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  • way before we get started, Let's define what transitioning is.

  • Transitioning is the words and phrases that you use to connect the different ideas in your academic writing.

  • So they air phrases, for example, like furthermore or as the shows.

  • But there are also small references within sentences.

  • They could come anywhere in the sentence.

  • I don't have to come at the beginning of a sentence that link to ideas that have been presented earlier, or they sort of preview or link Thio ideas that are going to be brought up later in the essay.

  • And they are very critical component to the cohesion mark of your Isles writing.

  • So the public version of the band descriptors chart is succinct.

  • It's very concise, and it's very clear on what cohesion should look like at the different bands.

  • So if we look at the box that's given for Band nine, the clear language that's used is that cohesion is used in such a way that it attracts no attention.

  • Today, I thought is an exercise.

  • What we could do is look at a quick framework that I've pulled together that illustrates, you know, a variety of ways that that ideas can be linked on dhe.

  • It also fulfills this need for, um, for linking ideas in a way that's not really noticeable by the reader.

  • So they kind of just fluently link as you read through the text, and it doesn't feel robotic or repetitive.

  • So today we're going to look at this essay question and an essay that I've written in response to this question.

  • So the question reads, Do you feel the money government spend to protect the environment would be better used elsewhere?

  • Okay, and this is a question that was seen about a week ago.

  • So it's It's a very relevant topic.

  • Now I've written an essay and I have removed in this sort of skeleton the parts of the essay that don't really contribute to the to the cohesion of the essay.

  • Okay, and what I've left here is just the language that allows the different sentences to work together, and so you'll sort of see that the language is it works in two different ways.

  • In one way, it will reflect upon information that's already been brought up in the links to the information.

  • So in essence, it links to the information that has come before in other ways, it will cue information to come.

  • Or it will sort of, you know, provide a framework or a structure to the reader to allow them to anticipate certain certain information to come.

  • Now, let me just show you what I mean when I say that.

  • So if we look at the very first sentence okay, s so we have here the world over, typically, not just including that sort of a stock phrase that that you could adopt and adapt into your own writing.

  • But I mean, in this case, we're gonna read governments the world over typically and then something.

  • But then the subsequent phrases you see that the language sort of links back to what was brought up in the first sentence.

  • So there are reasons to supports and refute this practice.

  • Now, the specific word this s O.

  • This, uh, this word is obviously with reference to something that has been brought up before.

  • And indeed, you know, we're talking about the practice that you will see when the when the essay is fleshed out.

  • Okay, so this is a a clear indicator of cohesion in this essay.

  • Now, the final line says using examples from and again, I'm including, you know, this just to show you kind of, ah, stock phrase that you can you can adopt and adapt to your own writing s o the sense that you will see what they using examples from my country, which is Canada.

  • I will discuss both positions before declaring a personal stance.

  • So here, when I say I will discuss Okay, this is a cueing the reader to indicate that I will be bringing up information that pertains to what was declared in this introduction paragraph.

  • Now the both positions is with clear reference to the ideas that were brought up in the preceding sentences.

  • Okay, And then again with before declaring a personal stance.

  • So once again, this is created cohesion because it lets the reader know that I am later in the essay going to be stating my personal position on this topic.

  • So you can see how the introduction paragraph, you know, and just between these two sentences does a lot to create cohesion between what we're going to be talking about in this essay.

  • All right, Um, now let's go to the first supporting paragraph.

  • So a word like firstly is is helpful because it does indicate that there is going to be some sequencing to to the way that the ideas are introduced in this essay.

  • Um, now we go through some more kind of stock language.

  • So, for example, and then we carry on with ideas here.

  • So the phrase, for example, is also you know, it It creates cohesion in that it's a phrase that is used to reference information that's been brought up already.

  • So you know this topic that we're bringing up the topic sentence of this paragraph, um now links into the next paragraph because we're queuing an example.

  • And that's what this phrase does for us here.

  • Okay?

  • Again as well.

  • With such as So again, the use of this and then with reference to information that has come before and just also some other transitional language here s o comma.

  • But it is also And then I think we go into talking about another way in which the point that's been brought up, you know, supports the topic sentence and more transitional language here.

  • So here and the third sentence, we're starting to derive or move towards Sorry, this is the force since moved towards the conclusion that we want the reader to walk away with after they finish reading this paragraph.

  • Okay, so we have, um because such and then something or common among most countries is clear.

  • Why?

  • And then the ultimate conclusion that we want our reader to walk away with.

  • Okay, Now we move into, um, a transition to looking at the, you know, the opposite point of view or an opposing point of view to what we were talking about in this in this first paragraph.

  • And so we're using the word, however.

  • And so now you know, when you look at this, you can you can see that we're writing a discussion.

  • I see here.

  • So the following phrases, despite these benefits and now these benefits is a phrase that, of course, references wth e the support that we brought up in the first supporting paragraph.

  • So this creates a very strong link between the two ideas and this next sentence in and then blank.

  • So as you'll see in the essay, it's in Canada, for example.

  • And then, you know, the example is shared similar something can be seen so similar also accused the reader to making the link between this coming sentence and the sentence before it.

  • Because it's comparing the two ideas together, and it's and it's some labeling them as being similar in nature.

  • Okay, And again, we have transition language, such as which helps lead the reader into a tangible example.

  • And then we use thus and it is clear that.

  • And so all of this is leading to a conclusion that we're deriving from all of the information we brought up in the in this paragraph.

  • Okay, Uh, the concluding paragraph following this examination, what examination we talking about?

  • Of course.

  • This is linking back to the two supporting paragraphs that were brought up Looking at both sides of this topic I support now, This is not just a statement of our position, you know, just just a kind of out of left field statement of our position.

  • As I pointed out earlier, we did make reference to this earlier in the in the essay.

  • So, you know, when we said before declaring a personal stance.

  • So of course, this creates cohesion of the essay level and, um and then so it carries on with But I strongly feel this s O as you see, you will see in this s e.

  • I kind of straddled the position a little bit and ride.

  • Ah, final opinion that is both in agreement and in disagreement with the stance which I don't recommend you do.

  • But I keep getting essays from people asking me to write a tutorial about how to do that.

  • So So I thought it might, you know, just for this one instance include this kind of essay.

  • But as I said in many other videos, it's much easier to either completely agree or completely disagree with your point of view.

  • Then finally, this is S o, of course, with reference to an idea that was brought up in the preceding sentence.

  • And I hope to see it somewhere in the future.

  • And this finishes off the essay with a a recommendation or hope.

  • Okay, so you can see that these different phrases and language patterns really do help link the ideas together.

  • A tw three different levels, Really.

  • I mean, you're linking things within within sentences, you're linking paragraphs together, and you're linking ideas at the full essay level.

  • So the entire thing works is when large cohesive unit.

  • Okay, so, uh, let's get to the activity.

  • So this is activity I've done with you before.

  • So basically, we're going to go through the essay and flesh this out so you'll see the other, the natural language that fits into these blanks.

  • So you'll see a sentence come up on the screen, and then I will delete it, and then three versions of that sentence will be presented to you.

  • And I'd like you to choose the sentence that you you originally read, okay?

  • And so my hope is that in exposing you to these sentences and pushing you to try to remember each of the words that you will commit, you know, accurate grammatical structures to memory and in, in today's case especially, um, accurate cohesion at the band.

  • Nine level.

  • Okay, structures that will allow you to be co.

  • He's for the ban on level.

  • So let's start So the first sentence in RS.

  • Reed's governments the world over typically allocate a portion of their spending to preserving the environment of their respective countries.

  • All right, and take this sentence away.

  • Now, let's look at three sentences and you can choose the one that you just saw governments the world over tend to allocate a portion of their spending to preserving the environment of their respective countries.

  • Governments the world over typically allocate a portion of their spending to preserving the environment of their respective countries.

  • Governments the world over typically designated portion of their spending to preserving the environment of their respective countries.

  • And the sentence you saw originally was this second sentence.

  • Okay.

  • And as with the other activity, all of the sample sentences that I'm sharing our grammatically correct.

  • But it's just an exercise to sort of push you to repeat certain phrases over and over again so that you can reproduce the menu already.

  • So the second sentence we're looking at is there are reasons to support and refute this practice.

  • Okay, let's take that sentence away.

  • All right?

  • And let's go to thes three sentences, please choose the one you just saw.

  • There are reasons to support and refute this practice.

  • There are reasons to support and refute this.

  • There are many reasons to support and refute this practice.

  • Okay.

  • And the sentence you just saw was the 1st 1 here.

  • Lets go and punch that into our essay.

  • All right now the third sentence.

  • Using examples from my country, I will discuss both positions before declaring a personal stance and we will get rid of that.

  • All right.

  • Using examples from my country, I will analyze both positions before declaring a personal stance.

  • Using examples for my country, I will discuss both positions before declaring a personal stance.

  • Using examples from my country, I will discuss both sides before declaring a personal stance.

  • And Thesent, it's you saw was sentenced number two.

  • But that ends.

  • Where s E okay?

  • And the first sentence of our first supporting paragraph.

  • Firstly, government funded protection of a country's environment is beneficial for many reasons.

  • Okay, let's remove that.

  • All right, so which of these did you see?

  • Firstly, government funded protection of a nation's environment is beneficial for many reasons.

  • Firstly, government funded protection of a country's environment is helpful for many reasons.

  • Firstly, government funded protection of a country's environment is beneficial for many reasons.

  • And the answer here is tthe e third sentence.

  • Let's go and put that into our essay.

  • Okay, all right.

  • And let's pull up the next sentence here.

  • Next one's a bit on a bit long For example, in my country, the Canadian government has spent a tremendous amount of money to ensure large swaths of land such as a gun when parking Ontario are inaccessible to resource hungry companies and city sprawl.

  • Okay, and let's remove that sentence now.

  • Can you choose that from these three examples and hope it can fit them all here, For example, In my country, the Canadian government continues to spend tremendous amounts of money to ensure large swaths of land such as Algonquin Park in Ontario, are inaccessible to resource hungry companies and city sprawl.

  • For example, In my country, the Canadian government has spent a tremendous amount of money to ensure large swaths of land such as Algonquin Park in Ontario, are protected from resource hungry companies and city sprawl.

  • For example, In my country, the Canadian government has spent a tremendous amount of money to ensure large swaths of land such as Algonquin Park in Ontario are inaccessible to resource hungry companies and city sprawl.

  • And the sentence you saw was this 3rd 1 here, let's go put that into our essay.

  • Okay, let me pull up the next one.

  • This policy is important because it not only ensures the natural beauty and wildlife of Canada are maintained for future generations.

  • But it also preserves Canadian identity, which is tied closely to the vastness and untainted nature of the land.

  • All right, let's do that hands.

  • Let's look at these sentences.

  • I don't think I'll be able to fit them all.

  • This policy is important because it not only ensures the natural beauty and wildlife of Canada are maintained for future generations, but it also preserves Canadian identity, which is tied closely to the vastness and untamed to nature of the land.

  • This policy is critical because it not only ensures the natural beauty and wildlife of Canada are maintained for future generations, but it also preserves Canadian identity, which is tied closely to the vastness and untainted nature of the land.

  • This policy is important because it not only ensures the natural beauty and wildlife of Canada are maintained for future generations, but it also preserves Canadian identity, which is tied closely to the vastness and unpolluted nature of the land.

  • And the sentence you saw was the first sentence here.

  • Okay, let's pull up another one.

  • Because such values are common among most countries, it is clear why many people the world over support government funded protection of the environment.