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  • throwing away old gadgets and smartphones is as bad for the environment as planes and cars.

  • Now the U wants us to fix them instead of throwing them away.

  • We've got the language you need to talk about this story.

  • I'm Catherine.

  • I'm Neil and this is news review Lets him or about this story from this BBC radio report.

  • Typically, people associate greenhouse gases with cars, planes, perhaps homes.

  • But the EU says half of all emissions on more than 90% of species loss caused by extracting and processing resources.

  • The European Commission wants items such as smartphones that rely on these resources to last longer and to be easier to repair.

  • So we're talking about pollution on greenhouse gases course by manufacturing.

  • Now, a lot of people think that greenhouse gutters are primarily caused by human activity, like flying like traveling like kind of hitting your homes and things like that.

  • But the European Commission is looking at some of the goods we use every day.

  • Four examples smartphones.

  • Now, Neil.

  • Yes.

  • How many smartphones have you got in your house?

  • Well, I have to say I've probably got about three old ones and yeah, my wife's got a couple, at least.

  • Yes.

  • And how many do you actually use?

  • Just the one in my pocket.

  • Right.

  • So you've got several smartphones.

  • You only use one of them.

  • The others throw.

  • I'm gonna throw them away.

  • Eventually.

  • Eventually.

  • But then I was sitting in the house with all the other stuff.

  • He should be thrown away.

  • So the You are saying that we've got to stop buying new smartphones to replace old ones.

  • We have to fix them on manufacturers me to make them last longer.

  • Now is not just smart phones is things like clothing and a lot of other things that we buy.

  • And then we get rid of them and replace them.

  • Okay, Well, you've been looking around at this very interesting story.

  • You've picked out three words and expressions.

  • What are they?

  • We're going first to the British fashion industry website.

  • It's called Draper's On the Headline Is new rules to challenge throwaway culture?

  • Throwaway used for a short period and then disposed off.

  • Yes, is a word that's made up of two words.

  • It iss well spotted me.

  • Oh, yes.

  • We have two words here where the 1st 1 is throw on the 2nd 1 away.

  • Well done.

  • And if we put them together, we have one word throw away on the stress is throw away.

  • Throw away.

  • Thank you very much, Neil.

  • Throw away now Throw away is exactly what you think it is.

  • If you don't want something anymore, you throw it away.

  • Usually you put it in the band or you get rid of it somehow.

  • But it needs to get rid of something you no longer want or use.

  • Okay, so I know a word that's exactly the same as that's Come on, then.

  • It is disposable.

  • That right?

  • Not quite.

  • There is a similarity both disposable and throw away.

  • Things are no longer used at a certain point, but there's an important difference.

  • Disposable.

  • You wear contact lenses glasses.

  • Today you will note that I'm wearing glasses.

  • But I often wear contact lenses, which are designed to be used once once and then disposed off.

  • They are disposable.

  • Yes, so you wear them once and you and you get rid of them.

  • You throw them away, but they made to.

  • That's what they're for.

  • Now, if something is throw away, it's not designed to be disposed off after one use, but often people will use something on then, after a few times, because they're bored with it.

  • They want a new one.

  • They want a better one.

  • They want a different one.

  • They throw it away anyway.

  • Even though it's okay, there's nothing wrong with it.

  • They just don't want to anymore.

  • And they replace it now.

  • This is the smartphone issue of you Go only smartphones Your ways is why I told many, Why don't you just use it?

  • Because I can't fix them?

  • There's no there's no screws in the corner.

  • You can't get into the battery case or anything.

  • So you're participating in the throwaway culture.

  • And that's a really good two word phrase that we use throwaway culture because you want to.

  • But you've got no choice, Yes, and it's also often used with another word.

  • Society.

  • Yes, we talk about throwaway society throwaway culture.

  • Now you don't want to participate in your force to some people do all the time, people by We've heard of fast, fast fashion where people buy things, wear them table three times, they throw them away and they get another one.

  • So the throwaway culture is where people.

  • Just use them and get rid.

  • Okay, let's have a summary of that.

  • Okay, Now it's time for a look at our second headline, please, Catherine.

  • Yes?

  • We have BBC news.

  • The headline Climate change.

  • New rules could spell end off throwaway culture.

  • Spell end off.

  • Spell the end off.

  • Indicate that something will stop happening.

  • Why is there no the headline?

  • It's a headline.

  • So the full phrase that we're going to look at today is spelled the end off.

  • But in the headline headline, writers like to take out words like the So it isn't in the headline, but we're looking at Spell the end off his forwards s p e double L.

  • Then we have the th e nd nd on dhe off O f with a single f Then it means indicate that something will stop happening.

  • Yes.

  • Okay, so you just spelled spell, spell spell.

  • Yes, I spent spell to make it very clear Which letters go to make the word.

  • So if you spell something, you really break it down piece by piece, and you make it very, very obvious.

  • How do you spend your ning n e?

  • I l is not an I e m no, no, no, no, no country to popular opinion.

  • Okay, Thank you for spelling out the spelling of your name.

  • If you spell something out, you make it really clear and obvious.

  • You describe something in great detail, You make sure it's everybody understands.

  • You're very emphatic and obvious about what it is you're trying to explain.

  • Now that's spell something out.

  • If you spell the end or something, you make it very clear that something's going to finish.

  • So thing a will happen.

  • And by watching thing A, you know, that thing be isn't gonna happen anymore.

  • Yeah, I used to love records.

  • You did a new vinyl collector.

  • You would buy those big 12 inch vinyl record.

  • I love looking at this, leaving everything beautiful.

  • And then see days came in, CDs came in and they spelt the end.

  • They spelt the end of record.

  • Yeah, it was obvious that records weren't going to last much longer because CDs with cheaper, they were better quality and a lot of lot of opinion.

  • A lot of people's opinion, they like this sound better.

  • They were more durable, they were smaller, so CDs spelled the end off vinyl.

  • Now the proposition off.

  • But you can also say four so well.

  • I mean, CDs may have one temporarily now.

  • Audio streaming, video streaming spell the end for CDs.

  • Okay, so spell Yandong means indicate that something is going to stop now.

  • I saw the other day, Catherine.

  • You walked into the office with an enormous lock.

  • Oh, yeah, It was huge.

  • Great.

  • Making locker is quite expensive and really quite heavy.

  • But I took this lock and I put it on the biscuit.

  • 10?

  • Yes.

  • And that act spell the end for Rob's biscuit fever did.

  • I'm sure we'll come in with a great big, great big pins, I think bolt cutter and get the padlock off.

  • But at the moment, we're back in control.

  • Okay, Let's have a summary slide.

  • You like stories about the environment?

  • We have one for you, don't we, Katherine?

  • We do.

  • We've got a story about a possible solution to plastic pollution.

  • So if you click the link in the description, you go straight there.

  • Okay?

  • Now it's time for our third headline.

  • And now let's go to the Express and star in the UK Government's plastics policies.

  • Failing to tackle route off the problem Root meaning origin or cause.

  • Now, I know the route is part of a tree.

  • And that part of a tree, the bit of the tree That's underground, Yes, that provides all the nutrition, the water.

  • It kind of hold the tree solid in the ground.

  • Without the route, there is no tree.

  • So you can say that the root is a kind of foundation off the tree.

  • Yeah.

  • So what has this got to do with plastics?

  • Well, if you think about the foundation off a problem, you can call the foundation of a problem.

  • The reason for a problem.

  • The route off the problem.

  • So the cause or the origin of something is a route?

  • The headline is saying that the government isn't tackling the loot off the problem.

  • You can't solve a problem if you don't know the cause.

  • If you don't know the route.

  • Yeah, just like you trying to fix your computer knee level.

  • Ah, I I cannot fix a computer and mainly because I find it very difficult to find the root of the problem.

  • So you try lots of different things and you never successful, and then you end up throwing that away.

  • Who's a buck in the cupboard?

  • Yes.

  • Yet about six minutes later, have another go.

  • But if you can't find the root of a problem, you're not gonna be able to fix it.