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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • I'm Dan and joining me today is Catherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Dan.

  • And hello, everybody.

  • What a fantastic jumper.

  • Thank you.

  • Very colorful.

  • Very nice, right?

  • What's the story?

  • We're looking at data privacy today.

  • Something really important for all of us these days.

  • Okay, Lets him or from this BBC World Service news report Australia's consumer watchdog has filed a lawsuit against the tech company Google accusing it of misleading customers about its collection and use of personal data.

  • The commission said that Google collected and used the personal information of android phone and tablet users without giving them a proper choice.

  • So Google is being taken to court by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

  • That's a C C C.

  • Now they're saying that Google collected and used personal data of Android users without fully asking their permission.

  • Now the A.

  • C.

  • C says that consumers were informed about switching off location history, but there was another area collecting location data that users weren't informed about?

  • Well, we've got three words and expressions that people can use to talk about this story.

  • What do we have for them?

  • Yes, we have misleading trucking on dhe custodian.

  • Misleading tracking and custodian.

  • Okay, let's have our first headline then, please.

  • Let's go.

  • We have the Guardian.

  • Google sued by a C C C after allegedly misleading customers over location, data collection, misleading, making someone believes something untrue or incorrect.

  • Now I see some word building on the horizon.

  • There is This is a lovely built word with several parts to it.

  • I'll spell the whole thing first.

  • M I s l e a D i N g misleading.

  • So let's start with the middle part.

  • Lead the verb to lead.

  • Now, if you lead somebody's somewhere or you lied somebody to do something, You behave in a way which makes them literally walk in a certain direction.

  • You direct them one waiter.

  • Yes.

  • So if you're you're in a new building and you're looking for the loo, you say to somebody, Can you show me where the bathroom is?

  • If they say follow, may they lead you to the bathroom so you can physically lead somebody by taking them to a particular place, or you can a second way we use the word lead.

  • To lead somebody means to make them believe something.

  • So you can lead somebody to believe that something is true.

  • Yeah, it's like reaching a conclusion when you I don't know.

  • Let's see.

  • You see a page full of mathematical figures and you say it leads me to believe, and then you reach a complete exactly a conclusion based on evidence the evidence is presented leads you to a belief or a conclusion.

  • So what about the miss part?

  • Well, as we know the miss at the beginning, M i s We use miss often to me not or wrongly or badly.

  • So you got words like misunderstanding.

  • You've got miss here, miss.

  • Here?

  • Yes.

  • You smoke exactly all these words.

  • That means that you did something wrong or badly.

  • So if you miss, lead somebody, you make them believe something that isn't true.

  • Yeah, like I did a station.

  • Oh, I don't know.

  • Some time ago, somebody came up and asked me for directions and I got confused and I told him to go the complete wrong way.

  • No, I mislaid them but it wasn't on purpose.

  • How did you feel left of it?

  • Well, when I realized what I done Oh, no.

  • And put my hands on my head.

  • But they'd be Oh, so you misled them by accident.

  • That's right.

  • You can mislead people to believe things.

  • That is a complete accident.

  • You don't mean to do it, or you can mislead somebody deliberately on purpose on.

  • We often use mislead in this context to say that you somebody was misled.

  • That's a passive, isn't it?

  • We do use and mislead in the passive quite a lot on the A, C.

  • C.

  • C.

  • Are saying that Google misled customers deliberately as saying it is an intentional, misleading action.

  • And do we have any propositions or connecting words?

  • How do we use be mislead in a sentence?

  • You can mislead somebody about something so Google misled uses about their data.

  • Exactly.

  • That's what they're saying.

  • Or you can mislead somebody into doing something like you misled this poor tourists.

  • Poor person.

  • It's going the wrong, completely wrong direction and probably ruined their day in the pit in the process.

  • If you're out there and you're watching, I am sincerely sorry I didn't mean to do it.

  • I was trying to be helpful.

  • Please forgive me.

  • Well, thank you very much for not misleading us about this information on.

  • Let's go to our second headline.

  • Okay, so we're looking at the age now on a C C.

  • C's road.

  • Sims is trucking Google tracking us on the world's watching, tracking, following and observing the status of something.

  • Now, I thought that this was something to do with hunting.

  • Well, trucking T r a c k i N g.

  • If we look at the verb that that makes up this now on track, if you truck something, you follow it.

  • Not because you can see it, but you.

  • There is evidence of where it has bean.

  • So a tracker dog can find a person just by smelling.

  • It can follow the smell.

  • Somebody who contract things often goes into.

  • We think of them as being in the out in the wild natural jungle or a desert or something.

  • And the person looks for signs, maybe footprints, maybe broken branches, some sort of disturbance.

  • So you can see where that person waas and you follow them.

  • You truck them by the signs of where they have bean.

  • So does this mean that Rod Sims is following Google in the forest?

  • No doubt, it doesn't mean that, but it does mean that Rod Sims is looking for evidence of what Google's actions have.

  • Bean is watching them.

  • He's taking data had I don't know how he's doing it exactly, but he is looking at the evidence to find out what their activities have been and still are so monitoring them.

  • Then monitoring is a really good synonym for trucking.

  • Yes, OK, so what kind of things can we track apart from Google?

  • Well, we can track lots of different things in lots of different senses.

  • So in a business sense, we often have charts and graphs that truck the progress of stocks and shares investments.

  • You look for that line going up.

  • Hopefully, if it goes up, it's It's your tracking the progress of your shares, which is good if the lines going down.

  • Not so not so good.

  • Yeah, you can truck student's progress in education.

  • You can get a report that says this is how the scores went this year.

  • For this term, you can truck the progress of people in a scientific study.

  • There's lots of ways it means to follow progress by looking at the evidence, and I'm recording it.

  • We will be tracking the viewers of this program after way.

  • Well, yes, we'll go on to all hours trucking platforms, and we'll look at this data of how many people click Blake.

  • And did you share it?

  • And did you do comments?

  • So please do it because we're gonna be tracking.

  • I want to say that nice, like Go and open a pinup, Thank you very much and thank you for keeping us on track with that information.

  • Now let's go to our third and final headline.

  • But before we do, if you enjoy listening to news stories about tech companies or data privacy issues, then we have an old news review just for you, don't we, Katherine?

  • We do.

  • And the headline for this one is Uppal to hinder Facebook web, trucking it from last year's cool vocabulary.

  • And it's another trucking story, so just click the link and you'll go straight to it.

  • Thank you very much.

  • This is news review from BBC Learning English.

  • Now let's go to our third and final headline.

  • Yes, so finally, the Australian.

  • Hey, CCC case shows why Google is not a trustworthy custodian of our data.

  • Now that's an opinion piece from the Australian custodian protector and care of something.

  • Yes, yes, I was just gonna say It's a lovely Well, it's one of my favorite words.

  • It's a great word is a brilliant word.

  • So let's do the spelling.

  • C U S t o D I A n custodian comes from the known custody.

  • That's the yellow source.

  • What we put on cake, right custard.

  • That would be lovely.

  • The yellow sweet source you have.

  • Imagine there was a man in charge of the custard custard.

  • Wonderful custodian of custody.

  • No, it's not that, unfortunately similar sounding completely different if you have custody off something and we have those other words that you use have custody off something you it is with you and you protect it.

  • You look after it, you keep it safe and you have illegal on moral responsibility for that thing.

  • Now we often use this for Children in Children who have paret who aren't with their parents or copy with both parents, and separation or divorce can be various reasons.

  • And the child a court will award custody off that child to a particular person, or sometimes you can share custody.

  • And that means that that person named by the court is responsible for the welfare, This safety where that child lives, everything that is custody means responsibility for something's safety.

  • So the person who has custody is the custodian.

  • I see.

  • Okay, so the custodian takes care of things.

  • I mean people, obviously in this case, a child.

  • But what other things can we talk about?

  • In terms of custodians?

  • There are so many things that you can be a custodian off, and sometimes a custodian is a person.

  • Sometimes it can be an organization, so you can have things like the National Trust in the UK is a custodian.

  • Off castles, museums, big old houses, states They've got some very nice property.

  • They've got some fabulous properties.

  • Yes, so you can be a custodian off a place.

  • You can be a custodian off things like investments like art collections like natural places.

  • You could be a custodian off ideas, morals, principles.

  • We could think of the police or some religion's being custodians of certain ideas and values.

  • Now can we recap the vocabulary please, we can.

  • We had misleading making someone believes something untrue or incorrect.

  • We had trucking, following and observing the status of something.

  • And we had custodian protector on dhe carer off something.

  • Thanks very much.