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  • Welcome to TPMvids Disney Beat where we talk about all things Disney. If this is your first

  • time watching the channel, hit that subscribe and click the bell icon to be notified when

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  • One thing that’s always set Disney apart from other theme parks has been its use of

  • audio animatronics. It’s that extra bit of Disney magic that really brings your theme

  • park experience to the next level. Audio Animatronics have been used by the Walt Disney Company

  • since 1961 and to this day are seen all over the Disney parks. Since about 2005, the Disney

  • Parks have been looking for ways to enhance the guest experience through animatronics.

  • So in the mid 2000s, they started something called the Disney Living Character initiative.

  • This initiative by Disney was to bring new levels of guest interactions while bringing

  • characters to life like never before. One early initiative was the introduction of the

  • articulated characters. A lot of the impressive animatronic attractions created by Walt Disney

  • Imagineering, wether for the Living Character Initiative or not, have quietly disappeared

  • from the Disney parks and no longer exist. So today, were gonna be taking a look at

  • the Top 5 Extinct Disney Animatronic Attractions.

  • Number 5 Lucky the Dinosaur

  • 2003 marked the year that Disney debuted it’s very first free-roving audio animatronic;

  • Lucky the Dinosaur. Standing at 8 feet tall, this Segnosaurus animatronic character was

  • very life like and was the first official character built in response to Disney’s

  • Living Character Initiative. He could walk on his own, move his head, blink his eyes,

  • respond to guests and even signed autographs. He made his first appearance at The Natural

  • History Museum of Los Angeles on August 28th, 2003. A few days later, he made his way over

  • to Disney California Adventure, but since he was still in the prototype testing phase,

  • he returned to Walt Disney Imagineering and didn’t make his official Disney Park debut

  • until 2005.

  • You know what, weve been trying all kinds of things

  • In June 2005, Lucky appeared at Walt Disney World in Dinoland USA at Animal Kingdom along

  • with his handler Dr. Woodson.

  • Lucky this is Cole. (Growl)

  • He said he’s very pleased to meet you Cole. (Growls) Thats good.

  • Now you might be wondering why he was pushing a flower cart? Well I guess you could say

  • the flower cart was pushing him. See the figure needed to be lightweight so he could walk,

  • but he also needed power to run, so the flower cart was used to conceal the batteries and

  • computers that provided power to Lucky the Dinosaur. After his brief summer stint at

  • Animal Kingdom he was then moved to celebrate the opening of Hong Kong Disneyland in Sept

  • of 2005. Now since he was only a prototype, he wasn’t very reliable. It was said that

  • during his time in the parks, he was constantly missing multiple appearances each day because

  • he kept breaking down. So Lucky the dinosaur goes down in history and joins the other dinosaurs

  • that are now extinct, but has made a few other appearances outside of the Disney parks. He

  • has a new permanent home at Walt Disney Imagineering in Glendale California.

  • I think we got rid of him. Yea we did, thats okay.

  • Number 4 Chef Remy

  • Bonjour!

  • In 2008, also as a part of Disney’s Living Character initiative,

  • Bravo!

  • Bon Appétit from Chef Remypremiered as an addition to the dining experience at

  • Restaurant des Stars in the Walt Disney Studios Park at The Disneyland Paris Resort. Later

  • in 2009, it would also make its premiere at Les Chefs de France restaurant in the France

  • Pavilion at Epcot.

  • Six days a week with four appearances a day, a Maître d’ would greet diners of the restaurant

  • with a rolling gourmet food cart. They’d lift the lid, like they normally do in France,

  • from a silver-domed cheese platter, when the Maître d’reveals a six-inch-tall animatronic

  • rat. Chef Remy from the animated film Ratatouille then comes to life, entertaining diners with

  • animated movements and quiet little squeaks.

  • Those aren’t your chicken strips. Those are for her.

  • Probably the only rat you’d be okay with seeing in a restaurant.

  • To date, Chef Remy is the smallest audio animatronic created by Walt Disney Imagineering and is

  • also the only living character initiative animatronic to get two separate figures made.

  • It does a very good job at entertaining diners and bringing this small little animated character

  • to life. Now you might be wondering exactly how this figure works. Well, if you look closely

  • at this video, you can see that the black handle of the silver dome has a small joystick

  • on top of it and what looks to be a trigger at the bottom. It’s likely that this gives

  • the Maître d’ control of the figure. Even while this cast member sings, pay attention

  • to her hand gripping the handle in relation to Remy’s movement.

  • (Sings) Even though he made it for you. Oh that was wonderful!

  • The animatronic figure was definitely a success and lasted at Epcot for 4 years until it became

  • extinct in October 2013 and for 5 years until June 2014 at Disneyland Paris. With the addition

  • of the new Ratatouille ride coming to the France Pavilion at Epcot, it would be a great

  • opportunity to bring this animatronic back to Epcot at some point in the future, wouldn't

  • you say so?

  • Au Revoir! Au Revoir! Say Bey

  • Number 3 Push the Talking Trashcan

  • This is my home, Tomorrowland!

  • Although not part of the Disney living character initiative, Push the Taking Trashcan made

  • its official debut in 1995 at the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World. Created and Designed

  • by Daniel Deutsch, Push was a radio controlled robot that made daily appearances in Tomorrowland.

  • Now he was an actual trashcan: if you pushed the flap you could look inside to see a trash

  • bag, but he also moved around freely and interacted with guests. He was actually quite the character.

  • Its okay people she’s not stealing me.

  • When interacting with PUSH, it was easy to forget that it’s being operated by someone,

  • and the technology of this figure is actually quite simple. So the robot was controlled

  • by two cast members on stage with PUSH who appeared in disguise, and by disguise we mean

  • wearing normal clothes to blend in as a guest. One cast member had a transmitter hidden in

  • a backpack and the other had a microphone hidden in their hand.

  • My name is push.

  • When they spoke into the microphone it changed their voice and allowed them to interact with

  • guests nearby.

  • Thank you PUSH. Alright see ya!

  • PUSH became a staple of Tomorrowland at Magic Kingdom and was loved by fans. So much so

  • that when Disney announced they would be saying goodbye to Push, fans reacted on social media

  • with Facebook Groups and hastags trying to keep this character in the park. According

  • to Daniel Doich in a New York Daily News Article, there wassome ambiguity to the verbiage

  • as to what they owned and what I ownedthat being between Disney and Real Simple

  • Ideas, the company that owned PUSH.

  • When push comes to shove, ultimately he was canned from the Magic Kingdom making him extinct,

  • but his cousins who sport a slightly different look can be seen at other Disney Parks overseas

  • in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Paris.

  • Number 2 The Luxo Jr. Dancing lamp

  • The Pixar Place area at Disney’s Hollywood Studios opened in 2008. Later in June of 2009

  • Disney premiered its newest animatronic in the area which was a 6 foot tall Pixar Luxo

  • Jr. animatronic lamp. You were able to see this animatronic up close on the wall across

  • from Toy Story Midway Mania, approximately every 15 mins for a mini show.

  • Luxo was a very impressive figure but it did face many mechanical issues that caused it

  • to constantly go down. Now most Disney audio animatronics run on hydraulics but Luxo Jr

  • was a prototype that used electrical actuators.

  • Around the time Luxo Jr appeared at the park in 2009, the Norwegian company Luxo lamps

  • filed a lawsuit against Pixar and Disney accusing the companies of infringing its copyright

  • when they sold a limited edition Luxo Jr. figure that came with the Up Bluray. The lawsuit

  • document also mentioned the Luxo Jr animatronic figure at Walt Disney World. Luxo Jr was removed

  • from the park in April of 2010 with Disney saying that it will no longer perform since

  • it was a test figure with a limited run. Seeing where this figure was built and placed, doesn’t

  • seem like a location for a limited run type figure so its removal was probably more of

  • a case of mechanical and legal issues, but well never know for sure. Also, the alley

  • of Pixar Place where Luxo Jr once performed is going to become a backstage area once Toy

  • Story Land at Disney’s Hollywood Studios opens, so it probably would have been lights

  • out anyway even if he was still around. Number 1

  • Wall-E If you were lucky enough to be in the right

  • place in 2008 you would have experienced a very impressive Wall-E animatronic. Based

  • on the title character of the 2008 Disney Pixar film, Wall-E was created by Walt Disney

  • Imagineering and was used for promotional events for the film’s release, with the

  • plan to eventually transfer to Walt Disney World and Disneyland. Like the other figures

  • created for the living character initiative, Wall-E is fully interactive and can roll on

  • his tread feet, tilt his head, move his arms and hands, all while responding to guests

  • through electronic sounds made vaguely to resemble speech. It really brought the character

  • from the animated film to life.

  • The Magic of Disney Animation meet and greet at Hollywood studios and an area at Disney

  • California Adventure were actually set up to house the planned Wall-E experience in

  • the summer of 2008, but it was never carried out. Aside from a cardboard cut out that was

  • used a place holder for the Wall-E figure, it was an extinct animatronic in the parks

  • right from the start.

  • So the figure stands about 3 1/2 to 4 feet tall and its said to weight approximately

  • 700 pounds. Word on the street is that Disney was concerned about the figure’s weight

  • and size and became worried that it could easily run over guests feet, causing harm.

  • So yea, the animatronic never made it into the Park but it has made brief appearances

  • at the D23 Epxo in the past. There’s also accounts saying that the Wall-E animatronic

  • figure was actually testing backstage at Walt Disney World in 2008 but kept breaking down.

  • Probably a similar situation of when Wall-E died during a meet and greet at D23. So along

  • with the character’s size, the unreliably was probably another major factor of why it

  • was never seen in the park .

  • So, have you ever had a chance to experience any of these figures first hand? And if you

  • could choose one figure to be brought back to the parks, which would it be? Leave a comment

  • bellow and start a conversation.

  • If you have any videos from the Disney Parks that you want to share with us to be used

  • in future videos, follow the link in the description below.

  • Thanks so much for watching! Click the TPM icon on the screen to subscribe to this channel,

  • and check out some of these other videos which were sure youll like!

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Archival- Top 5 Extinct Disney Animatronic Attractions

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/20
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