Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • want to speed up your language learning.

  • Get access to all of our best.

  • PDF Cheat sheets for free.

  • Just click the link in the description and sign up for your free lifetime account.

  • Right now, American accents these air different American accents that you will hear in TV in movies.

  • And if you visit the USA, perhaps in different regions as well.

  • So we're gonna share and try our best to share what these accidents might sound like.

  • Let's forgive us in advance if it's not perfect Anyway, let's begin.

  • You want to start us off?

  • All right?

  • Uh, well, I guess I'll go in alphabetical order.

  • And my first twenties Boston A nice Boston accent is a sort of classic strong American accent on there.

  • Really famous.

  • The famous thing that Boston Boston accent does is it drops the road IQ are that are that follows a vowel.

  • So the classic example is, if you have a car, you park your car in Harvard Yard, but you don't say it that way, so your pocket car and have a yacht that's the That's the classic Boston example, and that's probably all I can do up that.

  • Oh, I've got another one that my mom used to use for.

  • The Boston accent has the same thing.

  • What's your, uh, which was?

  • Let's go up the 33rd and third Street and listen to the Boyds choice that are sound it totally.

  • It's totally different from the way that we're speaking now.

  • Yes, so but it's hard, I think, if you're not expecting that, no, it's It's a really distinctive here.

  • That's shocking.

  • Actually, it's interesting because I think a lot of accents in the U.

  • S.

  • And a lot of places are often regional right there for a whole region.

  • And sometimes they're very specific, specific to a city.

  • And I think Boston is that case.

  • It's very specific to very small location.

  • This city in the Northeast.

  • Yeah, you think you do see that in movies?

  • Actually a lot, Definitely.

  • For sure.

  • It's interesting to me the way that different accents are associated with different, like stereo types of people who in movies, things like that.

  • So in movies or on television, oftentimes that Boston accent is associated with a kind of like tough, no nonsense attitude, and I'm sure they're tough, no nonsense people in Boston.

  • I'm sure there are people that are not so tough and tolerate a lot of nonsense.

  • That is probably true.

  • True anywhere.

  • All right, I I'm gonna choose.

  • I'm gonna start where I was born and place that I love to make fun of all the time, the Californian accent, I say the Californian accent.

  • But there's not just one.

  • S o.

  • There may be my favorite accent to make fun of is what's called the Valley Girl accent.

  • The Valley Girl accent is known for making all statements sound like a question and having a very whiny manner of speech.

  • There's also this sort of weird thing that seems to be not specific but very common in speech among young women, particularly from California.

  • That's something called vocal fry, where women will, like, drop the pitch of their voice in order to, well, just kind of create a different manner of speech.

  • There a variety of reasons why people do that, and I didn't actually know, but I do it.

  • Ah, I just grew up talking that way, though I never occurred to me.

  • I shouldn't use this kind of speech in a certain like situation.

  • Just I just grew up speaking that way.

  • But in recent years, local fry has been, ah, the subject of discussion on and some things ever.

  • Anyway.

  • Eso a typical California Valley girl, if I can give an example, is like, um, today I was going to work on and I saw this guy and he's like, really, really scary And I didn't know Todo is very, like, whiny way of sharing stories and explaining things not and actually, in that series of example, questions or sorry in that series of statements, nothing I said was a question.

  • But everything had that upward intonation.

  • So those are a few things that are kind of characteristic, um, sort of characteristics among women, uh, this way.

  • But men, On the other hand, there's this image off the surfer dude from California, and it's typically like young men who speak this way, and they'll be like, Yeah, bro, what's up like, let's head to the beach sort of thing.

  • This very how would you describe that?

  • It's like it's It's like if you could imagine your voice being relaxed and yet rough at the same time.

  • That's kind of what it sounds like.

  • Do you ever like to make fun of Californians and the way they speak favorite accent to make fun of.

  • Uh, well, I don't like to make fun of accents as a rule.

  • No, no ideo, I should say to mimic two minutes fun.

  • It's my favorite accent to mimic.

  • It is a fun accent to mimic.

  • And maybe this.

  • I think this accent is a CZ.

  • Well, has certain associations with it.

  • May be a lot of people might associate, um, stupidity or dumbness with a Californian accent.

  • Which is unfortunate because that's not always the case there are.

  • There are dumb people from everywhere, not only California, but this is an accent that often associate that with right, unfortunate right.

  • That's true because of the manner of delivery on also, like apparent like Right now, this is vocal fry.

  • I'm not even thinking about it but like dropping your voice into a lower register.

  • But apparently people associate that with stupidity.

  • Like the chart that people are specifically young women are trying to alter their boys to see more intelligent or something like that.

  • I don't even think about it honestly, is quite interesting, but California has a range of accents, a range of different ways of talking.

  • So that's just one way back to your side of the table.

  • Absolutely.

  • We're still in alphabetical order, which I like.

  • Andi, I am going to do a Chicago accent now for you.

  • Chicago accent.

  • Very kind of stereotypical Midwestern accent.

  • I think there is a wider kind of Midwestern accent, and Chicago accent is maybe a subset of that.

  • It's not just like the wider Midwestern accent, but there's a Chicago accent, too.

  • I don't know this accent super well, but I chose this one because it's an accent that I used to see in one of my favorite Saturday, Saturday Night Live sketches when I was a kid, which were the, uh, the Bears fans, The Bears.

  • They're from Chicago and they love the Chicago Bears, and that's that's the accent.

  • Kind of just draws out.

  • What does it D'oh.

  • Chicago draws out a lot of vowel sounds.

  • A lot of Midwestern accent draws out vowel sounds and makes them a little higher.

  • Uh, on your palate, I guess there's duh bears, bears, bears, so it's a little more like open and back and up with the vows.

  • I couldn't do a Chicago accent to save my life.

  • Chicago, Chicago, Where you go It's hard.

  • It's really hard.

  • Yeah, it's my sex in the Chicago accent has associations with, like, a kind of working class accent.

  • But maybe that's just right.

  • I don't know, right?

  • Yeah, that's a good one.

  • But I couldn't I don't think I could D'oh d'oh!

  • Just I don't want to try saying which more than Chicago Bears, because that's just sort of whatever, right?

  • It's tough to do.

  • It's tough.

  • OK, OK, although north of that, then.

  • So the next one that I prepared is I called it Minnesota.

  • So Minnesota is a state that is north ish of of Chicago.

  • Chicago is in Illinois, the state of Illinois.

  • So this is sort of the same region.

  • But this is further and north.

  • So you're heading towards Canada.

  • Ah, so there are a couple of places like we talked about.

  • Wisconsin is another state that might have a similar accent here.

  • But Minnesota, similar to Chicago, has this very drawn out vowel sounds, and, um, it's okay.

  • I guess we'll just try.

  • And one thing that we all know how to say is like, Oh, yeah, sure.

  • you bitch.

  • Just sure you met.

  • Oh, sure.

  • Oh, sure, Minnesota accents.

  • It's it Sounds very cheery.

  • Yeah, I think I think so.

  • And that's kind of what throws people off.

  • Very friendly.

  • I shouldn't say throws people off, but it's like it sounds kind of joyful just on its own.

  • So anything you say in like a Minnesotan accent, it sounds just more happy.

  • It sounds very sincere to me.

  • Ah, yeah, if I If I hear a Minnesota mom saying, Oh, sure, you betcha, have some hot dish.

  • I know what it's casserole, but they say hot dish dish.

  • Uh, yeah, it's very sincere and warm and friendly.

  • I think they see Yeah, very rounded vowels, right?

  • But I'm not sure exactly exactly how far this accent goes in the region.

  • If it extends into Canada, for example, like Canada is like when we talk about a Canadian accent, we use words like ending sentences with it, that kind of thing, like Oh, yeah, Canada, that sort of thing.

  • But a lot of Canadian accents differ from American accents, too, in the vowels rounder, longer vowels, uh, compared to sort of a General American accent, and I think Minnesotan accent are upper Midwest.

  • Accents are towards that end of the spectrum as well.

  • So I think Minnesota accents are similar to two, maybe a Central Canadian ex e.

  • I think the most famous example of a Minnesotan accent is from the movie Fargo Coen brothers movie, which is Fargo is not in Minnesota.

  • It's in one of the Dakotas right North or South Dakota, North Dakota, for girls in South Dakota, one of the Dakotas.

  • Okay, but that accent is a very classic Minnesotan accent, right?

  • The character issues right, and I was thinking about that, too, and in choosing that accent to describe because And this is part of the reason why I said it sounds kind of cheerful is that that movie is It's a suspense movie.

  • It's ah, it's a murder mystery.

  • But everyone is speaking in this kind of cheerful sounding voice, and that really lends.

  • That kind of gives this really kind of strange, mysterious feel to the film.

  • Yes, there's a good contrast there.

  • I think you're right.

  • I never thought about that.

  • Yeah, all rights anyway.

  • That's a bit about Minnesota.

  • Don't know.

  • Anyway, let's go on to your next run What do you think my last one is?

  • Southern Accent and now Southern accents.

  • Also, there is a lot of variety in Southern accents.

  • Different, uh, states in the South.

  • Different parts of those states have different Southern accents, but there's also a sort of general Southern accent.

  • I'm from the South.

  • I grew up in the South, but I do not have a Southern accent, but I like to try and pick out when I hear Southern accent.

  • I'd like to try and guess where people are from from hearing their accent, but I'm not always right, eh?

  • So there's sort of a general Southern accent in their pockets of specific kind of accents in the South, And I also think there's a big distinction in Southern accents between, like a rural Southern accent and a more urban are or city Southern accent.

  • The city accents are a little bit more saw, their softer, more genteel and the rural accents are twang here, I would say so.

  • For example, a gentle Southern accent would be something.

  • Hey, yo, bless your heart in something like that.

  • Where is the 20 accent?

  • Yeah, let your heart must Sharper, sharper, a little more.

  • Ah, Roadie, baby.

  • Okay, okay.

  • But there is There's a drawl and an elongation and a slowness to a Southern accent.

  • Yeah, that I think is very