealing with workable box or really any kind of virtualization software, remember, the hardware still matters.

  • And so if you do virtualization on crappy hardware, you're gonna get crappy kind of flaky results.

  • So anyways, let's go over the computer.

  • I'll show you where you can download of our toolbox from.

  • Then I'll take you through and show you some of their configuration panels and all that to give you an idea of how virtual box works and how you will be setting up a virtual bounce for your Lennox labs.

  • So here we are at virtual box dot or we're gonna go to virtual box dot or and if we want to be able to download and install a virtual box, we simply click on this big green button from there.

  • If they've been come here, we look for the platform packages and we can download for Windows hosts we can download for OS X host we can do for Lennox distributions.

  • And of course, we could do for Solaris if we're using Solaris for whatever reason.

  • Now again, I'm using a Mac book pro in order to do these demonstrations.

  • But more or less everything should be to say I really don't think there will be any differences once you've downloaded this you didn't install Virtual box is a very simple installation procedure.

  • I don't see any reason for me to show you how to do it.

  • So you then install it once it's installed.

  • Then you can open it up when you open up virtual box.

  • Basically, this is what you'll be looking at on Lee for you.

  • You won't initially see this u boat to service.

  • I've created a virtual machine for a bunch of server over here will be completely blank.

  • Now, when you first open up a virtual box for the first time, it may ask you to create a virtual machine s so we can just go through the creating a virtual machine process right now what you do, if you're going to create a virtual machine.

  • So if you're going to create a new bunch of server, whatever else you go over here to this weird blue starry type button, we click on that for a new, and we can start creating a virtual machine.

  • So test for class.

  • So basically the first thing you do is you name your virtual machine, whatever the hell your name or virtual machine.

  • This is basically for you to be clear, This is not the host name of the virtual machine.

  • This is what's gonna show up over here in the left hand side so you can name it whatever weird ass, name one.

  • Don't worry.

  • You're not gonna have to plug that into, uh, into, you know, Network may mean or anything like that past that.

  • We're gonna go down here to the machine folder.

  • So where is the virtual machine?

  • Basically, the virtual hard drive going be stored.

  • All of this is going to be stored in a single file.

  • Eso Where's that file going to be stored?

  • And so it gives a default location.

  • The next thing is, then what kind of operating system do we have?

  • So the type of operating system is it Windows, Lennox, Solaris, BSD.

  • Whatever else we, of course, are using Lennox.

  • And then what kind of Lennox you have all these different.

  • Lennox is here, and so for us we will go down to about 2 64 now, Theoretically, you don't have to be specific on this, I suppose acquitted on Windows and then install Lennox.

  • But it's like all things, the more specific you could be, probably the better on.

  • Then, from there, all we're going to do is click on the continue.

  • The next thing that we're gonna be looking at is the memory.

  • This is the ram size.

  • You have to think about how much Ram your host computer has.

  • So my host has 16 gigs of Ram.

  • And then you have think about how much Ram you want to give to the virtual machine that you're gonna be creating now.

  • One of the funny things when the funny things in life is back when this virtual box is being created.

  • 1024.

  • So one gig of Ram, That's what that's 1024 minutes is a gig.

  • One gig around was a hell of a lot of ran back in the day back 10 years ago, a gig of Ram was like, what?

  • How big around?

  • Um, here's here's one of the times, though.

  • You don't want to leave it a default like seriously, don't leave.

  • It is evil.

  • So if you're doing move on to server, if you're doing a Lennox distribution with no desktop environment so bummed to server, you know what, something like that sent OS, then 1000 24 might be okay for you.

  • But realize realize if you're using something with a modern desktop environment, 1024 is not gonna work literally.

  • Your virtual machine is gonna crash.

  • Uh oh.

  • Bun to requires at least two gigs of RAM with the with the desktop environment.

  • So this is one of those times doing that.

  • Leave the default.

  • If you leave the default and you're installing a Lennox distribution with a desktop environment, you will run into problems.

  • So minimum is two gigs you can do to gigs.

  • I would say, if you if you have the extra, I would go up to three gigs that just gives you a little bit of what your wiggle will room do realize you can change this in the future.

  • So most these configurations that we're setting you can canvass in the future so you can start at three gigs.

  • If three gigs ends up being too much, you can set it down to two gigs.

  • But I would say Doom or first, because remember, you won't actually have to actually ingest only operate system into this instance.

  • So I would prefer to have Maur Ram to begin with and then realize I don't need as much versus not having enough ram and then having my installation process crash because there's not enough RAM.

  • So I put it to like, three gigs to begin with, and then later I'll show you how you can go back came to that they were going to go to continue from here.

  • It's asking about the virtual hard dressed in this.

  • The VD I do not add a virtual hard disk is an option.

  • Not really sure why you would do that?

  • I guess maybe if you're just setting up a placeholder, that's a possibility.

  • Use an existing virtual hardest.

  • So remember, with these virtual discs like this VD I this is a file.

  • The great thing about virtualization is that you can literally take the entire work school computer, copy it to a USB flash drive and just move it somewhere else.

  • So let's say I was doing that.

  • Let's say I created a virtual machine here.

  • I was doing all experimentation.

  • I was playing.

  • I set everything up.

  • I got I got exactly where I wanted.

  • Then I could copy it to a to a flash drive.

  • Take it to wherever I want to actually run it into a theoretical production environment on.

  • And then I could use that virtual hard drive, basically creating this process.

  • So that's one thing you could do.

  • What we're gonna do here is create a virtual hardness now, So this is a brand new instance.

  • This is a brand new operating system, so creative work your hardest on look like this, and then we'll create.

  • Then it says, What kind of a hard disk final type you want VD I V a.

  • T d or be in decay?

  • I would argue.

  • Just leave it at VD.

  • I this point, if you don't know the difference between these Leavitt of Edie, I will deal with the other ones later you go to continue then The next thing that's going to be asked is a storage on physical hard disk.

  • Do you want to be dynamically allocated or fixed size?

  • What this means is, if you say fixed size, if you say fixed size and you give the hard disk, let's say 20 gigs of storage, then it'll automatically allocate 20 gigs of the hard drive to this virtual machine.

  • So whether you have one file on it or you Philip, the 20 gigs all 20 gigs will be used.

  • If you don't do dynamically allocated, this is pretty cool.

  • What you could do is you can say what the max size you want it to be.

  • So what you can say is, I want this hard disk to be up to 30 gigs in size, and then it will grow to 30 gigs and socks on DSO.

  • That's a way that that you can set how big you wanted to grow, too, so it won't grow any bigger than that.

  • But until it gets to that point, it won't take up much space.

  • So if you give it dynamic, you said it to 30 then it takes five and then it grows and it goes a six and it goes a seven.

  • Then go 89 10 11 12.

  • So this is something I think about one of the reasons why you might want to go with fixed sizes.

  • Let's say you're running multiple virtual machines on this computer and you want to make sure that they don't all grow and then end up crashing the system, right?

  • So So let's say you had Let's say you had I don't know the hard drive with 100 gigs of storage space on it.

  • And so you you made them made dynamic hard drives.

  • And you said you let's say, Put three instances on your system and you put them all to a dynamic hard drive of up to 50 gigs and sighs.

  • Well, if you have three, theoretically, the max is 100 and 50 gigs, but you don't think you'll actually use 150 gigs, and so they're all slowly growing.

  • What happens of a log file gets turned on or something stupid happens, and all your different virtual machines keep growing, and then they grow outside the max amount of space that your host machine has available.

  • Then that could possibly crash the host machine and cause all kinds of problems.

  • So what you might do is you want to say, Hey, I don't wanna have any surprises in the future, so I will make sure it's all fixed.

  • I know I've got 100 gigs of storage space, so I'll make each one of these virtual machines.

  • I'll give them 33 gigs of fixed allocation, so I know exactly what I'm dealing with.

  • So this is kind of one of those things to be thinking about in general.

  • If you have a single machine again, you're doing basic lab tests with Lennox or anything else I would set it to dynamic, but something to be thinking about their.

  • Then we click on Continue, and then we say, What size do we walked?

  • The hard drive.

  • Now again, the important thing is to look at the requirements of the requirements so again, and they default to take gigs, cause back when they're creating these defaults, take gigs with huge galley 10 gigs.

  • I think the exact little big anymore, uh, move onto a bun to desktop.