Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - I found after they made "Interstellar",

  • some of the folks told me, that when I was

  • on the International Space Station,

  • and I did a cover of a David Bowie tune,

  • and they were trying to light Matt McConaughey's face

  • when he was looking through the windows of his spaceship,

  • they actually looked at that clip of me

  • to see how the light, the actual light on a spaceship,

  • looked, and then they mirrored that

  • when they were lighting Matt's face.

  • It made me laugh that art imitating life imitating art.

  • My name's Chris Hadfield, Colonel in the Air Force,

  • astronaut, flew in space three times,

  • commanded the International Space Station,

  • did two different space walks,

  • used to be a test pilot and engineer, downhill ski racer,

  • occasional guitar player, and we're here today

  • to look at some scenes from different space movies.

  • - [Astronaut] You need to detach.

  • I can't see you anymore.

  • Do it now.

  • - I'm trying.

  • [intense music]

  • [astronaut yells]

  • - Ugh.

  • This is "Gravity", and this is the scene

  • where the space shuttle explorer is orbiting the earth

  • and they're doing repairs on the Hubble telescope,

  • and they go through some sort of asteroid debris field.

  • Okay, well that's a nice concept.

  • And the visuals are great.

  • But what happens is so far from reality

  • that I just, I want to turn my head.

  • First off, this satellite goes whizzing by

  • at about, I don't know, maybe 120 miles per hour.

  • Satellites are going five miles a second,

  • 17.5 thousand miles an hour.

  • How that thing where you can,

  • oh, you can identify the satellite going by.

  • And then, it's like some big dump truck just suddenly

  • put this big pile of rubble just upwind of the space shuttle

  • and suddenly it looks like an avalanche in space

  • has poured in front of this shuttle.

  • And they violate the laws of physics when Sandra Bullock,

  • she's on the end of the big cannon arm, the big robot arm,

  • and it's tumbling, and she releases her little straps,

  • and suddenly, whoosh, she flies away

  • in a while new direction like there was some force on Sandra

  • that wasn't on the arm.

  • How come she has a different gravity than the arm does.

  • And then everybody in the crew, I mean, the dialogue,

  • they're all yelling back to Houston as if

  • somehow Houston's going to help them right here.

  • [astronaut yells]

  • - [Astronaut] Houston, I've lost location on Dr. Stone.

  • - And George Clooney is referring to this other astronaut

  • as Dr. Stone, like they haven't really met each other yet.

  • And he's asking permission from somebody, I don't know,

  • to go and help her out in the, I mean,

  • it's not astronaut behavior, it's not logical behavior,

  • it's so execrable from actual practical demonstration

  • of what the reality of space flight is like.

  • The most experienced astronaut in American history

  • is a woman.

  • It's Peggy Whitson.

  • She's been in space longer than any other American.

  • She commanded the International Space Station twice,

  • she's done 10 space walks, she was NASA's chief astronaut.

  • In this movie, Sandra Bullock has only been an astronaut

  • for less than a year, and when she's faced with a problem,

  • she's panicking and has no idea what to do,

  • and George Clooney is driving around like some sort

  • of space cowboy as the only person that really knows

  • what's going on, and it's like they met when they were

  • out on this space walk.

  • And then it's like, he's trying to pick her up

  • during a space walk.

  • - Prototypes, even for your pretty blue eyes.

  • - What is he even doing out there,

  • driving around in his jet pack.

  • I mean, we don't go outside recreationally.

  • It's so different than the actual people

  • that are exploring space that devote their lives

  • to being astronauts that are actually

  • on the Space Station right now.

  • The wonderful human role model examples we have

  • of people who are doing these things.

  • I think it set back a little girl's vision

  • of what a woman astronaut could be an entire generation.

  • Sandra Bullock did a great job of portraying this character

  • in the movie, but I just think the character

  • that they wrote for her was really disappointing.

  • That's what I would've changed.

  • Get the characters right, get it to represent

  • what astronauts are actually like,

  • and then build the story around that.

  • Don't just make it the perils of Pauline,

  • where she's strapped to the train tracks,

  • and she needs George Clooney to magically appear

  • next to her to tell her which book to open

  • to be able to do the right thing.

  • Real astronauts recognize the seriousness of their job.

  • The fact that it's always life or death,

  • and that we're there as the representatives

  • of 7.5 billion people.

  • Everybody's trusting us to be good at this,

  • to have spent decades getting good at this.

  • If you want to know what a space walk looks like,

  • there's never been a better movie though than "Gravity".

  • That opening scene is magnificent for the visual impact

  • and the beauty of the silent turning world

  • and the resolution of each of the fine things

  • and the lighting, it's wonderfully good.

  • It gives you the raw emotional sense of a space walk.

  • Just don't pay attention to what the astronauts

  • are actually doing.

  • [dramatic music]

  • [computer beeps]

  • This movie is "Passengers",

  • so if you're gonna get on a ship

  • and you're gonna be on it between stars,

  • going to settle some planet in another solar system,

  • you can't be floating weightless the whole time.

  • Who knows what your babies would be like

  • if they were conceived and developed and tried to grow

  • without gravity.

  • Their bodies wouldn't grow right.

  • How do you make gravity if there's no planet nearby?

  • One way of course is just like we do in a little experiment

  • where we spin it in a centrifuge,

  • you can spin the whole ship, and then everybody

  • is pinned against the outside of the ship

  • just by the centrifugal force,

  • and that feels like gravity.

  • If you shut off the spinner, then it would continue to spin

  • for quite a while.

  • There's really nothing to slow the spin down,

  • and that's one of the big scenes in "Passengers",

  • the ship has a problem, it stops spinning,

  • and therefore, everything becomes like

  • on the International Space Station and starts floating.

  • I'm not sure why, when it starts losing power,

  • the ship suddenly starts slowing down.

  • You'd actually have to put big brakes onto it

  • to stop all of that metal from spinning.

  • I'm not sure why the ship

  • didn't just blithely keep on spinning as it drove

  • into the asteroids, but it would've been a worse story

  • if that had happened.

  • Let's say, all right, the ship stops spinning,

  • now everybody's got no gravity,

  • and one of the characters is in a swimming pool.

  • What happens to water without gravity?

  • Onboard the International Space Station,

  • we played with water all the time.

  • You could squirt it and it would just float there

  • in front of you.

  • It naturally, with the surface tension,

  • goes to a perfect ball.

  • That's the easiest shape for it to go.

  • If you had a swimming pool held in place by gravity,

  • and then the gravity went away,

  • the water would have some inertia as the ship slowed down,

  • and it would slosh, but then the water would

  • almost look like a big blob slowly forming itself

  • into a ball.

  • And I think that's quite well shown.

  • And the weirdest thing is

  • if you were in the water at the time,

  • how would you even know which direction to swim?

  • Which way is the surface if there's no up or down?

  • Even if you started swimming one direction,

  • the blob is flexing, and the way you're swimming

  • might be getting further