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  • (knocking)

  • (bell ringing)

  • - Come on in!

  • (upbeat music)

  • Salary Negotiation, phew.

  • You did it, you've just landed your dream job

  • after so many phone calls, hundreds of resumes submitted,

  • dozens of interviews and finally, you got the job.

  • And now you need to negotiate your salary.

  • Maybe you are a little bit scared, little bit afraid,

  • little bit intimidated.

  • Or maybe you've been with the company for some time now

  • for a few years, and now you want to go in

  • and talk to your employer about a higher pay,

  • a higher salary.

  • What do you do?

  • You see most of the information out there

  • is sharing with you how do you negotiate salary,

  • is coming from an employer perspective.

  • Today I'm going to do something very different.

  • I'm going to share with you coming from a CEO perspective

  • how do you negotiate salary?

  • How do you talk to a CEO, how do you convince a CEO?

  • How do you read their mind?

  • You see, the problem with most employees is,

  • they either ask for a salary increase too soon

  • meaning they have not established a track record,

  • a performance record, what they have done, too early.

  • You see you don't get higher pay because you demand it.

  • You get higher pay because you deserve it.

  • Or they ask for it too late,

  • meaning they have been with a company three, four, five,

  • six, seven years but very little increase in pay.

  • So you don't want to do it too early,

  • you don't want to do it too late.

  • You see as the creator of High-Ticket Closer program,

  • it's one of the programs I teach to people around the world,

  • teaching people the art of closing.

  • How to get people to say yes more often to you.

  • I'm gonna take some of those ideas and I'm gonna teach you

  • how do you actually close your CEO.

  • How do you close your supervisor.

  • How do you close your employer to give you higher pay.

  • Salary negotiation tip number one,

  • do not try to negotiate salary increase in text or in email.

  • You see most employees, they're afraid, they're afraid

  • to sit down face to face or get on the phone

  • with your employer, talk about your pay increase,

  • because they lack confidence, they lack self-esteem.

  • You don't want to do that, because when you ask for salary

  • when you're negotiating salary,

  • when you do it through an email

  • it's very easy to communicate the wrong way.

  • It's very easy to come across too aggressive.

  • Maybe that's not your intent, but reading,

  • you cannot communicate your tone, your emotions.

  • So do your very best, if you could, do it face to face

  • or do it through a telephone.

  • Now you've got all the tools working for you

  • instead of working against you.

  • You can use your emotions, you can use your tonality,

  • you can use your body language to communicate.

  • Eye contact, to demonstrate, to show your confidence,

  • you need to be confident when you are going

  • into a salary negotiation.

  • So don't be afraid.

  • You wanna practice ahead of the time.

  • Right?

  • To practice multiple times.

  • Maybe with your friends, maybe with your coworkers,

  • your family members.

  • You practiced that ahead of the time.

  • And when you go in there, you've done it dozens

  • and dozens of times.

  • You're ready, whatever objections that you may face,

  • you're ready to go.

  • - I'd like to report a boom, yes.

  • For HTC, I would like to thank everybody

  • for your support, Mr. Dan Lok for the knowledge,

  • Desmond, Tina, all the team and of course to family

  • without you this wouldn't be possible.

  • - My name is Santino Carangi and I am here

  • to celebrate my first three booms

  • of being a High Ticket Closer.

  • So thankful for this course,

  • not only does it give you a high ticket skill

  • or a high income skill,

  • what Sifu teaches you is for life.

  • I am so excited, you guys can do it,

  • keep up the training, keep up the hard work,

  • believe in yourself,

  • kick lower self in the balls, okay.

  • This is your life, go kill it.

  • We are in this for life; HTC for life baby.

  • Season nine fam signing out, best of luck to you.

  • We got a billion sales,

  • let's crank it to two billion baby, come on,

  • you are closer than you think.

  • - Salary negotiation tip number two;

  • come to the meeting with facts and not feelings.

  • You see, most employees they make this mistake,

  • they come to the meeting,

  • sitting down with the manager or CEO

  • and they say something like this;

  • well I feel like I have been around a long time,

  • I feel like I've been contributing,

  • that I feel like I've been working hard, and then,

  • I feel like I deserve more pay.

  • That does not work, because that's feeling.

  • Well, we don't care how you feel, you gotta come

  • to the meeting with facts.

  • What have you done?

  • You should do your research ahead of time.

  • What are some of the contributions you've made

  • to the company?

  • So when you sit down with your employer,

  • you're not just talking about feelings,

  • you're presenting, kind of almost like a case,

  • like a lawyer, and let's say hypothetically

  • you are a social media manager.

  • You manage the company's social media account.

  • You go to the CEO with facts and say

  • okay since my employment here, here's what I've done.

  • I have grown the company's Instagram account

  • by 527% since I was here.

  • Here are the things that I've done.

  • The Facebook page, using my social media strategies

  • and my contribution this is what,

  • how much money I have made the company,

  • how much money I've saved the company.

  • Now the CEO may or may not know these things,

  • so when you present a case, now you're speaking from facts.

  • You are demonstrating,

  • look these are the contributions that I have made

  • to the company in the last one year,

  • two years, things like that.

  • Or, if this is a brand new job it is exactly the same thing.

  • Now you're presenting what are some of the things

  • that you could do.

  • Right, what are some of the things that your employer,

  • new employer, could expect from you.

  • You are going in instead of well, I guess it depends

  • on what you want me to do

  • and I'll do my best to do it, no,

  • you're saying these are things that I think we could do.

  • This is my plan.

  • This is how I'm planning to make the company more money,

  • this is my plan to generate more revenue,

  • this is my plan to bring in more customers,

  • this is my plan how I could make things better.

  • You see the difference.

  • So come to the meeting with facts and not feelings.

  • Salary negotiation tip number three,

  • Ask questions, don't make statements.

  • During a negotiation you don't just want

  • to keep making statements.

  • Because it will sound like and feel like you are justifying.

  • You're saying, oh, here's what I've done,

  • and here are the things, and here's what's going on,

  • and all those are good, you're presenting your case,

  • but you always want to be asking questions.

  • One of the things I teach all my students,

  • all the professionals that I mentor, is this;

  • Whoever asks the questions, controls the conversation.

  • So you wanna be asking leading questions,

  • discovery questions, probing questions,

  • you're asking your employer, by getting more information,

  • by kinda gauging how they're feeling

  • about the different requests that you might have.

  • Instead of just making a statement and then

  • it's very easy to turn in to an argument

  • or some kind of conflict

  • when you're just throwing statements out there.

  • But when you're asking questions

  • it would feel much more like a collaboration effort;

  • that we're on the same page, right.

  • As employee employer we're on the same page,

  • how could we make this work?

  • So, ask questions, don't make statements.

  • Salary negotiation tip number four and that is

  • set the agenda.

  • Don't be afraid to set the agenda.

  • What that means is, where is this gonna go,

  • what is the purpose of this meeting,

  • what is the outcome,

  • what are we trying to accomplish?

  • As the employee you wanna set the agenda,

  • set the tone, right.

  • What are we trying to accomplish here?

  • What is the outcome we want from this meeting?

  • So you could say something like this,

  • I'm gonna give you a little script;

  • Mr. Employer, you know I'm very excited

  • to be joining your company,

  • I'm truly excited about this opportunity,

  • and I look forward, very much look forward

  • to working alongside with your amazing team.

  • Do you mind if we talk about compensation for a second?

  • See how I ask a question?

  • Oh, not a problem, shoot.

  • Talk about compensation.

  • You see, Mr. Employer, based on my research,

  • for someone with highers, with my background

  • and credentials and my skill sets,

  • the market rate is X-amount of dollars, this much per year.

  • How do you feel about that?

  • You see how I'm asking a question,

  • how do you feel about that?

  • Would you be comfortable with that?

  • And then right from there the CEO, the employer,

  • will say well, you know what,

  • yeah that's kinda what I'm thinking, as well.

  • Or they might say that's a little bit more,

  • that's a little bit higher than what we have budgeted for.

  • But then you're not guessing,

  • you're not afraid to say

  • hey this is what the market rate is,

  • this is what industry rate is, how do you feel about that?

  • That's it.

  • You set the agenda.

  • And you go from there.

  • Salary negotiation tip number five,

  • and that is don't be needy.

  • Needy is creepy.

  • You don't wanna sit down,

  • face to face with your employer,

  • and be all needy about what you want.

  • That is a big turn off.

  • So do not use words like, oh I want, or I need,

  • I see this a lot.

  • Your job pays you $50,000 a year,

  • and you actually wanna make $55,000 dollars a year.

  • So there's a five thousand dollar gap.

  • Instead of saying oh, I need another $5,000

  • a year for my position, right.

  • Or I want big vacation pay, I want overtime,

  • or I need this and I need that,

  • it's a big turn off for the employer.

  • Nobody gives a shit what you need, right.

  • What you wanna do is you want to ask questions with finesse.

  • Be on the same page.

  • A much more powerful thing you could say is,

  • I would be more comfortable with.

  • You see the difference,

  • I want this, I would be more comfortable with.

  • So example.

  • Let's say the job you want $55,000 and the job pays $50,000.

  • First of all you could say well,

  • is there any flexibility with that?

  • Is there any flexibility with that?

  • See how powerful that question is?

  • And then you could say that, you know I would be,

  • I would be more comfortable with 55K a year.

  • Would you be comfortable with that?

  • How do you feel about that?

  • Do you hear the difference?

  • Don't be needy and you wanna be neutral, right.