Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • [TICKING]

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: A change in policy concerning

  • the United States and Israel is our first subject

  • today on "CNN 10."

  • Welcome to our viewers worldwide.

  • I'm Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

  • Last week US President Donald Trump

  • said he'd sign a proclamation recognizing

  • a territory called the Golan Heights

  • as being part of Israel.

  • Yesterday he did it.

  • With Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu standing

  • next to him, the American leader put pen to paper during

  • a ceremony at the White House.

  • Here's why this is significant and controversial.

  • The Golan Heights is a rocky plateau in the Middle East.

  • It was part of southwestern Syria in 1967.

  • But during the Six-Day War, which was fought that year,

  • Israel captured large amounts of territory

  • from the neighboring countries of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria.

  • The Golan Heights was part of that land.

  • OREN LIEBERMANN: Here in the Golan Heights, where

  • there is years of evidence of fighting

  • between Israel and Syria.

  • Israeli forces seized this mountainous territory

  • from Syria in 1967 during the Six-Day War.

  • And since then, it's been considered occupied territory

  • by the international community and the United

  • Nations Security Council.

  • Israel annexed the Golan in 1981.

  • But no country in the world had ever recognized

  • that annexation until now.

  • US President Donald Trump overturning decades

  • of US foreign policy, breaking the international consensus,

  • and saying it's time to recognize

  • Israeli sovereignty here because of its strategic significance.

  • Anyone positioned here has a great vantage point from which

  • to look into southern Syria on one side and northern Israel

  • on the other.

  • CARL AZUZ: So Israel considers the Golan

  • Heights part of its country.

  • And it has settlements there with thousands

  • of Jewish Israelis sharing the land

  • with other groups of people.

  • President Trump said the US proclamation

  • to recognize Golan as part of Israel

  • should have taken place decades ago.

  • Several other countries disagreed.

  • They don't think the Golan Heights should be

  • recognized as part of Israel.

  • The European Union is among them.

  • And the government of Syria called the US proclamation

  • a violation of international standards

  • and said the Golan Heights was and would

  • remain Arab and Syrian.

  • The signing ceremony was held weeks

  • before an election in Israel.

  • And it was expected to help the incumbent leader.

  • Prime Minister Netanyahu shorten his trip to the US,

  • though, after a rocket was fired from the Palestinian territory

  • of Gaza Monday morning.

  • It hit a house in central Israel,

  • injuring seven civilians there.

  • The Israeli military said it would strike targets

  • in Gaza that belong to the terrorist group that

  • was responsible.

  • All this came as another example of tensions

  • in a historically conflicted region.

  • Moving south from the Middle East,

  • we're taking you to the African nation of Mozambique,

  • where international aid workers say

  • the destruction from Cyclone Idai

  • is worse than they imagined.

  • The Category 2 storm that made landfall on March 14

  • wasn't the strongest to hit Mozambique.

  • But it came after heavy rains had already soaked and flooded

  • parts of the region.

  • And UNICEF says 1.7 million people

  • across Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe were affected.

  • Some of the flooding can be seen from space.

  • Survivors say many people are still trapped in their homes.

  • Rescuers say they still can't get to some areas.

  • And though hundreds of people are known

  • to have died in the catastrophe, some experts say the final toll

  • could be more than 1,000.

  • Officials are calling for the Mozambican government

  • and other countries to step up rescue and recovery efforts.

  • 10-second trivia-- what country is the world's

  • largest producer of oil?

  • United States, Saudi Arabia, Russia, or Canada?

  • [MUSIC PLAYING AND BEEPING]

  • These are the top four in order, with the United

  • States having surpassed every other nation in oil production.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • But the US still relies on other countries

  • for certain types of oil.

  • So even though America's the world's biggest producer

  • overall, the production by other nations,

  • especially those in an oil-producing organization

  • named OPEC, can still have an effect on crude oil prices.

  • And that's the single biggest factor

  • in gasoline prices in the US.

  • Though they stalled a bit this week,

  • they've been rising since January.

  • And OPEC is part of the reason why.

  • CHRISTINE ROMANS: OPEC is often accused

  • of artificially boosting oil prices

  • and ripping off consumers.

  • In reality, OPEC isn't as powerful as it used

  • to be for two main reasons.

  • First, the fracking revolution in the US over the last decade

  • has made America much less reliant on its product.

  • And second, Saudi Arabia hasn't been able to effectively

  • control the other OPEC members.

  • OPEC stands for the Organization of Petroleum

  • Exporting Countries.

  • Its members control about 40% of the world's oil supply.

  • And they're supposed to work together to decide

  • how much oil to produce.

  • It's simple supply and demand.

  • To raise the price of oil, OPEC members

  • simply agree to produce less.

  • To lower the price, they produce more.

  • But it doesn't always work out like that--

  • at least, not anymore.

  • JEFF COLGAN: OPEC gained its reputation

  • to control global oil markets in the 1973 oil crisis

  • basically because some of the members of OPEC

  • put an embargo on the United States.

  • RICHARD NIXON: The sudden cutoff of oil from the Middle East

  • turned the serious energy shortages

  • we expected this winter into a major energy crisis.

  • CHRISTINE ROMANS: But along the way,

  • OPEC countries basically stopped listening to the group's

  • de facto leader, Saudi Arabia.

  • The Gulf nation would set the oil production

  • goals for the other members.

  • But the other countries didn't always comply.

  • JEFF COLGAN: If the other members joined Saudi Arabia

  • and actually stuck to their production quotas,

  • they could change the price of global oil by quite a bit.

  • But the problem is that other members of OPEC

  • have the incentive to cheat because they're producing

  • considerably less and at the margin,

  • they need the money a lot more than Saudi Arabia does.

  • CHRISTINE ROMANS: OPEC's power had been slipping for decades.

  • Then came America's fracking revolution.

  • Before 2008, the United States imported most of its crude.

  • But technological innovation allowed US companies to tap

  • into vast shale oil reserves.

  • Last year, the United States became the largest producer

  • of crude oil in the world, edging out both Russia

  • and Saudi Arabia.

  • MATT EGAN: So there's no doubt that shale has reshaped

  • the global energy landscape.

  • But America can't live on shale alone.

  • Shale is very light.

  • And American refineries require that really light shale

  • to be mixed with heavy crude, which is often found with OPEC.

  • CHRISTINE ROMANS: So don't count OPEC out completely.

  • It may not wield the same power as the 1970s,

  • but it still plays a role.

  • CARL AZUZ: The northern lights, AKA aurora borealis,

  • are commonly seen in the Arctic Circle.

  • Think Alaska, Canada, Iceland, and Norway.

  • They're not usually seen as far south as the US state of Iowa.

  • But because a solar storm was hurtling toward Earth

  • last weekend, scientists at the National Oceanic

  • and Atmospheric Administration thought that maybe, just maybe,

  • some states in the lower 48 would

  • also see the northern lights.

  • Well, they didn't.

  • Researchers say the storm didn't make enough of a direct hit

  • to bring the northern lights farther south.

  • But when geomagnetic storms from the Sun

  • do smack into the Earth's atmosphere--

  • JENNIFER GRAY: Described as one of Earth's greatest

  • light shows, an aurora is one of the most

  • fascinating and beautiful naturally occurring phenomena.

  • You might know it as the northern lights,

  • but it's technically called the aurora borealis in the Northern

  • Hemisphere and the aurora australis, or southern lights,

  • in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • This phenomenon occurs above the magnetic poles in the Northern

  • and Southern Hemispheres.

  • They form when gaseous particles in the Earth's

  • atmosphere collide with charged particles

  • released from the Sun.

  • Electrons and protons from the Sun are blown toward the Earth

  • by the solar wind.

  • As these are carried towards Earth, most of them

  • are deflected by Earth's magnetic field.

  • However, the magnetic field is weaker at the poles,

  • allowing some of the particles to funnel

  • into the Earth's atmosphere.

  • The vibrant colors produced are determined by the type

  • of gases that are colliding.

  • The result is a brilliant display

  • of the common green and yellow, less common blue and violet,

  • even rare reds painting the night sky in ribbons,

  • arcs, or shooting rays.

  • Oxygen produces green and red light, while nitrogen

  • gives off blue and purple.

  • The best time of year to view the light show

  • is during the winter months, when

  • the nights are longer, under a cloud-free sky,

  • away from light pollution.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: It's not always a good thing when

  • someone calls you "honey bear."

  • It could mean there's been a theft.

  • The evidence-- beehives at Pennsylvania's

  • Susquehanna University were recently

  • found toppled and slobbered on.

  • There were no witnesses.

  • But there is a suspect.

  • And here is the awesome wanted sketch.

  • While the Pennsylvania Game Commission

  • is trying to trap the perpetrator with donuts,

  • electric fencing has been put up around the remaining beehives.

  • So the thief may strike again, but can he "bear" the shock?

  • It would "be-hive" him to take flight and "honey-comb"

  • a different place for food.

  • Of course, he could always brood around the yard

  • in search of another colony.

  • But before the insects were to drone on about one,

  • they'd say it's none of his beeswax.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, and that's the buzz on CNN.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[TICKING]

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

[CNN 10] March 26, 2019

  • 342 5
    Yukiko posted on 2019/03/28
Video vocabulary