Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • How many hamburgers have you actually eaten?

  • You think?

  • Probably the last 15 years of hard core research.

  • Probably 12,000 burgers.

  • Oh, my.

  • For some people, burgers bring some mind the perfect proportions of emoji keyboard for the familiarity of the Golden Arches.

  • But Fanboys like me, the beauty of the burger is in their differences.

  • No one understands the nuances of burgers across the country like Burger Lord George Moz, who's bad ass book Hamburger America became the Holy Grail for Burger Fast.

  • Today I'm heading to his house in Brooklyn for a crash course in three regional burger styles.

  • So going through my burger journey, I'm starting to figure out like burgers are kind of like barbecue, like there's Carolina style barbecue.

  • There's Texas or Santa Maria Sol barbecue, and a lot of people don't know that burgers were the same way.

  • There's like a bunch of regional differences.

  • I mean, there must be, you know, around 100 different that I know of 100 different regional varieties of hamburgers in America, and each one is a little piece of history that's attached to the original American hamburger.

  • What's the history of of the original burger in America, you can go back as faras, 13th century Russia, the Tartars and the Mongols.

  • Apparently they would ride, and they would take bits of mutton and put under their saddles rodeo today it would tenderize the meat and take it out.

  • Needed somehow the wrong button made its way across the Baltic Sea in Germany and then became raw chopped beef.

  • And it was in Germany for the first time.

  • They actually started to cook the beef and serve it on a plate and call it a Hamburg steak because it was mostly served in Hamburg as people emigrated and left the port of Hamburg, they would end up in New York City at the base of Manhattan, But they would find yet again, Germans selling Hamburg steak from the turn of the century, the popularity of the Hamburg steak had grown so much that it was being served at state fairs becoming portable.

  • So someone said, Why don't we take Hamburg steak and put it on bread?

  • And that was the beginning of the hammer.

  • Bam, yeah, in America, the rest is all history.

  • That's what I've learned is that it's really not about toppings.

  • I mean, anybody could take topping to put him on a burger.

  • But in America, it seems like in the original pockets, it's about method, right?

  • It's about how the burgers made gonna make three regional burgers today.

  • Okay, Gonna make the deep fried burger from Tennessee Oklahoma fried onion burger and the steamed cheeseburger from Catic.

  • It awesome before the days of blacktops, right?

  • Or drains and catch bin think cooking skillets and the skill it would eventually fill up with beef tallow.

  • They realize that they don't have time to dump it out.

  • It's too hot.

  • Don't just keep going.

  • And they realized after they, after a while, that people like the flavor of the deep fried meat.

  • Just one place to go to in Tennessee called dyers.

  • They actually had the oil the same grease in the pan for over 100 years.

  • Wow, infinity.

  • Japanese people have that with their yakitori sauces, like it's a continuous that exactly yet, like that's where love comes from.

  • So measured scoop marble surface only because this is what they use it.

  • Dyer's.

  • I don't know what for 100 years of using marble.

  • It's relatively inexpensive.

  • You can find this for like a couple.

  • But this is This is a $4 piece of marble from home.

  • It's a sample from the vote.

  • You get smashed, press it down like this gets that thin.

  • Yeah, so we try to gently scrape it off here.

  • There you go.

  • And it gets here.

  • Yes.

  • You know, it cooks very fast, right?

  • But it's drying.

  • It's developing a crust.

  • Exactly.

  • It's pretty much done already.

  • Already?

  • So that's what they do.

  • A dyer, Tennessee.

  • Take the cheese right gently.

  • Take it back into degree somehow.

  • You want?

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • Melted.

  • He's out of the booth.

  • Bad.

  • Uh, see.

  • Look at that.

  • Actually pointing right on south of that.

  • A couple of pickles in here.

  • This should be a double 3 75 Boyle, we're talking about, like a little bit over an eighth of an inch thick.

  • She's on there You go that far, you slide it on their back and we D'oh, just this part is blowing my mind.

  • I'm not I'm not the best, but that's pretty good.

  • There it is.

  • You did it?

  • Yes.

  • That is just a thing of beauty.

  • Go for it, man.

  • This is so good.

  • This doesn't have ketchup.

  • Mustard?

  • No mayo.

  • You can if you want, but you do.

  • Doesn't need it.

  • I mean, Greece is a kind of the cheese.

  • Yeah, it's almost like if cheese was, like, pouring into all the crevices of the beef.

  • Oh, my gosh.

  • They keep their traditions alive in tennis, I feel like we just broke two Vinci's code on, like, what's gonna be the next level of Burger Trend in America, which is due for everything.

  • All right, George, you took me in a Tennessee where we're going next.

  • We're gonna move over Thio Oklahoma.

  • So, what's going on?

  • We got all this heavy machinery here.

  • Wear goggles, the Oklahoma fried onion burger.

  • Okay, it sits in the center of what I like to call the Burger Belt of America.

  • There are some of the best burgers in America could be found from Texas South, all with north to Wisconsin, Minnesota.

  • And so, of course, that makes Oklahoma the buckle.

  • It makes perfect sense because some of the best primary source hamburgers can be found in Oklahoma, unaffected by time trend.

  • Anything.

  • The trick to the Oklahoma front of your burger is thin sliced on your radio.

  • Do this.

  • Girls have to go and I can't do without God.

  • It's impossible safety first, guys trying this at home don't try to be a hero because then it ruins the next 10 minutes.

  • A cookie.

  • You can't see the thing.

  • I tell people.

  • If you're making onion juice, just feel one step further, and then you almost ready could see through the thing.

  • Look, so you've made onion ribbons on you.

  • Get a scoop of meat, right?

  • Put it in the pan.

  • A little bit of salt.

  • Here's the Here's the cool part.

  • Watch this.

  • Ready?

  • Yeah.

  • I love all of the onion juice will actually render out.

  • You need a heavy special because this thing has to be smashed just right.

  • We actually take this.

  • We're gonna push this.

  • But then, like a moment of its life here, that's it.

  • The onions are marrying with beef like that.

  • I don't see the cheese is marrying with Be right.

  • This came about because there was a time when there was people don't have enough money to pay for just having a beef all beef burger, right?

  • We had it from this side for maybe a minute and 1/2 we always do.

  • Cheese on flip.

  • This is something that I myself, all always is.

  • This all rides.

  • It's all it's all becoming sort of.

  • Ah, hamburger country going?

  • Yeah, Second bunch of burger Magic happening again.

  • You're butting into history.

  • They're very important part of American.

  • It's always like ugly, beautiful.

  • It's like the William Dafoe burgers amount.

  • Like I've cooked with onions my whole career.

  • I've never really like having onion that tasted that way because it's usually caramelized.

  • Low and slow are fried crispy.

  • Withdraw your rob.

  • This is like, ah, hybrid between both The beauty this burger is, it is the sum is greater than its parts.

  • Oklahoma, yeah, knows what they're doing.

  • Thing is the Connecticut steamed cheeseburger right?

  • It exists.

  • Only within about a seven mile radius is Geographic Center of Connecticut.

  • What do we do?

  • It?

  • It's a bit of an anomaly.

  • In the 19 thirties in Middletown, Connecticut, place called Jack's Lunch.

  • So there's a reservoir on the bottom, which is boiling water, right and then on the inside have a shelves with trays going here.

  • This slide in and they cook the meat the cheese separately and then comes out and goes on a bun.

  • That's serious.

  • Serious business.

  • They're placing.

  • Dedicate this place.

  • Been around 90 59 called Ted's right.

  • So I could get five This from tense if you talk to them.

  • You're nice.

  • Don't tell you the guy down the street.

  • No, no, no, no, no, e, no.

  • You gotta get into fitted.

  • It is This is a gift.

  • Like I'm Asian.

  • So steaming meat.

  • You know, it's natural, right?

  • Makes the dumplings.

  • It makes sense to you.

  • And also, we have a very large block of Vermont cheddar.

  • It's a very specific side has to fit into this thing.

  • So we're gonna cut off blocks.

  • That goat would go into the steaming pans of this trade.

  • We'll get beef.

  • So we're gonna pack beef in here.

  • Straightforward, Just straightforward.

  • Chuck, it's a very odd way to make a burger.