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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Hey everyone.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • Welcome to "CNN 10".

  • A shakeup in the US government leads off today's show.

  • Yesterday, the White House announced that Randolph "Tex"

  • Alles, the Director of the US Secret Service,

  • would be leaving his position.

  • Director Alles says he was told weeks

  • ago that changes were coming.

  • The White House thanked him for his decades of service,

  • and said he did a great job.

  • But the Secret Service came under scrutiny recently

  • after an arrest was made at a resort in Florida owned

  • by US President Donald Trump.

  • He's met several international leaders at his Mar-a-Lago club,

  • and the accused trust passer is a Chinese woman who'd

  • gotten past security, carrying Chinese passports and a flash

  • drive with computer-threatening malware.

  • The Secret Service says, it does not decide

  • who gets into the resort.

  • But the incident raised security questions,

  • even though the White House says Alles'

  • departure isn't related to it.

  • Meantime, Alles' boss, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen

  • Nielsen is leaving her job.

  • President Trump made that announcement on Sunday.

  • In her resignation letter, Secretary Nielsen

  • praised the department's workers for their service

  • and sacrifices, and said she hoped the next Secretary would

  • have congressional support in fixing the laws that

  • have, quote, "impeded our ability to fully

  • secure America's borders".

  • The southern border with Mexico has been a major focus

  • of the Trump administration.

  • Last month, US officials estimated

  • they'd stopped 100,000 people there

  • from entering the US illegally.

  • The government says that's the highest monthly number of

  • migrants in more than a decade.

  • Observers say the President was getting more

  • and more frustrated about it.

  • He'd even threatened to close the border.

  • Congressional Democrats say Secretary Nielsen's resignation

  • shows how the Trump administration's

  • border security and immigration policies have failed.

  • Congressional Republicans say Nielsen served honorably,

  • and that they're confident the Homeland Security

  • Department is in good hands.

  • Kevin McAleenan, the current US Customs and Border

  • Commissioner, will serve as temporary DHS Secretary

  • until Nielsen's replacement is confirmed by the Senate.

  • ED LAVANDERA: Well really, what's going on at the border

  • is-- it's almost like two different things,

  • this confluence of events.

  • DHS and government officials are predicting

  • a system wide failure because of these increased

  • numbers of migrants.

  • CARL AZUZ: I told everybody.

  • This is-- you have a national emergency at our border.

  • ED LAVANDERA: With everything that federal government

  • officials are saying, there is also coming with it

  • a great deal of scrutiny.

  • Many critics of the Trump administration

  • are saying, what they're trying to do

  • is to create this sense of chaos to further

  • their case for the national emergency

  • in constructing more border wall.

  • CHRISTINA PATINO HOULE: What we see

  • is that our community is being instrumentalized as a tool

  • in a larger political game.

  • ROSA FLORES: I'm at the McAllen Produce Terminal.

  • Trucks are supposed to be coming in here from Mexico--

  • You?

  • See the pinata there--

  • with fresh fruits, vegetables, and other goods.

  • When you go to the grocery store,

  • and you select your fruits and vegetables,

  • they're most likely coming from this part of the country.

  • Because of the migrant surge, border patrol

  • has reallocated resources from the port of entry

  • to areas where migrants need to be processed.

  • CARL AZUZ: For the first time, the United States

  • says part of another nation's government

  • is a foreign terrorist organization.

  • That other nation is Iran, and the part of its government

  • that received the designation is the Islamic Revolutionary

  • Guard Corps, or IRGC.

  • According to Encyclopedia Britannica,

  • this is the second largest part of Iran's

  • military behind its army.

  • The IRGC leads or supports Iranian forces

  • in both internal conflicts and international war.

  • And US government officials cited several examples

  • of how the Iranian unit has participated

  • in violence worldwide.

  • MIKE POMPEO: For 40 years, the Islamic Republic's

  • Revolutionary Guard Corps has actively engaged in terrorism

  • and created, supported, and directed

  • other terrorist groups.

  • The IRGC masquerades as a legitimate

  • military organization, but none of us should be fooled.

  • It regularly violates the laws of armed conflict.

  • It plans, organizes, and executes terror

  • campaigns all around the world.

  • CARL AZUZ: The IRGC is also highly

  • influential in Iranian life.

  • The US government says it controls up to half

  • of Iran's economy by allegedly stealing from the people.

  • In designating it a terrorist group,

  • the US is pressuring Iran by telling international banks

  • and businesses to stop any dealings with this part

  • of Iran's government.

  • NICK PATON WALSH: It means that there are significantly

  • more measures the US can take against anybody considered

  • to have given tangible or intangible assistance

  • to the IRGC, anywhere in the world.

  • They can be prosecuted on US soil

  • or have proceedings brought against them.

  • So it enormously increases the tool box for US prosecutors

  • or defense officials, potentially,

  • if they choose to make moves against the IRGC.

  • But I have to say, because it's never

  • happened before, we don't really quite know how

  • practically it will be applied.

  • The point is though it's very hard

  • to talk, we're hearing from the Trump administration,

  • against Iran.

  • CARL AZUZ: The US says it's been preparing

  • to do this for months, and Iran retaliated

  • yesterday by declaring the United States

  • a state sponsor of terrorism.

  • The Middle Eastern country says it considers American troops

  • operating in the region to be terrorist groups,

  • and that the US government would be

  • responsible for what Iran called the dangerous consequences.

  • This is all according to Iran's government

  • controlled news agency.

  • We're not sure how any of this will play out.

  • The US government says its IRGC designation

  • will take effect on Monday.

  • 10 second trivia--

  • [BEEPING]

  • Which of these companies currently

  • sells a smartphone that works on America's budding 5G network?

  • Samsung, Apple, Google, or none of these?

  • At this moment, there's not a phone on the market that's

  • fully compatible with 5G.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Motorola offers a modification that makes one of its phones

  • 5G compatible, and Samsung plans to release

  • a new 5G phone this summer.

  • How big is the network they have to run on?

  • Well, it's not.

  • Verizon has 5G available in several US cities,

  • and AT&T, which owns CNN's parent company, Warner Media,

  • says it's launched 5G in more than a dozen places.

  • Industry analysts expect 5G to be

  • available in 92 American cities by the end of the year.

  • And as far as 5G readiness goes, a group

  • that represents the American wireless industry

  • says the US and China are now tied for first place,

  • and services are also available in several South Korean cities.

  • But why are tech enthusiasts so excited about this?

  • Why does it matter?

  • According to the Cellular Technology Industry

  • Association, 5G is going to be a major factor in the US economy,

  • changing education, robotics, and medicine.

  • - Self-driving cars, smart cities,

  • fully connected homes, robots--

  • this is the future, and it will be powered by 5G.

  • The G stands for generation, as in next generation wireless

  • network, and it's going to be fast--

  • about 10 times faster than the 4G network on your phone

  • right now.

  • Today it takes about six minutes to download a 3D movie on 4G.

  • With 5G, it will be 30 seconds.

  • But 5G is about more than just super fast downloads

  • and fewer dropped calls.

  • It's really about connecting the internet of things--

  • all those sensors, thermostats, cars, robots.

  • Right now, 4G just doesn't have the bandwidth

  • for all those devices.

  • But 5G will.

  • That's why it's a game changer.

  • Imagine self-driving cars instantly

  • communicating with traffic lights and other cars,

  • or a surgeon with VR equipment and special gloves,

  • operating remotely on a patient thousands of miles away.

  • 5G will make that possible.

  • But when?

  • 2020 is a working date for most of the wireless industry.

  • Four nationwide carriers are already testing the technology.

  • Chip makers are building processors and radios

  • for 5G communication, and network equipment companies

  • are building the backbone.

  • But the future won't come cheap.

  • 5G signals are powerful, but they don't reach as far.

  • Making it work will require thousands, maybe even

  • millions of mini cell phone towers

  • pretty much everywhere you can imagine-- lamp posts,

  • the side of every building, maybe even

  • in every room of your home.

  • That's why rolling out 5G to the entire United States

  • could cost $300 billion.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Sometimes a single picture can tell the story,

  • and here's that story.

  • Most pythons found in southern Florida

  • are between 6 and 10 feet long.

  • This female was more than 17 feet long.

  • She weighed 140 pounds, and she was pregnant with 73

  • developing eggs.

  • Pythons are an invasive species in the region.

  • They began showing up in Everglades National Park

  • in the 1980s, probably from pet owners

  • who didn't want them anymore.

  • So they were willing to let pythons be bygones.

  • But with so many snakes alive, they

  • threatened to change the region's ecological history.

  • One that big would make some folks jump out of their skin,

  • while others would want to bifold it into a wallet

  • or try it on for shoe size.

  • Whether you'd want her constrictly gone

  • or you'd leather alone, a snake that big is truly python-ic.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

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CNN 10 | CNN Student News | April 9 2019

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