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  • Hi, my name is Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'm going to show you a fun and easy way to

  • improve your English, improve the quality of your English when you speak and when you

  • write. And that's by using something that we call "idiom pairs". So, what are "idiom

  • pairs"? Idiom pairs are two words that we use together and produce a different meaning

  • than when we use those words separately. Let me show you what I mean. What I'm going

  • to do first is instead of telling you the meanings of these words, of these idiom pairs,

  • I'm going to read a sentence and you try to figure out if you understand the meaning,

  • and afterwards I'll explain the meaning to you. Okay?

  • So, the first one: "I searched high and low for my glasses, but

  • I couldn't find them anywhere." Right? "I searched high and low for my glasses, but

  • I couldn't find them anywhere." So what does the idiom pair: "high and low" mean? What

  • do you think? Okay. Well, "high and low". When we say: "I searched high and low", it

  • means I searched everywhere. I searched all over the place; I searched up, and I searched

  • down. So, "I searched high and low." I searched everywhere. Okay?

  • Next one: "Your house is always spick and span. How

  • do you do it?" Okay? "Spick and span". "Spick and span", by the way, can be written with

  • the "k" or without the "k". All right? So what do you think it means if you say to someone:

  • "Your house is always spick and span. How do you do it?" Well, it's a compliment, it

  • means very, very clean. All right? So if you say something's spick and span, it means it's

  • very clean. Next one:

  • "They've been married for over 50 years and have been through thick and thin." What does

  • that mean? "Thick and thin." "They have been through thick and thin" means they've been

  • through many hard times, good times, and bad times; many difficult times, many easy times.

  • "Thick and thin" -- all kinds of experiences. Okay?

  • Next one: "His condition is still touch and go." "His

  • condition is still touch and go." Any idea what that means? Well, that one means that

  • his condition is still uncertain; a little bit risky. The doctor cannot predict what

  • is going to happen. Okay? Next one:

  • "Your English has improved by leaps and bounds." "Your English has improved by leaps and bounds."

  • For sure, when you use these expressions, your English will improve by leaps and bounds.

  • So what do you think it means: "leaps and bounds"? All right? Well, "leaps and bounds"

  • means a lot, tremendously. Okay? So if you say to someone: "Your English has improved

  • by leaps and bounds", your English has improved a lot; it's improved greatly. All right?

  • Next one: "We only see each other now and then."

  • "We only see each other now and then." What do you think it means? Well, "now and then" means

  • you don't see that person very often; you meet infrequently, not very often. Okay?

  • So these six idiom pairs are quite easy. Try to remember what they are, try to use them

  • in conversation, and you might be very surprised to find that people are telling you that your

  • English has really improved. Okay? So, that's it for now. If you'd like to do a quiz on

  • this, please visit our website: www.engvid.com. Thanks for watching.

Hi, my name is Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'm going to show you a fun and easy way to

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Speaking English - How to use idiomatic pairs

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    hhhiii posted on 2014/02/20
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