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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Hi, I'm Carl Azuz for CNN 10.

  • In just two days, the United Kingdom is scheduled

  • to leave the European Union.

  • No country has done that since the EU was formed in 1993.

  • Britain's exit, the Brexit, would

  • leave 27 countries in the economic

  • and political co-operative.

  • But it doesn't look like it's going to happen by Friday.

  • Britain's parliament has rejected the terms

  • of the agreement between its government and the European

  • Union, and a Brexit without an agreement,

  • also called a No-Deal Brexit, or a crashing out by Britain,

  • has a lot of opponents because it would come with uncertainty

  • about issues like trade, immigration, borders, laws,

  • and it could lead to a temporary downturn

  • in the British economy.

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May

  • has requested that the EU extend the Brexit deadline again.

  • It did that once earlier this year.

  • And the new Brexit deadline would be on June 30.

  • But will European Union leaders agree to it?

  • European Council President Donald Tusk,

  • who heads up the political wing of the EU,

  • has suggested offering Britain a flexible extension

  • of the Brexit deadline that could last as long as a year.

  • President Tusk says he wants to avoid

  • an ongoing series of shorter deadlines

  • and emergency meetings.

  • The EU is holding a summit on Wednesday

  • to discuss these proposals and figure out a way forward.

  • Meantime, Britain's leader continues

  • to battle an ongoing series of challenges.

  • THERESA MAY: We have a deal which

  • cancels our EU membership fee, which

  • stops the EU making our laws.

  • - Theresa May's days as Prime Minister are numbered.

  • May has said she will step down once Brexit is delivered.

  • She's in charge of the UK at one of the most turbulent times

  • in recent political history.

  • In 2016, Theresa May won a leadership contest

  • to become Britain's second female prime minister

  • after David Cameron resigned following

  • the shock vote for Brexit, Britain unexpectedly

  • voting to leave the EU.

  • As a long serving MP and home secretary,

  • Theresa May had built a reputation

  • for getting things done.

  • In her first speech as prime minister,

  • May pledged to support the families who

  • were just managing to survive financially

  • and to fight social injustice.

  • THERESA MAY: The government I lead

  • will be driven not by the interests of the

  • privileged few, but by yours.

  • - This platform and her pragmatism

  • proved popular in her first year.

  • To capitalize on a double digit poll

  • lead against the left-wing opposition party,

  • Theresa May performed a political U-turn.

  • After having ruled out an election several times,

  • May called a snap general election for June 8, 2017.

  • THERESA MAY: So we need a general election,

  • and we need one now.

  • - It backfired.

  • May was criticized for her manifesto and stiffness

  • in the face of media questioning during the campaign

  • and dubbed, the Maybot.

  • Her Conservative party lost their majority

  • and had to enter into a confidence and supply

  • deal with the Democratic Unionist Party

  • to form the government.

  • THERESA MAY: --in the Democratic Unionist Party in particular.

  • - Since the election, May has cut an isolated figure.

  • She survived a Tory leadership challenge in December 2018,

  • though key members of her cabinet have resigned.

  • Brexit defines her premiership.

  • There has been no consensus in the British Parliament

  • over leaving the EU.

  • Brexiteer advocate a clean break, others for a soft Brexit

  • or a second referendum on EU membership.

  • - We are building an economy--

  • - In November 2018, Theresa May and negotiators in Brussels

  • settled on a draft deal for the UK to leave the EU.

  • British MPs on both sides quickly attacked it.

  • Some said it went too far, others

  • said it didn't go far enough.

  • Still, May is committed to passing her Brexit deal

  • through Parliament to avoid the UK crashing out of the EU

  • without a deal.

  • Brexit is one of the most challenging projects

  • ever undertaken by Parliament.

  • The fact that May campaigned to remain in the EU

  • in the referendum and leads a fractured minority government

  • makes the job even harder.

  • CARL AZUZ: 10 second trivia--

  • under which US president was a trade embargo first imposed

  • between America and Cuba?

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B.

  • Johnson, or Richard M. Nixon?

  • Though President John F. Kennedy expanded the embargo,

  • it was President Dwight D. Eisenhower

  • who first imposed it.

  • It's still in place today.

  • The embargo includes penalties on Cuba's economy

  • and it restricts the travel and business that Americans

  • are allowed to do in Cuba.

  • There were exceptions to the rule.

  • One of them, a deal made in December,

  • allowed Cuban citizens to play in baseball's major leagues.

  • Previously, in order for them to do that,

  • they'd had to defect to give up their Cuban citizenship

  • and they might not have been allowed

  • back into Cuba afterward.

  • Under this agreement, US baseball teams

  • would pay about 25% of the Cuban player's signing bonus

  • to the Cuban Baseball Federation.

  • The Trump administration had indicated it was reviewing

  • the deal when it was made and on Monday,

  • the US government canceled it.

  • It says the Cuban Baseball Federation is part

  • of Cuba's communist government.

  • And because trade with Cuba is banned under the embargo,

  • the baseball deal couldn't stand.

  • The administration says it won't allow

  • part of the Cuban government to take

  • part of the athlete's wages.

  • The Cuban Baseball Federation called the deal's cancellation

  • politically motivated and said the deal

  • made for a safer way for Cubans to play in the major leagues.

  • Some have paid to be smuggled to other countries

  • first to get around the US embargo.

  • Major League Baseball says it still

  • supports the original goal of the agreement, which

  • was to stop the human trafficking of baseball players

  • from Cuba.

  • From the field to the ice.

  • Today's positive athlete story actually

  • spotlights two people--

  • they're brothers in ice hockey, brothers

  • in the fight against cancer, and they're brothers.

  • Their names are Charlie and Will Capalbo Charlie has been

  • battling two kinds of cancer and along with his attitude,

  • the help he's getting from his family and community

  • is an inspiration.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: My favorite thing

  • about being out on the ice is just

  • to feel the wind on your face.

  • WILL CAPALBO: The freedom, just being out there.

  • I don't have anything else that bothers me.

  • I get to think about Charlie, too.

  • JEN CAPALBO: They're incredibly resilient

  • and it was so hard for him to see

  • his older brother who he idolized his whole life

  • suddenly weak and sick.

  • And then there was some hope for him,

  • that he might be the person who could be the cure for Charlie

  • with his bone marrow.

  • ANTHONY CAPALBO: It's about a 25% chance

  • that a sibling can be a match for a sibling.

  • JEN CAPALBO: The doctor stopped by to tell

  • us that Will was the match.

  • And we were so excited, we wanted to call him.

  • But I said to him, I said let's FaceTime.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: You are my match.

  • WILL CAPALBO: What?

  • No. CHARLIE CAPALBO: Yeah.

  • WILL CAPALBO: Seriously?

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: You're nine out of 10 match.

  • WILL CAPALBO: It was an unbelievable moment.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: Just like, complete shock.

  • And to have a sibling donor, just makes everything about it

  • better.

  • ANTHONY CAPALBO: It really helped Will because it really--

  • it gave him something he can do, rather than just being there.

  • JEN CAPALBO: Charlie had his transplant with Will's cells

  • on February 4th.

  • There is evidence that Will's cells are working

  • and Charlie's body is accepting them and producing

  • his own cells from it.

  • WILL CAPALBO: To be able to take bone marrow out of myself

  • and put it in him to cure him, it's

  • just kind of really powerful.

  • JEN CAPALBO: When Charlie first got sick and, you know,

  • the news hit social media, I was totally overwhelmed

  • and not prepared for how awesome and loving

  • people were going to be.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: Totally unbelievable, unimaginable.

  • A lot of it comes from the hockey community.

  • ANTHONY CAPALBO: It's just been nonstop, literally thousands

  • of people have done something.

  • And it gets overwhelming at times.

  • MILAN LUCIC: Hey, Charlie, it's Milan Lucic.

  • - Shawn Thornton.

  • HENRIK LUNDQVIST: Hey, Charlie, Henrik Lundqvist

  • here from the Rangers.

  • JOHN CENA: John Cena, here.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: I want to thank everybody.

  • JOHN CENA: This phrase right here--

  • has got me through a lot of tough times.

  • Keep up the fight, man.

  • CHARLIE CAPALBO: I think playing goalie really prepped me

  • for some of the stuff that I was going

  • to have to deal with here, mentally

  • and physically-- more mentally.

  • ANTHONY CAPALBO: Just to see him suit up again,

  • that would be pretty powerful, emotional.

  • And I don't know if I'd be able to handle it,

  • but it would be nice.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: For today's 10 out of 10 segment,

  • firefighter dodgeball sounds like it'd be a pretty

  • intense variation of the sport.

  • But when they're fully suited up,

  • there's more to it than just having to dodge,

  • duck, dip, dive, and dodge.

  • Firefighters from two New York departments

  • were taking part in a drill to see

  • how long their air cylinders last

  • during a time of high activity.

  • The answer ranged from 25 minutes to 51 minutes.

  • The research wasn't as hotly contested as the game.

  • Even if a burning spirit of competition

  • flared up, at some point, both teams would run out of air

  • and need a breather.

  • Still, the question remains, did the losing team feel smoked,

  • hosed, or just burned out?

  • With firefighters, I guess it's always the latter.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN 10.

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CNN 10 | CNN Student News | April 10 2019

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