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  • 00:00:03,690 --> 00:00:06,410 YACINE REZGUI: Next billion users, or NBU,

  • are countries where half of the population or more

  • is not connected yet to the internet.

  • They have a different way to interact

  • with the internet, a different way to use their smartphone.

  • And we're going to highlight you all those cases

  • in this presentation.

  • First, let's have a situation on the ground.

  • 00:00:28,980 --> 00:00:31,870 As you can see, the next billion users

  • are spread out, three different continents--

  • Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

  • For some of them, internet is just

  • the beginning of a new era.

  • 00:00:49,880 --> 00:00:52,730 We usually think about the next billion users as something

  • in the future, something which is not ready yet.

  • As shown on the map, numerous countries

  • already part of the internet.

  • Some countries in Asia as a whole region account

  • for 50% of the smartphone market--

  • Vietnam, Philippines, Indonesia, they

  • are part of the Southeast Asia, which

  • accounts for 350 million users on the internet.

  • And India itself accounts for 40 million new users every year.

  • Again, we usually think as the next billion users

  • that we have a timeline, we have a time to think about it.

  • It's already big.

  • It's already present, and just continue

  • to be bigger and bigger in the upcoming years.

  • 00:01:45,720 --> 00:01:48,270 For them, phone is not only a device

  • to connect to the internet, it's the only device

  • they will have access to you.

  • So you should not expect your users

  • to have access to a computer or tablet

  • to access your applications.

  • 00:02:02,760 --> 00:02:04,880 They have a mobile-only mindset.

  • And, as an example, Nigeria has only 11%

  • of the population having access to a computer.

  • They have an instinct for ubiquitous computing.

  • In India, 30% of the search made on Google are using voice.

  • It's not a net case, it's not a power user thing to do there.

  • It's really normal.

  • They have natural interaction with the smartphone.

  • They will use it in all the possible ways.

  • Lastly, they have a huge demand for localized content.

  • English is the first language on the internet,

  • but it doesn't mean it's a language understood

  • by all the users over there.

  • They don't only want translated content.

  • They want content adapted for them-- for their culture,

  • their environment.

  • 00:02:56,320 --> 00:02:59,739 Also, you should expect users to change their language quite

  • often based on the environment--

  • Maybe at work with family, with friends,

  • based on that current location.

  • They will just continuously change language.

  • It's not something rare for them.

  • It's really often.

  • 00:03:17,280 --> 00:03:21,540 As shown on the map, numerous countries who are NBU

  • are part of Asia and Africa.

  • Both continents accounts for 119 official languages.

  • In India, you have 314 million people

  • who can speak two languages and sometimes even more.

  • Again, in India, you had 23 official languages written

  • in 13 different scripts.

  • It brings some challenges in terms of content display

  • and font-swapping.

  • 00:03:55,550 --> 00:03:59,330 Hindi, which is one of the official languages in India,

  • is not even on the top 30 languages in the web,

  • even though it's the fourth most spoken language

  • around the world.

  • Nigeria itself as a country has 500 spoken languages

  • around the whole country.

  • Even though English may be the official language there,

  • people will use their local language because, again, it's

  • part of their culture.

  • You cannot deny that.

  • 00:04:27,840 --> 00:04:32,489 Also, they have another diversity in terms of hardware.

  • They will have different devices, different brands.

  • And you have to account for them whenever you are

  • developing your application.

  • 00:04:43,240 --> 00:04:46,300 Some of them you may already know, some OEMs.

  • Obviously Samsung is there.

  • But also some Chinese OEMs, as Huawei,

  • Oppo, OnePlus, and Xiaomi.

  • In Nigeria, you have also Everyone.

  • And in India, you have MicroMax.

  • Transsion is the first Android Go OEM around the world.

  • And maybe you've never heard of it.

  • They have commonly lower specs devices,

  • but you should not target only those.

  • You should think about it as a spectrum.

  • Some people may have higher spec devices, some of them lower,

  • and you have to account for all of them.

  • 00:05:24,270 --> 00:05:27,440 Lastly, they have long wear hardware upgrade.

  • You should think about it whenever

  • you estimate your operational costs developing an application

  • targeting those markets.

  • 00:05:39,050 --> 00:05:42,650 We usually think about offline as a narrow state.

  • You're in a plane, in a train, in a building where

  • the signal is not strong.

  • Well actually, it can be a choice for them.

  • Offline usually is just a temporary mistake,

  • the way we think about it in Western countries.

  • But in those NBU countries, 95% of the users

  • are on prepaid plans.

  • Even though 4G and 3G is definitely

  • cheaper years after years, people just turn it off

  • whenever they don't need it.

  • So whenever you're showing a banner, you're not connected,

  • well, they're already aware of it.

  • They are the one who set it off.

  • 00:06:24,770 --> 00:06:27,770 Also, Wi-Fi is not always reliable.

  • So you can't expect people to download resources

  • over Wi-Fi because they may not have it at home.

  • Sometimes 4G is even faster than Wi-Fi.

  • 00:06:39,550 --> 00:06:42,010 Some websites may be also offered

  • for free, on mobile plans, or restricted

  • by government regulation.

  • So whenever you're integrating with third parties,

  • think about it whenever you're developing your apps

  • targeting those markets.

  • 00:06:58,230 --> 00:07:02,220 We usually think about diversity as a problem,

  • as just too many parameters to account for.

  • We would love just to have one single standard

  • but that's just denying their diversity.

  • We think diversity at Google is not a problem, it's an asset.

  • It's a growth opportunity for your markets.

  • 00:07:25,300 --> 00:07:30,500 As shown earlier, again, many countries which are NBUs

  • are part of Asia, which already accounts

  • for 50% of the smartphone market and will

  • account for 50% of the upcoming growth

  • on the smartphone market.

  • You have to compare that to mature markets

  • like Western countries where you have

  • already a huge penetration of internet and smartphone access.

  • 00:07:51,150 --> 00:07:55,380 Over the next 1.6 billion new connections,

  • 40% will come from these top five countries.

  • Four of them are next billion users--

  • Nigeria, India, Pakistan, and Indonesia.

  • Also, the surrounding countries will

  • be affected by that growth.

  • So again, think about it, the next billion users are already

  • there.

  • And they're just waiting for your apps

  • to be compatible with them.

  • Now I'm going to hand over to my colleague, Rajeev--

  • Amrit, my bad-- is going to talk about improving

  • your application by adopting Google products that

  • can help you to do that.

  • To you, Amrit.

  • AMRIT SANJEEV: Thanks, Yacine.

  • 00:08:42,110 --> 00:08:43,280 Hi, everyone.

  • My name is Amrit Sanjeev.

  • I'm a developer advocate at Google based in India.

  • And, in this section, I want to talk about some

  • of the Google products that you can use in order

  • to help give a better user experience for your users

  • in the NBU market.

  • Let's start with app bundles.

  • App size is a key factor that users

  • consider when they install an app in these markets.

  • By switching an upload format to app bundles,

  • you allow player to distribute an APK that's

  • optimized in terms of resources, code, and languages

  • based on your device's configuration.

  • This helps greatly reduce the initial install size

  • of the application and also the install friction

  • that users have.

  • I want to call out an example here--

  • RedBus, which is a ticket-booking app from India

  • who switched over to app bundle format

  • and reduced their APK size by 30%.

  • This, in turn, helped them increase their conversions

  • by 6%.

  • And the best part of it is that they

  • didn't have to change a single line of code

  • to achieve this result.

  • To optimize even further, you can

  • choose to deliver functionality as on-demand

  • rather than package it all together

  • in the initial install.

  • This can be achieved by using the on-demand feature

  • with app bundles.

  • By adopting on-demand features, you

  • not only reduce the initial install size,

  • but also the space that you actually take on the device.

  • A lot of users run out of space on devices in these regions

  • regularly.

  • The other important factor is that based on usage,

  • you can choose to remove modules and save space for the user.

  • An example I want to call out is PayTM,

  • who initially reduced their app size using app bundles

  • and then further optimized by removing some of their modules

  • as on-demand modules, and reduced the app

  • size by a further 20%.

  • 00:10:49,720 --> 00:10:50,960 And they're not done yet.

  • They're making further changes and improving on this number

  • even further.

  • To extend this even further, you could use conditional modules

  • to install certain modules based on your device

  • configuration or user's locale during the initial install.

  • Let me explain this with an example for you guys.

  • Assume that you have an app which you want to release it

  • to two different countries.

  • But in each of these countries, you

  • have completely different payment instruments

  • of support, which would mean that you would have

  • completely different workflows, assets, and libraries required

  • for realizing each of the payment workflows.

  • One way of doing this would be to package all of this

  • into a single payment module and, at runtime,

  • decide which workflow to show to the user

  • depending on which locale he is using the app from.

  • With conditional modules, you could actually

  • separate this into two different modules and during install time

  • decide which module needs to be packaged with the app based

  • on the user's locale.

  • That way your device would only get

  • the portions of code and the workflow that it will ever use.

  • The second payment module will not be there at all.

  • 00:12:12,390 --> 00:12:15,260 As Yacine mentioned, BOU countries

  • have a lot of official languages.

  • For example India, has 23 official languages.

  • But the interesting thing here to note

  • is that users usually set their device language to be English.

  • And it's a very common practice for applications

  • which cater for these markets to have an in-app setting where

  • users choose the language for localizing content

  • on their app.

  • Now, when you take app bundles for instance,

  • app bundles use the device language

  • to optimize what language resources need

  • to be packaged along with the APK during the installation.

  • And with language splits API, you actually

  • bring the best of both worlds.

  • Using this API, the developed can then

  • fetch additional language resources

  • for different languages, say, when

  • the user is selecting a new language from the settings.

  • 00:13:09,820 --> 00:13:12,140 I talked about install size for some time.

  • Let's talk about how app upgrades happen in this region.

  • App upgrade cycles are usually longer,

  • which means you will end up having situations where you

  • will have more versions of your app in the real world

  • to support.

  • This has side effects.

  • It not only increases your operational cost,

  • but you have to deal with situations where

  • users negatively rate your app for bugs

  • you have already fixed.

  • But they are still experiencing it

  • because they never upgraded it.

  • Now, in in-app upgrade API helps you fix some of these problems.

  • It allows you to show a dialog to the user informing them

  • that a new update is available.

  • The best part of this API that it actually