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  • [explosion]

  • (male narrator) 1947: shortly after the close of World War II,

  • 23 nations signed a general agreement

  • on tariffs and trade,

  • the GATT.

  • Its purpose was to liberalize and expand world trade.

  • Stability, a sense of global community:

  • they were the key.

  • For five decades, the GATT will grow,

  • adding more members and becoming the World Trade Organization.

  • (man) We are writing the constitution for a single global economy.

  • (narrator) With over 150 member nations,

  • the WTO controls 90% of world trade.

  • Unlike the GATT, the WTO can impose punishing fines

  • on member countries that don't abide by its laws.

  • Along with this expansion of free trade,

  • the WTO avows to help developing countries

  • benefit fully from the global trading system.

  • (woman) It has very little to do with trade,

  • and it's certainly not free.

  • (man) It's a system of global governance

  • none of us voted for and none of us control.

  • (man) It simply means breaking down the borders of countries.

  • (man) So that large corporations

  • will be free to operate anywhere without interference

  • by governments or the people of these nations.

  • (man) And what they are saying

  • is that money values should rule over life values,

  • that human rights and the environment

  • should be subordinated to the needs of commerce.

  • (man) The clean air rules were gutted.

  • (man) Cases of asthma increased.

  • (man) Genetically modified foods forced onto European consumers.

  • (man) Small-scale banana growers crushed by large corporations.

  • (narrator) Despite the problems and criticism,

  • the WTO continues to grow,

  • making it more powerful than ever.

  • On the upcoming meeting in Seattle,

  • dubbed the Millennium Round,

  • new issues will be added to the WTO's existing rules.

  • (man) Imposing even tighter corporate control

  • over more areas of our lives.

  • (narrator) To many, this meeting has become a battle

  • for the future.

  • [woman grunting]

  • All right, here, you take this, man.

  • Jay, she's turtling.

  • [grunts]

  • Shit. Hold it.

  • Okay, you drop the rope.

  • All right, I'm coming to get you.

  • It's all right. I got you.

  • Not much of a last-minute replacement, am I?

  • No, but you're better-looking than he was.

  • Hey, don't get any ideas.

  • I must have checked everything three times.

  • I never ended up like this before.

  • (man) That's why you got to be

  • a little crazy to take this gig.

  • All right, you're good.

  • Okay, you wait for my signal before we descend, all right?

  • I'm Lou, by the way.

  • Oh. Jay.

  • [siren wails faintly]

  • We better get going before you're eating breakfast in jail.

  • I don't plan on getting arrested until at least tomorrow.

  • [crane creaks]

  • Fuck.

  • Close one.

  • Yeah, real smooth.

  • All right, let's do it.

  • [chuckles]

  • (man) Tomorrow, the World Trade Organization

  • will meet in Seattle.

  • It will be the largest meeting on global trade ever known...

  • (woman) Jimmy Hoffa and the labor unions,

  • along with environmentalists and human rights advocates,

  • put together a rally at Memorial Stadium

  • with an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 people.

  • (man) More than 50,000 protestors

  • may be in the streets to demonstrate against the WTO.

  • (woman) It's been 30 years since the Democratic convention riots

  • in 1968 pitted police and protestors against each other.

  • But some fear history will repeat itself

  • this week in Seattle

  • as the World Trade Organization prepares to hold

  • its first ever ministerial meeting on U.S. soil.

  • We have identified the subjects

  • of our most recent surveillance photos,

  • and they're not anarchists as we originally thought.

  • All right, so we have a great team of lawyers

  • that are pulling together to help us out on this.

  • It's really important that you call this number.

  • (man) All right, Jay!

  • All right.

  • [cheers and applause]

  • First one: Django Mills,

  • arrested in four different countries for property damage

  • involving whaling ships and shrimp trawlers.

  • Louise Phillips:

  • burned down her father's animal research lab,

  • although she wasn't formally charged.

  • She has been involved in Black Bloc demonstrations

  • that have turned violent.

  • Samantha Clayton: no criminal record,

  • appears to have studied law,

  • and was involved in the Sequoia Forest legal case

  • back in '98.

  • And last but not least, Jay Elgin.

  • We got 13 major intersections downtown,

  • and each of the affinity groups are gonna shut these areas down.

  • Now, how are we gonna do it?

  • (man) Nonviolently.

  • That's right, and by consensus.

  • Jay's brother was killed

  • in the Sequoia Forest demonstration.

  • (Jay) Help! Help!

  • My brother's been hit.

  • My brother's been hit! Get an ambulance!

  • My brother's been hit.

  • [men scuffling]

  • Don't arrest me! My brother's been hit!

  • We need an ambulance!

  • Since then, he's been involved

  • in every major demonstration across the country,

  • including getting himself arrested at the IMF in '98.

  • We need a show of hands of those of you

  • that are prepared to go to jail if need be.

  • And don't feel bad if you're not.

  • We need as many people on the outside as we can get.

  • All right, people,

  • well, opening ceremonies begin in about 24 hours,

  • so please get ready

  • 'cause we're gonna shut these motherfuckers down!

  • All right?

  • [cheers and applause]

  • We set up two tripwire barricades

  • around the Paramount Theatre.

  • Now, we believe that all the protestors

  • will be concentrated there.

  • Now, to get through that,

  • they're gonna have to climb fences,

  • jump over Metro buses,

  • at which point they'll be arrested.

  • Well, make sure we're only arresting them there, okay?

  • I want to keep this city's image clean.

  • How many protestors are we expecting?

  • Several thousand. Maybe 10,000.

  • Are we ready for this?

  • Quite sure of it.

  • The WTO opening ceremonies are scheduled to take place

  • at the Paramount Theatre downtown.

  • [woman over radio] Issues such as human rights,

  • labor standards, and environmental protection

  • are not on the formal agenda of the Seattle meeting,

  • but with more than 20,000 WTO critics planning to march,

  • it looks as though...

  • What? That makes no sense to you?

  • I'm just looking for a good story.

  • [heartbeat pulsing rapidly]

  • (woman) Nothing irregular.

  • Everything seems great.

  • Looks like you're going to be having a very healthy baby

  • four months from now.

  • [sighs]

  • Ah.

  • Have you chosen any names yet?

  • No, not--not-- not really.

  • Yeah, well, there's a few we like, right?

  • Yeah, she has a few she likes.

  • [laughs]

  • I got to go, baby.

  • Oh, no. Don't go now.

  • I wish I didn't have to, but I'm running late as it is.

  • I love you, baby.

  • Come on, five more minutes.

  • This protest is driving me crazy.

  • It hasn't even started yet.

  • Oh, come on.

  • I'll call you.

  • Doc, will you look after this woman?

  • 'Cause she's made me very happy.

  • (woman) I sure will.

  • I'll see you.

  • [applause]

  • (man) It's taken two years

  • to bring the World Trade Organization to Seattle,

  • and we did it.

  • [applause]

  • (man) Nathan, you've arrived, safe and sound.

  • May I present Nathan Abasi,

  • one of the toughest negotiators in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • (Abasi) I bet Mr. Dural was telling you

  • I will be cutting agricultural resources.

  • [all chuckle]

  • Along the way, the Emerald City has beaten out Detroit,

  • Denver, Dallas, San Diego, and Honolulu.

  • Oh, have you met Dr. Alex Maric?

  • He's from Bosnia but works in Africa

  • withdecins Sans Frontières.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • Nice to meet you too.

  • He's here to raise awareness about cost of AIDS medications.

  • Oh.

  • Yeah.

  • [Abasi chuckles] Well, I hope

  • you have more luck at these talks than I usually do.

  • [man chuckles]

  • I welcome all of you

  • for what will be a productive and successful week.

  • To success.

  • (man) Thank you. Thank you all.

  • [applause]

  • [cheers and applause]

  • (man) Well, I've just been to the WTO cocktail party...

  • [crowd boos]

  • Where the hors d'oeuvres were much better

  • but the music not so good.

  • [laughter]

  • You may or may not know this,

  • but I was once a protestor too during Vietnam,

  • so I'm happy to have

  • the demonstrator's voice be heard.

  • In turn, I've been promised by numerous organizations

  • that there will be no violence.

  • If we stick to this plan,

  • I believe we will achieve all that is hoped for.

  • What I'm trying to say is, be tough on your issues,

  • but be gentle on my town.

  • Thank you. Thank you.

  • [applause]

  • [laughs]

  • All right.

  • Six months' planning, here we go.

  • What time is it?

  • Don't know.

  • That was nice last night.

  • We should get going.

  • What?

  • Man, you are not much of a morning person, are you?

  • (man #1) You check the roster?

  • (man #2) I don't think you can call in sick today.

  • Heads up.

  • Chief said there might be chemical or bio attacks today.

  • (man) My fucking chemicals right here.

  • Oh, yeah?

  • I think if there was gonna be chemical warfare,

  • we'd have more than a couple hundred guys out there.

  • How's Ella and the baby?

  • Ah, great.

  • Yeah, we went for the ultrasound yesterday,

  • and you can see the whole little body

  • and even down to the little fingers.

  • And then you hear the heartbeat...

  • [imitates heartbeat]

  • Really fast, like the little guy was saying,

  • "Hi, Daddy. Hi, Daddy. Hi, Daddy.

  • Hi, Daddy. Hi, Daddy."

  • (Jay) So how'd you get into this?

  • What are you, a cop?

  • Yeah.

  • And if you don't answer my questions,

  • I'm gonna handcuff you.

  • When I was an animal activist,

  • I used to think the strong prey on the