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  • Aww Yeah! Are you ready to speak English confidently clearly?

  • Let's learn how to do it with the Ellen show!

  • So guys I have a special guest joining me today.

  • Hadar is a pronunciation and accent reduction specialist.

  • And on her YouTube channel "Accent's Way"

  • She helps learners, like you, to avoid common mistakes so that you can speak English clearly and confidently.

  • And then she is actually going to help you to improve your pronunciation, intonation, and connected speech

  • by breaking down a funny clip from The Ellen Show

  • So if you want to be able to speak English more clearly and confidently, I highly recommend that you

  • subscribe to Hadar's channel and while you're over there you can also check out

  • a new lesson that I made with Ellen, so now let's head over to the interview.

  • Hello to the beautiful viewers of learn English with TV series.

  • My name is Hadar and I'm from Accent's Way English with Hadar.

  • Now before we begin, before we even start watching the clip, here's what I'm gonna talk about today.

  • I'm going to talk about intonation the melody of English right, the melody of your speech

  • And in particular, I'm going to talk about rising intonation versus rising-falling intonation.

  • When we go up, and when we go down.

  • I'm also going to talk about STRESS.

  • What words you want to stress in a sentence 'cause it might be a little different

  • than how it is in your native tongue, and lastly I'm going to talk about rhythm

  • in particular reductions of parts of the sentence

  • when do you not pronounce every single word fully and then it sounds like everything is fast

  • and mumbled but in fact it helps you to convey your message in a clear

  • and accurate way

  • So let's watch the clip first.

  • There are tutorial videos that are very popular.

  • You can learn how to do anything at all if you watch.

  • Did you see this headline here

  • This week an 8-year-old boy in Ohio used YouTube

  • to learn how to drive, he took his four-year-old sister to McDonald's.

  • If they were smart they would have gone to Denny's 'cause kids eat free so that was, uh...

  • smart but not all the way smart.

  • Okay, so let's watch the first sentence

  • There are tutorial videos that are very popular. You can learn how to do anything at all.

  • "You can learn how to do anything at all"

  • So, first of all notice the stressed words.

  • "You can learn how to do anything at all" right?

  • So, the way she stresses words is by making the words a little longer, right?

  • All of a sudden these words are a lot longer

  • and also she goes higher in pitch

  • that means she goes on a higher note.

  • "You can learn how to do anything"

  • Once she goes up that means that the word is stressed,

  • and the word is longer.

  • "You can learn how to do anything at all"

  • Do anything at all if you watch. Did you see this headline here?

  • And then she goes into "if you watch, if you watch"

  • that's kind of flat because

  • something else is coming up if you watch and then she breaks and she asks a separate question.

  • Did you see this headline here.

  • Did you see this headline here?

  • Can you identify what the stressed words are?

  • Did you see this headline here

  • So I would say it's SEE and HEADLINE

  • Did you see this headline here.

  • It feels that these words are a little longer and higher in pitch, right?

  • And it's kinda like she puts a little more emphasis there

  • Did you see this headline here?

  • Now, so we have SEE and HEADLINE.

  • notice the beginning...

  • She's not saying "did you see the headline here, right?

  • That's a reduction. Words that are a little less important, they're called function words

  • Now, they're very important right but they're

  • a little less important for you to convey your message like "did" "could"

  • Am, is, are... On, in, at.

  • All those words, so these words are

  • functional words and function words are usually reduced so you can like take the

  • vowel in them and you squeeze that and kinda like reduce it so instead of you

  • you hear ya you connect the two words did you did you did you see the another

  • function word headline here okay so we notice here the content words the

  • stressed words see headline we noticed the function words are a little more

  • reduced did you the and then here is the last word that goes up in pitch and

  • that's the rising-rising intonation this rising-rising intonation at the end

  • headline here is usually associated with yes/no questions questions where the

  • answer is simply yes or no it's not like I'm trying to gain a lot of information

  • you're not supposed to give me an elaborate answer after that now we use

  • this rising rising intonation in many situations but it's mostly identified

  • with yes/no questions did you see this headline here did you see this headline

  • here going up in pitch at the end this week an eight-year-old boy in Ohio used

  • YouTube to learn how to drive an eight-year-old boy in Ohio used YouTube

  • to learn how to drive an eight-year-old boy in Ohio right so we have an

  • eight-year-old boy in Ohio right notice when she goes up

  • used YouTube YouTube is really really stress it's higher than the rest of the

  • words right that's the emphasis that's the point of the message here to learn

  • how to drive then we have learned and drive.

  • 'To' is reduced. It's not to learn how to drive.

  • It's not flat. Not all words receive the same emphasis.

  • We have: to learn, how to, how to, how to,

  • Not "how to"

  • Had to, how to, right?

  • It's actually the beginning of the word 'hat' huh

  • That's what happens to the word how that's how reduced it is

  • huh and then two turns into tuh

  • and then I make the T like a light D

  • had a-- had a drive

  • An eight-year-old in Ohio used YouTube to learn how to drive

  • In terms of melody in terms of

  • intonation at the end

  • We see how she goes up and then down it's not rising-rising intonation

  • she's not saying 'to learn how to drive' right?

  • It's not a question 'to learn how to drive' rising-falling intonation, okay?

  • 'To learn how to drive' rising-falling intonation indicating that's the end of the sentence.

  • You want to think of it as if you put a period at the end.

  • That is the rising-falling intonation, okay?

  • So, when you have a period at the end you go down

  • when you have a question at the end, if it's a yes/no question, you go up.

  • Did you see this headline?

  • 'How to drive' okay?

  • Now before I play the next sentence,

  • I want you to listen closely and try to identify two things:

  • One, what are the stressed words

  • Two, when she goes up in pitch for a rising-rising intonation and

  • when she goes down for a rising-falling intonation.

  • He took his four-year-old sister to McDonald's

  • He took his four-year-old sister to McDonald's.

  • Can you hear that? Four-year-old sister to McDonald's, right?

  • It's pretty repetitive, the stressed words, and it creates this beat affecting the rhythm of English

  • Now, what about the pitch at the end? Was it rising-rising or was it rising-falling?

  • Let's listen to it again.

  • He took his four-year-old sister to McDonald's

  • You got it it's rising-falling 'to McDonald's' right?

  • So, she goes really high in pitch but then she drops all the way to the bottom of their pitch

  • 'to McDonald's'

  • indicating that it's the end of the sentence, there is nothing else coming up right after

  • I mean of course she's gonna continue talking

  • about what she talked about here but it's the end of the sentence the end of the idea.

  • If they were smart they would have gone to Denny's because kids eat free so thatwas, uh...

  • This is a really good sentence to learn about those reductions

  • If they were smart they would have gone to Denny's 'cause kids eat free

  • I'm gonna do it slowly.

  • If they were smart they would have gone to Denny's cuz kids eat free

  • What are the stress words here?

  • if they were smart

  • they would have gone to Danny's cuz kids eat free, so we have 'kids' and then 'free'

  • 'smart Danny's kids free' they were smart they

  • were if they were if they were she goes fast here doesn't the reduced part smart

  • higher in pitch longer the next part they would have gone to turns into they

  • would've gone duh they would have gone duh, they would have gone duh.

  • This is how reduced it is, okay?

  • I dropped a 'have' to 'uh', woulda woulda they woulda gone is somewhat stressed.

  • 'To' turns into 'duh', they would have gone duh, they would have

  • gone uh, they would have gone uh, they would've gond uh, they would have got a

  • Denny's, okay, and then Danny's is stressed. You take your time with it

  • 'Cuz' not 'because'

  • cuz, cuz, cuz, cuz, kids eat free

  • so here you have three words that

  • are somewhat stressed 'cuz kids eat free'

  • they were smart they would have gone to Denny's cuz kids eat free

  • smart but not all the way smart

  • smart but not all the way smart

  • smart first stress word but not all the way, all the way smart so here

  • we really see this idea of rising intonation versus rising falling intonation

  • smart, something else is coming up, it's like you put in a comma there

  • but not all the way smart

  • rising-falling intonation at the end period.

  • So, now let's put everything into practice.

  • I'm going to play it again but this time

  • I'm going to leave you some time to repeat it and keep in mind everything that we talked about.

  • There are tutorial videos that are very popular you can learn how to do anything at all.

  • ...if you watch. Did you see this headline here?

  • he took his four-year-old sister to McDonald's

  • okay that's it I hope you enjoyed it and I hope you found it helpful keep on learning with

  • English with TV series and this time start paying attention to words that are stressed,

  • words that are reduced and your intonation whether you are

  • going up in pitch or down in pitch