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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hi, everybody!

  • Today let's make something warm, hearty,

  • and cozy, and delicious, made with soy beans!

  • It's called kongbiji-jjigae.

  • Jiigae is a stew, kongbiji is soy pulp.

  • When we make tofu, soy beans are

  • soaked and boiled,

  • after that, they are ground very, very finely,

  • including all water. And then put it in the sack.

  • And then squeezed,

  • and then all this creamy white beans

  • go through the sack.

  • But, in the sack, the left over squeezed one,

  • this is pulp, soy pulp.

  • We make stew with this!

  • Especially winter time, this is so, so delicious.

  • This is my most favorite dish that I tasted

  • from my grandmother.

  • Whenever I had a vacation, especially winter vacation,

  • I used to go to her house.

  • Every meal was so delicious,

  • breakfast, lunch, dinner.

  • And sometimes she made this stew, kongbiji-jjigae.

  • We need soy beans.

  • We need

  • around half a cup.

  • Wash and soak in cold water.

  • I just soaked these in cold water for 12 hours.

  • These beans are going to expand like this.

  • We are going to make anchovy kelp stock.

  • I love anchovy kelp stock, because it goes well

  • with this stew, but you can use also vegetable stock.

  • As long as the stock is delicious,

  • you'll make a delicious kongbiji-jjigae.

  • It's like a plate!

  • Dried kelp, dasima

  • dasima, around 4 x 5 inch,

  • Just a square,

  • and seven dried anchovies, that's all I need!

  • Dried kelp and anchovy.

  • Remove heads, and guts.

  • Now so clean, clean seven dried anchovies,

  • and I'm putting these in the bag.

  • Then I will add four cups water.

  • Cover.

  • I'm going to boil this over medium-high heat

  • for 20 minutes.

  • And I'm going to blend.

  • Add one cup water.

  • Very creamy.

  • And vegetables.

  • I must take care of my vegetables.

  • This is a large green onion, daepa.

  • If you don't have this, two green onions would be okay.

  • Green onions.

  • And garlic.

  • This green chili pepper is too large,

  • I think this amount is enough.

  • One green chili pepper,

  • and one red chili pepper.

  • Next, onion.

  • Onion makes it a little sweet.

  • Just press down, half a cup.

  • My rice is bubbling.

  • And, I'll turn down the heat.

  • My rice is simmering and my stock is now really nice.

  • Next, meat, pork.

  • If you are vegetarian, just skip it.

  • Around half a pound.

  • Turn off.

  • The color is a little brown.

  • Let's taste!

  • Good, good.

  • Yum!

  • Yum, yum.

  • One important ingredient.

  • What is it?

  • Kimchi!

  • My kimchi's well fermented.

  • It tastes sour.

  • I need only around one cup.

  • And cut this.

  • I will use this pot.

  • Let's see my rice.

  • Nice.

  • Well done, I'm going to turn off.

  • Let's heat up.

  • Medium-high heat.

  • Sesame oil, around two teaspoons.

  • Garlic,

  • onion,

  • and meat.

  • And I will add one teaspoon soy sauce.

  • jin-ganjang, and ground black pepper,

  • around a quarter teaspoon.

  • Stir this.

  • You just keep stirring around a couple of minutes,

  • until this pork is no longer pink,

  • and then I will add the kimchi.

  • Kimchi has to be cooked, stir fried like this.

  • I would just stir fry until kimchi's

  • a little withered and softer.

  • I will just keep cooking about four to five minutes.

  • Once you add the kimchi, the kimchi brine comes out.

  • So easily you can keep stirring.

  • First time when I saw the kongbiji-jjigae

  • was really cold winter.

  • My grandmother, she's always quiet.

  • Whatever my grandfather said, she never talked back,

  • kind of a grandmother.

  • I never forget this story relating to my kongbiji-jjigae.

  • And one day my grandmother,

  • there was an open day at the market,

  • and said, "oh, you wanna follow me?".

  • Of course, I love to go to the market.

  • Even now, I love to go to the market, you guys too?

  • My grandmother said, "tell your grandfather

  • you need some money to buy some delicious stuff",

  • such as steamed corn or rice cake.

  • So I told him, "grandfather, I need some money,

  • and I wanna eat some oksusu, jjin-oksusu (steamed corn)".

  • My grandfather gave me some money.

  • So I went to the market with my grandmother together.

  • We went to the house where we could buy tofu

  • and she asked, "oh, give me some biji, kongbiji".

  • They gave her a ball.

  • It looked like mozzarella cheese.

  • "Why grandmother buy that kind of stuff?"

  • I was just wondering.

  • Next morning she made such a beautiful, gorgeous,

  • bubbling stew, and...(alarm bell goes off).

  • Five minutes I kept stirring,

  • Let's add stock, one cup, and a half cup.

  • Wow, smells so good!

  • Once I stir fry kimchi.

  • We still have some leftover stock here.

  • You guys can make more, next batch.

  • Add some more water, boil more,

  • and then make one and a half cup.

  • Delicious anchovy kelp stock, and pork,

  • and kimchi, and garlic, onion.

  • It should be delicious!

  • And now let's add.

  • And here, it's bubbling, right?

  • Stir like this.

  • And green onion.

  • Green chili pepper.

  • You don't have to cover this,

  • just let it boil without the lid.

  • You don't have to stir harshly.

  • Like this.

  • What we want is a heavy, bubbly, creamy biji-jjigae.

  • Once the bean is cooked, and we can eat it.

  • And usually we salt with shrimp sauce.

  • You know saeujeot.

  • This is a real traditional way,

  • but if you don't have this,

  • just use fish sauce, one tablespoon.

  • If you are vegetarian, use just one teaspoon salt.

  • Scoop more juice, one table spoon.

  • What do you think?

  • It looks delicious, isn't it?

  • Let me taste!

  • Mmm, mhm, oh my, good, good.

  • I will just turn it off.

  • Green chili pepper, green onion,

  • red chili pepper, add them just before serving.

  • Then I will make it bubbling and serve.

  • Always my grandmother said, "open the table."

  • A Korean table is not like a usual western style table,

  • just you can sit down, you know, on the floor.

  • The table's legs are short,

  • so when you sit down, it's a perfect size.

  • Everybody's sitting around it together and eating.

  • The legs are folded, you can fold.

  • So this is easily, you can store,

  • like between, usually the corner.

  • At the corner of