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  • let the healing begin, Boris Johnson declared today in a victory speech on the steps of number 10 aimed at bringing a fractured country back together.

  • He insisted the focus would be on the N hs, but his landslide victory puts Brexit right back on the immediate agenda.

  • The withdraw bill likely to go before MPs next week and it will put Scottish independence front and center too, thanks to a resurgent S M P.

  • As for Labor, with their worst results since the thirties, the political recrimination Sze begin on the search for a new leader.

  • Let's take a look at the result by numbers.

  • With all suits declared, the Conservatives have 365.

  • M P's Labor has 203 fewer than Michael Foot one in none.

  • In the 1983 election, the SNP will have 48 seats on the Lib Dems just 11.

  • All that means Boris Johnson would enjoy a majority of 80.

  • The Tories have gained 47 seats on the 2017 results.

  • Labor have lost 59 the SNP picked up 13 and the Lib Dems are down one, Boris Johnson, one, just over 43% of the vote only a slight improvement on Theresa May's performance, but Labour took just 32%.

  • With the Lib Dems on 11.

  • The big story Labour's vote share is down by nearly 8% points on especially in his northern Heartlands.

  • The Lib Dem vote did rise significantly, but not enough to win seats.

  • Our political editor, Gary Given, is with me again.

  • Gary.

  • The big significance of last night is that Brexit is now happening.

  • If you have a pro second referendum banner of blueberry with stars on it, put it away in the cupboard, that is not goingto happen.

  • What is gonna happen is Brexit on Boris Johnson is going to move as fast as he possibly can to make sure that the first phase of that the delivery of the divorce bill into law us.

  • Actually technically leaving you happens very quickly, potentially with the second reading of that bill a week today.

  • What he does actually, in terms of the new relationship is an interesting open question because an awful lot of people are wondering where exactly he will take that.

  • Everybody's wondering whether he can remotely keep to the timetable has set.

  • But all of that, getting over the timetable blurring that may be attacking slightly closer to Europe than people might expect.

  • All of that becomes possible because he's a man with a great, big, hefty majority now something we haven't seen, of course, in Downing Street for some time.

  • But the other massive thing about last night is what it does for the realignment of British politics.

  • You've been talking there about what's happened toe Labor's hard plans.

  • The most obvious comparison that we keep going back to to understand last night is what happened under Michael Foot in 1983 when the party reduced to what we thought Waas.

  • It's irreducible Corps Labor now controls only half of the seats that were in that irreducible core.

  • It is an extraordinary transformation of our politics on the seats that they are left with are potentially more vulnerable to other sort of sweets and changes or new political movements that could crop up.

  • We have, of course, a different kind of general election in Scotland.

  • It looks as their constitutional crisis is coming towards us in Northern Ireland, as you said some very interesting changes with the first time unionist not holding the majority of seats.

  • There are occasionally general elections.

  • We have seen them in the past.

  • Where not march actually changes.

  • This is most emphatically not one of those he's back on with the majority bigger, the many and his team had ever dared to dream off.

  • Boris Johnson, now the most powerful prime minister since Tony Blair, and after the queen formally asked him to form a government, he spoke to those voters in the old labour Heartlands who'd given him their votes to all those who voted for us for the first time are those whose pencils may have wavered over the ballot.

  • You heard the voices of their parents and their grand parents whispering anxiously in their ears.

  • I say Thank you for the trust you have placed in us and in me, and we will work round the clock to repay your trust and to deliver on your priorities with a parliament that works for you.

  • Watched by his team, including advisor Dominic Cummings, he called on the nation to come together.

  • I frankly urge everyone on either side of what are after three years, three and 1/2 years after all, an increasingly arid argument I urge everyone to find closure on DDE.

  • Let the healing begin.

  • Ian Levy, the Conservative Party candidate.

  • 17.

  • It was a night of Tory winds in seats.

  • Labor thought it could not lose like live facet law to the drawn out saga of Brexit driving leaves supporting labor backers into the arms of the Tories.

  • But you couldn't some said, sparkle the blame on Brexit.

  • It wasn't just about Brexit.

  • It was so Spider about perceptions of the party and the leadership.

  • Has Jeremy Corbyn cost you your job tonight?

  • Absolutely completely.

  • But I shouldn't be surprised in that, because Jeremy Corbyn and I have very, very little in common.

  • We just happen to be members of Corbin was a disaster on the doorstep.

  • Everyone knew that he couldn't leave the working class out of a paper bag.

  • Now John's developed this momentum group, this party within a party aiming to keep the purity the culture of betrayal goes on.

  • You'll hear it now more and more over the next couple of days, as these this look, cults get their act together.

  • I want him out of the party.

  • I want the mental gone.

  • I think that would be a disaster for the Labour Party on a disaster for the politics wheeled out of Labour campaign headquarters, a whiteboard of Tory games?

  • Was it wiped clean?

  • What did they give up?

  • Writing them down?

  • There were 54 story gains from labor.

  • Jeremy Corbyn announced he'd stand down when a new leader was in place.

  • Process aide said that could take a minimum of three months.

  • He insisted his manifesto was the right one, but the media had been hostile.

  • Brexit was at the heart of labor's disastrous result.

  • I think the issue that dominated this election ultimately was Brexit.

  • Our policies have named some.

  • There are many.

  • Many others I could name were actually all of them individually, very popular.

  • There was no there was no huge debate or disagreement in the party about any of the policies in our manifesto.

  • Theo labor targets that slipped from the party's grasp tonight unites general secretary Land.

  • McCloskey described a manifesto, is an incontinent mess of unbelievable promises.

  • While labor argues about where next back in number 10 Dominic Cummings has been leading the planning for domestic policy.

  • Some in Whitehall worry what he might have in store this morning.

  • cameras caught him offering his hand to the Cabinet secretary.

  • Sir Mark said.

  • Well, no.

  • Well, one thing.

  • Definitely in store.

  • The fast track progress of the Brexit divorce bill after another queen speech next Thursday.

  • The second reading is expected a week today, majority now guaranteed Just as a strengthened Boris Johnson implements a plan more than Islands Gup lows, the party's lost its deputy leader, Nigel Dogs and unionists for the first time no longer hold the majority of Northern Ireland.

  • Westminster seats the lid EMS Jo Swinson had called for this early election and was its biggest casualty, losing her seat to the SNP five months into her leadership.

  • Whether people attacked my vision or my voice, my ideas or my earrings one off the realities off smashing glass ceilings is that a lot of broken glass comes down on your head.

  • On a personal level, I do feel for Jo Swinson it's no easy to lead a campaign on dhe.

  • You have to lose.

  • Her seat is a really, really crew blue.

  • So, yes, I do have a lot of sympathy.

  • All that was well hidden when Nicholas Sturgeon actually heard the news.

  • There was a lot for the SNP to celebrate back up to 48 of the 59 seats in Scotland.

  • The SNP leader says Boris Johnson must now give Scotland a second referendum on independence cools.

  • She believes Brexit will greatly strengthen.

  • Getting Brexit done is now the irrefutable, irresistible, unarguable decision of the British people on dhe.

  • With this election, I think we put an end to all those middle, miserable threats.

  • Of a second reference, Hey insists he wants to meld one nation.

  • But looking at how leave and remain seats voted differently.

  • You see how difficult that might be if you look at the seats that voted strongly for leave 60% plus was much bigger swing to the Tories here if it was up to them.

  • If all the seats behave like these, the Tories would have 118 majority.

  • Now, look at seats that voted strongly for remain in the referendum, and the swings are different.

  • If it was down to them, the Tories would be clinging on with the majority of six.

  • As it is, he's back with 18.

  • A whole new voter base.

  • He must please a timetable for you.

  • Trade negotiations, many think unachievable, massive majority that gives a leader authority toe act not seen in this place some years.

  • Well, earlier, I spoke to the conservative MP Gillian Keegan, and I began by asking her how Boris Johnson can unite the country when the election results suggest it is still bitterly divided.

  • I don't think the votes do suggest it's bitterly divided.

  • I mean, you know, we've been talking about one nation conservatism.

  • We actually represent every nation.

  • We have more seats in Wales.

  • Now.

  • We have six seats still in Scotland.

  • We got seats in the Northeast, the Northwest.

  • We've got seats in the middle and we got seats all over the country.

  • So we represent every part of the country, represent every different type of people in the country as well from every city, different socio demographic.

  • So that's the start.

  • If you're talking about, leave on remain how you unite those people who still may feel they want to remain in.

  • The answer there is to do a sensible Brexit a good deal with the you.

  • Andi, make sure the voices off the four nations, and particularly young people, are heard in the next stage of the negotiation Do you see any problem with Boris Johnson claiming and mandates for leaving the EU when in fact more people voted for parties that wants a second referendum will to revoke than parties that have committed to leave it in our system?

  • If this doesn't give a mandate, nothing ever will.

  • Of course it does, you know, Look, the Parliament has been stark.

  • The British people have basically cleared the way through and said, Here you go, get on with it.

  • We want to leave with a deal.

  • And so what kind of government do you think this is going to be?

  • I mean, because we've heard this before.

  • We heard this from Theresa May, talking about wanting to tackle the great injustices on nothing very much happened.

  • Do you think he will deliver when he says, you know, he wants to address the concerns of those people who lent him their votes, that that is what we all want to do?

  • The Labour Party, another party is trying to pretend or sores, tried to proclaim that they've got superior value sets.

  • Every single person in politics wants to tackle the same issues we have in our country.

  • We just think we've got a better, more credible plan to do it.

  • Do you have any concerns about the other agendas that go along with this, though I mean those sort of rather oblique references in the Conservative Party manifesto to looking at the Constitution, the Supreme Court, their approach to the media, all of those source of things could change at the same time.

  • I don't because honestly, I think what is what defines the conservative heart in the reason I'm a conservative is sensible, pragmatic policies.

  • So the Conservative Party is never going to be extreme.

  • People try to paint us as extreme, but we're not.

  • We're actually a centrist by nature, very centrist.

  • This majority means we will have the ability to be a true one nation conservative government, unlike that way haven't seen for decades.

  • And I'm very excited about that.

  • Do you think that goes for the people around Boris Johnson as well?

  • I don't know that.

  • I guess you're talking about Dominic Cummings and some of those people.

  • I don't know that, but you know, there's a lot of extreme talk in this.

  • In this conversation, it was all really around Brexit on, you know you have very extreme positions like the Lib Dems.

  • Andi, you had very extreme positions like the Brexit party on.

  • You know, they paint Dominic Cummings out to be, you know, somewhere somewhere, you know, extreme as well.

  • I don't see that what he's delivered is a a, you know, a conservative he's helped deliver conservative majority on for people all over the country.

  • You know, his strategy on the strategy that the prime minister had with many other people is has been successful.

  • I mean, you've always wanted to moderate the party's position on Brexit.

  • Do you think there is any problem with the Brexit that is sensible in your terms when there are lots of people who have voted conservative who might otherwise have voted for the Brexit party on one something a bit harder?

  • Can you actually satisfy everybody?

  • Actually, if you look it with three and 1/2 years worth of work that's being done with civil servants with everybody else, it is clear that what you need to do to solve the problem of Brexit is you need to get something that unpick ce a 45 year old relationship without damaging everything on dhe give us the opportunity to build a future collaborative, arrange it with you.

  • That's what we'll do.

  • It's a simple as that, Keegan.

  • Thank you very much, Thank you Well, while Boris Johnson has been talking about unity, hundreds of protesters descended outside Downing Street tonight.

  • Theo Whitehall was briefly closed to traffic in both directions as the crowds waving placards declaring Defy Torrey Rule, began heading northwards towards London's busy Piccadilly.

  • Well, we'll be back here in Westminster later in the program.

  • But now over to Kathy, who's in