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  • just a few days before voting begins to decide the next Labour leader.

  • We're in Dudley North, a Labour seats since its creation in 1997.

  • It was taken by the Conservatives in December as that Red Wall came tumbling down with us.

  • The candidates to be the next Labour leader, Rebecca Long Bailey.

  • She went to Catholic school in Chester on became a solicitor in the Northwest before her elections of Parliament five years ago.

  • Jeremy Corbyn, who she gave 10 out of 10 called her our candidate for leader care stammer.

  • He got into a state grammar school in Surrey, which went private.

  • While he was there, he became a barrister and then head of the Crown Prosecution Service, for which he was knighted.

  • Also elected in 2015.

  • Here's the current bookies.

  • Favorites to be leader Lisa Nandi went to comprehensive school in Manchester, worked in politics on the charity sector before her election 10 years ago.

  • Having failed to bring down Jeremy Corbyn's leadership in 2016 she says she now wants to bring labor home.

  • Thea, our audience tonight is made up of people who voted Labour at the last election, plus party members who will get a vote when the official ballot opens next Monday on.

  • We also have some former Labour voters who the next leader will need to win back if they have any hope of returning the party to power.

  • So let's hear from some of them now in you left labor of the last election.

  • Why?

  • What's the problem?

  • I think there was a failure.

  • Incredible leadership, the policies.

  • We're too fantastical.

  • Foreign policy felt anti Western too often.

  • And there's the culture of bullying within the Labour Party.

  • I'm interested.

  • Is former Labour voter about who's gonna get my vote back when you say lots of credible leader?

  • What do you mean?

  • I don't think the leader was authentic.

  • I don't think he was integral.

  • I don't think he was honest.

  • Okay, how about you?

  • Home?

  • The vein.

  • I have been a life longer labour supporter who sadly voted conservative this time because of Brexit.

  • I did it with a very heavy heart because my dad was a miner for 50 years Labour Councillor, I went into the ballot box and put the Exxon and said Sorry, Dad.

  • And so I want to know how you're gonna win me back.

  • Sorry, it's emotional for, isn't it?

  • Is emotionally.

  • It's very hard thing to do to, you know, you feel like a traitor to you.

  • It's a mining community.

  • I'm from Canada in the West Midlands.

  • So it's just you just feel awful.

  • But I was a slave outer, and I didn't get from the Labour Party that you were gonna have support me.

  • All right, well, let's see who can win you back.

  • Let's get our first question.

  • Who is for which is from Paul Knoll pulling?

  • Um, I'm a mental health nurse on a trade union rep over in Liverpool.

  • My question to you is, Are we going to be wise or learn from our mistakes?

  • Or would be or we try Corbin ism again?

  • Rebecca Long Bailey suffered one of the most devastating defeats that we've seen in 100 years, and we lost seats.

  • Light Lesson Dudley North on right across the West Midlands.

  • And there were many reasons for this defeat.

  • 52 out of 54 seats that we lost.

  • We leave seats.

  • What?

  • We also need to recognize the other myriad of reasons as to why are voters lost trust in ALS We had a transformational policies in that manifesto.

  • What, no message that brought them all together.

  • We weren't trusted on issues such as tackling anti Semitism, being united as a party.

  • And then there was dealing with media attacks against our leader and indeed, the policies themselves.

  • But ultimately there was Brexit, the elephant in the room.

  • No, I'm from a leave constituency, and I could feel the anger from my voters.

  • Many lead voters thought we were trying to overturn the results of the referendum and weren't respecting their wishes on at the same time.

  • We're playing games in Parliament instead of listening to our communities wanted.

  • We can't make that mistake again.

  • We saw that that lack of trust took down so many other things with it.

  • We were the party with the policies to make people's lives.

  • But Paul's asking you about Corbin is realised.

  • That Paul is asking about Corbin is, um, which bits of Corbin is, um, will you ditch in terms of the transformational policies?

  • I won't apologize for wanting to make my community's life better on the life of everyone else in the United Kingdom, but for our policies to succeed, we need to have a message that brings people together around aspiration abound, raising or everybody's quality of life.

  • And unfortunately I think in this election campaign we didn't explain our policies on, we didn't prove that we were trying to improve the quality of life.

  • Okay, kiss Tom.

  • Well, they ask the questions we've got to learn because we're all searching for the reason we lost the last general election.

  • We found a number of reasons from the audience that we can all take up and we will.

  • But we've lost four in a row.

  • We've lost four elections in a row.

  • And if we lose the next one probably in 2024 then of the Labour Party, our party will be out of power for a longer period than any time since the Second World War.

  • Now, if you're in the Labour Party, if you want to leave the Labor Party to change the lives of millions of people for the better, we gotta focus on winning that general election.

  • The full reasons that were given in the contributions earlier.

  • But before that, we're coming up on the doors.

  • If we're honest about it.

  • The leadership of the labour party fairly or unfairly, because I do think was a media campaign that vilified the leader of Labour Party.

  • Brexit came up.

  • Of course it did.

  • It came up in different ways, to be honest, because what was said in place like Dudley was different.

  • What was said in Scotland it was not your fault.

  • Money come back that the manifesto overload.

  • I think people work so much saying, I don't like what's in your manifest because there was some good stuff in it.

  • They just ought to have gone to a tipping point where they couldn't believe it.

  • And I'm very sad to say, particularly some areas.

  • Anti Semitism came up both as a values issue on a competency issue we gotta tackle or each of those.

  • But we've also got to recognize that none of those on their own explain why I've lost four in a row.

  • So it's actually an even deeper soul search.

  • I think thing just this idea identify one thing that went wrong in the last election.

  • It was always otherwise.

  • It was plain sailing.

  • I personally think is wrong.

  • It's a deeper soul searching that we need.

  • But you all say leadership came up.

  • You don't say what was wrong with it.

  • What was wrong with Jeremy Corbyn's leadership?

  • Well, I think firstly, I do think he was vilified in the press and certainly when I knocked on doors, what was coming back at me with some of that Philip he wasn't wrong, but now I'm not saying that.

  • What I'm saying is it came up and part of it came up with vilification.

  • But on Jeremy Corbyn, I think it's fair to say that what he brought to the Labour Party in 2015 was really important because he made it clear that we're a party that opposes cuts to public service is that his anti austerity on has a green new deal that's hard wired into everything we do on this, A tendency in political part of any organization.

  • When something goes wrong to say everything must be wrong, then we better forget it'll.

  • I personally think that's a mistake.

  • We build on the important foundations.

  • But the manifesto that really matters is the one in 2024 we'll get.

  • We must persuade people with that Lisa Nandi, will you leak organism behind?

  • Well, I think this is X essential for the Labour Party and I launch my campaign by saying We change or we die Not with any pleasure, but because I've heard the emotional outpouring that you just gave voice to so perfectly for 10 years now in my constituency and Wigan on, people are looking at us and saying This is really the last chance We've been losing for a long time.

  • 2010 2015 2017 But 2019 was no ordinary election.

  • Dudley Sandwell, Stoke.

  • Mansfield bowls over Get Ling.

  • These are places where labor runs through people's DNA as much as their family history.

  • On the fact that we got to the point where we were going around doors with people saying Not you, not now, not this time that we had people voting Tory in order to tell us that we had to change.

  • That was a really moment for us.

  • We have an unpopular leader that is true and we have an unpopular leadership team was unpopular.

  • He was unpopular for a number of reasons.

  • I think that the main underlying sense was that he just wasn't four people on.

  • He wouldn't stand up for people, but let me say this that that comes at the long end off a process that has been happening in the Labour Party for 40 years now.

  • For decades, what we've seen is industry disappearing from many towns across this country, young people having to leave the scars visible across our high streets and our communities.

  • And in the face of that, a political system that has largely shrugged it shoulders and said, This is progress.

  • I want you to know that I have heard you on.

  • I will make it my mission to bring labor home to you.

  • Pull you.

  • Are you hearing what you want to hear?

  • I am from leasing and I think we need to move it forward.

  • I was knocking on doors in West.

  • Well, Andi people were saying exactly the same.

  • It was just totally, totally disarmed on.

  • It did get quite got quite upsetting to know after street after Street, you're getting told that people didn't want to vote for Labour anymore.

  • Is there water policy that you would drop from this manifesto?

  • Well, there were a number of policies that weren't deliverable with your drop, there's not one that I would drop, and I'll explain why, Because there were policies that were deliverable within five years that would go into the manifesto.

  • So Green Industrial Revolution, for example, investing in our education service, what they were, all the policies that were part of a longer term vision.

  • So the four day week is a critical example of that would never have achieved that in five years.

  • It was a long term aspiration after we'd improve productivity through investing in an industrial strategy.

  • And when we've secured trade union representation in our workplace is what put it in the manifesto on packaging it in a way that we could deliver it under the next government confused people.

  • And I think that's why we need t packaging.

  • Exactly.

  • Think the way that we package our policies.

  • But I just want to come back on a point that that's been made about continuing.

  • Corbin is, um, I would say this to any labor vote for Labour Party member.

  • There's no such thing is Corbin is, um, there's our labor values.

  • We believe in building more council homes.

  • Investing in our future is through education and industrial strategy.

  • That's socialism.

  • That's not corporatism.

  • We shouldn't throw away those policy holder question now from Tameka Smith is from Birmingham.

  • Uh, Father mignon for Caroline Flax death.

  • What do you think that says by modern Britain?

  • Kistane was it?

  • What do you think of modern Britain?

  • I did following on from Caroline.

  • Flax.

  • Death?

  • Yes.

  • What did you think it says about modern Britain?

  • Well, I think, firstly, it's tragic, and all of our thoughts, I think, have to go to her friends and her family.

  • I think it really shook the whole day.

  • Shit.

  • I think it tells us a lot about social media and about the media.

  • There is just yards of abuse on social media, and it's about time that those that provide the platform took responsibility for what's on it.

  • This has been going on a long time.