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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we give you the language from the latest news stories and tell you how to use it in your everyday English I'm nail and joining me Today's Catherine Catherine.

  • Hello, Neil.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • Tell us what our story is.

  • Well, today we're hearing a story about some food that might not be as bad for us as we originally thought.

  • Food that's not as bad as we originally thought.

  • Okay, let's hear more about that from this BBC news bulletin.

  • Sausages and bacon A back on the menu after an international team of experts concluded there's little evidence that eating red and processed meat increases the risk of cancer.

  • Public health body say the findings undermines sensible eating advice.

  • So food that we're talking about is red on processed meat.

  • Now we're not talking about the effects of meat production on the environment.

  • What we're talking about is the effect on the human body.

  • Now, science has told us for a number of years now that we need to limit how much red and processed meat we eat because it's bad for you.

  • However, There's a new report that says there's actually little evidence linking eating meat and processed meat to cancer in particular.

  • Um, I'm not.

  • Everybody agrees with this.

  • Some public health bodies are saying this report goes against the healthier eating advice that they've been given.

  • Okay, well, you've been looking around at this story.

  • You've picked out some vocabulary that's useful.

  • What have you got?

  • We have back on the menu raising eyebrows on dhe go cold turkey back on the menu, raising eyebrows and go cold turkey.

  • So, your first headline, please.

  • First headline is from BBC News.

  • Is red meat back on the menu?

  • So back on the menu.

  • Meaning available again?

  • Yes.

  • So we have a forward expression back B A, C k on O n the T A G and menu M e.

  • And you now near What's your favorite food when you go out to eat?

  • What do you like to eat?

  • Well, I do.

  • I do like curry, and I do.

  • I do like this is particular lamb Rogan Josh at my favorite curry.

  • Your favorite curry has Lambro grand.

  • Josh, how often do you order that?

  • Uh, every time I go, there s Oh, it's on the menu every time you go with them until we say it's available.

  • It's on the menu.

  • Have you ever been there?

  • And it wasn't available?

  • Don't remind me.

  • I did.

  • I did go that once.

  • I told lots of people about this particular dish and how delicious it waas on.

  • It was off the menu off the menu.

  • Not available.

  • How awful.

  • How did that make you feel?

  • Terrible?

  • Terrible.

  • But I did the next time I went back there.

  • Fortunately, it was back on the menu, back on the menu celebrations in the Angela household?

  • Absolutely, Rogan Josh was back on the menu.

  • William.

  • So in a restaurant sense, if food is available in the restaurant, it is on the menu.

  • If it's not available, it's off the menu.

  • If it's available again, it's back on the menu.

  • We don't only use this expression for food.

  • We can talk about it.

  • We can use it to talk about the availability of pretty much anything.

  • For example, if we stopped news review if we took news of you off the menu, yeah, I took it off the menu.

  • We took it off the air.

  • We stopped making it news of you would be off the menu on Dhe.

  • Then if everybody panics and window bring it back, we would put news of you back on the menu.

  • Okay, so it's not gonna happen, though.

  • It's so it can be used figuratively.

  • Absolutely yes, in this headline.

  • It's being used in connection with food, but it is figurative.

  • So how do we explain that?

  • Well, it's what headline writers like to do.

  • This is a story about food.

  • It's a story about red meat being something we shouldn't eat.

  • And now maybe something we should eat.

  • So they're asking the question.

  • Is red meat back on the menu?

  • It means, Is it available for us to eat safely again?

  • Okay, thank you.

  • And now it's our second headline, please.

  • Yes, we are going to CBS Miami New Red meat guidelines.

  • Raising eyebrows, raising eyebrows, causing surprise or disbelief.

  • Yes.

  • So imagine, Actually, so raising eyebrows means that something is shocking.

  • It's surprising.

  • And you actually do a facial expression?

  • Yeah.

  • Okay.

  • So the other day, guess what Rob told May.

  • I don't know what he told me that he'd given up eating biscuits.

  • What now?

  • Rope has given up eating biscuits.

  • So if you look at Katherine's face now, if you, uh, that's right, you can see that her eyebrows, those lines of hair that go above her eyes have gone up.

  • Show us again.

  • What?

  • Yes.

  • And so if somebody tells you something surprising or something that you can't believe the eyebrows go up exactly that Yes, you raise your eyebrows.

  • It's a normal facial reaction to surprise or shock.

  • You raise your eyebrows.

  • Some people like way talk about raising eyebrows, meaning being surprised even if you don't actually do it physically.

  • Something raises eyebrows.

  • It's surprising.

  • It's shocking.

  • It's unusual.

  • We can also use in the singular.

  • You can say he raised an eyebrow.

  • Yeah, and it means equally.

  • He was shocked, Surprised or questioning it doesn't mean that he was half surprised.

  • No, no, no.

  • It's just a way of variety variation on the expression.

  • Okay, if you would like to see Maur programs that we make about food and controversial food, we have a great six minute English about coffee, which you can find where Katherine you can find that by looking on our YouTube channel.

  • Just click the link there and we'll take you straight to it.

  • And now it's time for our final headline.

  • Please.

  • Already we are now going to science New science daily.

  • You don't have to go cold turkey on red meat to see health benefits.

  • Go cold turkey.

  • Give up a bad habit immediately and completely.

  • Yes, so go cold turkey.

  • Three word expression G o second word cold.

  • C o L d Third word turkey T u r k e y.

  • Now, if you go cold turkey, you give up a bad habit totally and completely.

  • Now, we often use this to talk about things that are that you can become dependent on.

  • We use them about drugs.

  • We use it about things like caffeine.

  • I believe you gave up coffee and recently Neil, didn't you?

  • Yeah.

  • About two months ago, I completely quit all caffeine.

  • So no coffee, No tea?

  • Coffee?

  • No Coke cola, no chocolate?

  • No nothing.

  • Nothing.

  • So your caffeine intake was quite high.

  • Yeah, I suppose so.

  • Fuckups here and there.

  • Gabarra Chocolates?

  • Yeah, that's right.

  • And then you stopped completely completely company immediately.

  • Wow.

  • No, no, no.

  • Sneaky coffee.

  • Nothing.

  • How did that make you feel?

  • Absolutely terrible.

  • Had today I couldn't sleep sweating, shivering.

  • How long did that take to go?

  • A few days and then after that.

  • Fine, fine.

  • So that period of feeling ill and horrible is the effect of going cold turkey.

  • Now we use this in some drug addiction you actually get.

  • If you If you cut out certain drugs completely, you'll get a skin bumpy skin, which looks like a turkey when it's ready to cook.

  • I believe so.

  • I'm going cold.

  • Turkey means stopping something that you're quite obsessed with are addicted to.

  • Doesn't have to be drugs or coffee, and it can be stopping anything.

  • We use it in a wider sense.

  • You like soap operas don't need.

  • I love a soap opera.

  • Curry curry.

  • Coronation Street.

  • Yes, long running British.

  • So wonderful.

  • In my opinion, it's lovely that you were watching.

  • What was it 5 10 episode today?

  • E don't think it was quite that, but But I did go cold turkey.

  • I stopped completely.

  • I didn't shake and shiver.

  • I missed it a bit, but I decided I'm spending too much time watching so proper I'm gonna stop.

  • I'm going to do more exciting things with my life, and I didn't even watch five minutes stop completely.

  • I went cold turkey.

  • Brilliant.

  • Well done.

  • Now it's time for a recap off our vocabulary already.

  • So we hard back on the menu available again, raising eyebrows, causing