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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me today is Catherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello Down.

  • Hi, everyone.

  • So what's our story?

  • Well, today we're looking at a story about racism in sport.

  • OK, well, let's hear more about that from this BBC World Service news report.

  • Racism has overshadowed a football match between England and Bulgaria in Sofia.

  • The referee stops the game twice in the first half after Bulgarian fans directed racist chance and gestures towards the black English players Raheem Sterling and Tyrone Ming's.

  • The match came close to being called off completely.

  • England won six nil, so foot bull story.

  • Yesterday, the England football team played a euro 2020 qualifier against Bulgaria in Sofia.

  • Now play was stopped twice during the game.

  • This was due to the fact that some Bulgarian supporters were singing abusive songs, making abusive gestures on the grounds off race towards the black players on the England side.

  • Now that much wasn't completely called off, but it came very close to that FIFA has a three strike rule.

  • 1/3 stoppage could have meant the game being abandoned completely.

  • However, England did win six new.

  • Okay, well, we've got three words and expressions that our viewers can use to talk about this story.

  • What do we have for them?

  • Catherine?

  • We have overshadowed you'd gesture on Dhe as clear as day.

  • Overshadowed.

  • Lewd gesture and as clear as day.

  • Okay.

  • Can we have our first headline then, please?

  • Yes, we go to the Irish Times.

  • First England's win over Bulgaria, overshadowed by racist abuse, overshadowed made to seem less important than something else.

  • Now I see some word building coming up here.

  • You're not wrong.

  • Don't we have two words here over O v e r and shadowed s h a D o W e d.

  • It's all written together as one word overshadowed.

  • Okay, Now this is a passive, isn't it?

  • It is.

  • Yes.

  • You can overshadow something, but we use it in the passive.

  • Something is overshadowed.

  • Okay, so what exactly is a shadow for a clarification?

  • Well, a shadow is an area of darkness caused when the light coming towards that thing is blocked.

  • So you can probably demonstrate for us now.

  • Yes, If I kind of stick my hand up like that and block the light there, you can see that my face is on your face is no darker because your hand is between the light and your face, so that's a shadow.

  • Obviously, we're not using it in the literal sense.

  • But the idea that something is less visible is really important here.

  • If you overshadow something, something that is usually quite good, positive and successful, something which people should be focusing on as well.

  • Yes, I'm usually celebrating.

  • You stopped looking and celebrating at that thing because something bad or different happens that draws the attention away.

  • So it's a negative thing, usually, isn't it?

  • If you are overshadowed, it's normally negative.

  • You don't get the the response.

  • You don't get the attention.

  • You don't get the the praise that you would be expecting to get in this context.

  • Of course we're talking about I mean, England won six nil.

  • Great events, exactly big victory.

  • But actually everybody's talking about the racism, which is a negative thing, exactly that the racist behavior off some of the fans has overshadowed the game, not just the England victory, but just the game itself.

  • So is this a sporting only term?

  • Or can we use this everywhere?

  • No, not at all.

  • We can use it everywhere.

  • Anything that happens that's happening.

  • That is good.

  • Important people want to focus on.

  • And then something bad happens.

  • So you then look at that other thing instead.

  • So, like a disaster as a wedding freeze.

  • Yes.

  • Yes.

  • I mean, people said that, um sadly, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle wedding was over.

  • Shuttled both with the difficulties that she was having with her father.

  • And he did it.

  • He was reluctant to turn up.

  • Was need.

  • Yes, it canceled his attendants.

  • And that cancellation overshadowed the wedding to an extent.

  • Well, let's not overshadow the next two headlines by talking about this one any longer.

  • And we'll move on to our second headline, please.

  • All right, we're going to the mirror.

  • Rough.

  • Barclay appears to make You'd gesture in response to racist chanting after scoring lewd gesture, rude body movement.

  • That communicates an idea.

  • Yes.

  • Now this is the two word expression.

  • The words are separate.

  • The first word is spelled L E W d.

  • You can pronounce it you'd or lewd, that's all.

  • You'd like yours better, You two.

  • Nice gesture.

  • G E S T U R a.

  • A gesture is a body movement, usually a hand movement to communicate an idea.

  • Now we all use gestures all the time as part of communication.

  • Done.

  • I'm sure you will demonstrate.

  • Can you demonstrate a high gesture?

  • Hello.

  • Hi.

  • And you just can you make a happy accepting symbols like I did at the beginning?

  • The program has one thumbs up.

  • Thumbs up is a positive gesture.

  • Thank you.

  • That's always a nice one.

  • Yes.

  • That's a whole body of not your hands in the air hands.

  • Yep.

  • But some gestures are not so positive.

  • And no, no.

  • I mean, some people tend to hold up a hand and then extend one of the fingers.

  • I'm sure you will know which one we're talking about.

  • Yes, that is particularly ruled, often with a sexual connotation.

  • So you'd gesture is a hand symbol or a body symbol that suggests something ruled and sexual.

  • It's meant to be offensive.

  • Certain certain, uh, musicians in their time were rather famous for making lewd Justin often.

  • Yes.

  • I mean, it's something that music musicians often due to get attention or because they're breaking boundaries.

  • Oh, yes.

  • So they say so back in the day.

  • Elvis Presley.

  • It was a favorite.

  • The Elvis, the pelvis.

  • I called him and that they would often but I think sometimes they were required to film him from the waist up.

  • I heard that, too.

  • Yes, because his the lower part of his body was wiggling so much in a very lewd way.

  • A sad people believe something that at the time was considered.

  • Lou, these days would be Please do that work.

  • He doesn't do that.

  • Anybody else?

  • Michael Jackson.

  • There's another good day at the hand on the hand on his crotch, right on the wall that yes, so is it just gestures.

  • The lewd or other things believe you know, you can have You could have you'd behavior.

  • You can.

  • You could make a lute comment.

  • You can conversation.

  • Maybe a little conversation is possible.

  • You can send a lewd message to people, but it's probably not a good idea.

  • D'oh do lewd things.

  • Yeah, no.

  • Unless you want to get into a lot of trouble, you would get into trouble in a lot of circumstances.

  • For being rude.

  • Well, let's move on to our third and final headline.

  • But before we do, are you interested in vocabulary learning and football?

  • Then we have a six minute English just for you.

  • Isn't that right, Catherine?

  • Yes, it is.

  • Now.

  • Did you know that women's football used to be much more popular than men's football?

  • Well, to find out more about that story, just click the link and we'll take you to a six minute English about women's football.

  • Fantastic.

  • Okay, let's take a look at our third and final headline, then please.

  • BBC Sport.

  • Racist abuse in Bulgaria England game Clearers day.

  • Tyrone Ming's as clear as day.

  • Easy to see or understand.

  • Now this is a simile, isn't it?

  • It is a simile.

  • So it's forwards as a s Clear C l e a r us again on day D A y as clear as day.

  • Now the US something ask something else is a really common structure in English.

  • Similes mean that one thing is similar to another thing?

  • Yep.

  • Um, sort of a metaphorical comparison.

  • Yes, it is as fast as lightning.

  • As happy as Larry.

  • As happy as Larry.

  • Lots of different ways of saying that something is, as is similar to something else on dhe.

  • If something's clear as day.

  • Well, day is the daytime is there's a lot of late.

  • You can see things really clearly and easily.

  • So something's Clearers Day.

  • It's simple.

  • It's easy to see.

  • It's obvious.

  • It's easy to understand.

  • Nobody can argue about its existence, and this is what, clear as day the racist abuse the title of Ming's is saying.

  • Everybody could see that this was racist abuse.

  • Your view.