Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • [CLOCK TICKING]

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: One thing that pizza, puppies,

  • and Fridays have in common?

  • It's called awesome.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • This is CNN 10.

  • Welcome to the show.

  • Our first topic on this 1st of March?

  • No deal.

  • In the second summit between the leaders of the United States

  • and North Korea, an agreement was not

  • reached for the communist country

  • to give up its nuclear program and the democratic country

  • to remove the economic penalties on its rival.

  • The summit ended early.

  • After meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un

  • Thursday, US President Donald Trump

  • said they made a lot of progress and have a, quote,

  • "very special relationship."

  • But he added that sometimes you have to walk away from a deal.

  • DONALD TRUMP: You have to be prepared to walk.

  • And there was a potential.

  • We could have signed something today,

  • I could have 100% signed something today.

  • We actually had papers ready to be signed,

  • but it just wasn't appropriate.

  • I want to do it right.

  • I'd much rather do it right than do it fast.

  • CARL AZUZ: So why wasn't an agreement reached?

  • CNN reports that the communist country offered to eliminate

  • part of its nuclear program, but that it wanted

  • the US to completely remove its sanctions

  • on North Korea's economy.

  • President Trump said America couldn't do that.

  • In a rare news conference after their summit,

  • North Korea's foreign minister said

  • his country would permanently and completely remove

  • all nuclear materials from its main production site

  • and that North Korea only asked for partial relief

  • from the US sanctions.

  • The North Korean official called it a realistic proposal.

  • Before the summit, US and North Korean

  • negotiators had been working on the terms

  • of an agreement for weeks.

  • So some analysts say that the failure of the leaders

  • to finalize it suggests it might have

  • still been too soon for them to actually get together.

  • A date for another meeting between them

  • hasn't been set, according to the White House,

  • but President Trump says America's conversation with

  • North Korea would continue.

  • - 10-Second Trivia.

  • What is the state flower of California?

  • Golden Columbine, Cherokee rose, golden poppy, or apple blossom?

  • [BEEPING]

  • A fitting flower for the Golden State

  • is the golden poppy, also known as the California Poppy.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: A high school basketball player

  • named Jordan Tuff is making headlines

  • beyond her hometown of Kernersville, North Carolina.

  • She is the latest highlight of our Positive Athletes series.

  • It reports on high school athletes who shine in the game,

  • in their schools, and in their communities.

  • If that sounds like someone you know,

  • you can nominate him or her at cnn.com/positiveathlete.

  • Here's how Jordan's inspiring the next generation

  • of basketball players.

  • JORDAN TUFF: I love the game.

  • It's everything.

  • It means everything to me.

  • I first started playing basketball

  • pretty much in kindergarten.

  • When I first picked it up, I just

  • knew I fell in love with it I've won a few MVPs at

  • some big tournaments this year.

  • Recently, on our senior night, I got 150 career made 3s,

  • 500 rebounds, and 1,000 points.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • DELANEY RUDD: Like every kid, Jordan's goals were always

  • to play at the highest level.

  • They always wanted to play on national TV,

  • to be the big star on national TV, the All-American,

  • all our plays.

  • Jordan, as a teammate, she's encouraging.

  • She sets examples by working hard.

  • She's a let's go, c'mon, y'all type of kid.

  • JORDAN TUFF: On the team, I feel like I'm a leader.

  • I control the tempo of the game I feel

  • like I'm just that glue piece that really

  • brings the team together.

  • I love to be that.

  • DELANEY RUDD: Well she started working with basketball camp

  • simply because I identified that she was the type of person that

  • could work with young kids.

  • JORDAN TUFF: I love basketball, so teaching

  • kids who love it and are just excited to play

  • is a great feeling.

  • Dreams in Motion is a camp run by my coach, Delaney Rudd.

  • We have a kids' basketball camp, a bunch of little kids.

  • We go through skills.

  • We teach them just basic fundamentals.

  • DELANEY RUDD: She's able to communicate,

  • because she's still a kid.

  • She can say, hey, I'm going to college

  • to play college basketball.

  • I played the highest level in high school.

  • I accomplished this.

  • I still accomplished my academic success.

  • For a little kid--

  • may need that.

  • JORDAN TUFF: I mean, my coach--

  • he's worked us and helped us to become

  • the players we are today.

  • And when me and my teammates are helping coach these kids,

  • we're full of energy.

  • We're just as excited as they are.

  • So it's great being out here on the floor with them,

  • because maybe one day, they'll want to play basketball, too.

  • And for us to have a part in that is very important.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Skijoring, or skioring, is a sport

  • you might not be familiar with.

  • It combines the danger of skiing with the danger

  • of horse racing for an unforgettable wintertime event.

  • At a resort in southeastern Switzerland,

  • you have to be at least 18 years old

  • to participate in skijoring.

  • You have to pass both fitness and intellectual tests,

  • and you have to wear body armor.

  • A two-times skijoring winner says, you

  • also have to give it a shot.

  • [MUSIC - THE NUTCRACKER, "RUSSIAN DANCE"]

  • VALERIA HOLINGER: Skijoring is a really special spot.

  • We only do it here in St. Moritz.

  • We need the thoroughbred in front and the skier behind.

  • I've done the skijoring the first time

  • when I was 18 years old, and I did it

  • because it's amazing speed behind it,

  • and I love the adrenaline.

  • If you'd like to do skijoring, you

  • have to be, first of all, a really good skier,

  • because you have to have a good direction during the race.

  • And the second thing you need is to have

  • a good contact to your horse to understand

  • how the horse is working.

  • And to be a good horseman is really important.

  • And the third thing you have to be

  • is, you have to be really brave, because there

  • is a lot of kickback coming from your own horse,

  • and a lot of speed.

  • This is really important.

  • During the race, you need a really good

  • voice, because only with shouting,

  • we can make our horse faster.

  • So for example, it's like, Go, Becky!

  • You definitely have to try, because it's full

  • of adrenaline, full of speed, and it's in the nature

  • together with a wonderful thoroughbred in front of you,

  • and it's just amazing.

  • CARL AZUZ: Boring note.

  • Skijoring is for those who feel like soaring,

  • setting skis to snow and racing, with a horse

  • that does the pacing.

  • It's not horsing 'round.

  • It's horsing down a snowy track.

  • They risk it, because it's just like Elsa's magic harness,

  • right up to Seabiscuit.

  • You can diss it.

  • You can't miss it.

  • It's an equine kind of show that brings

  • tack and saddle-bitten bridle thundering over snow.

  • It combines the thrill of racing with the wintry sledding

  • fun of a horse-powered machine that's thoroughbred to run.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, photo finishing the week on CNN 10.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[CLOCK TICKING]

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

[CNN 10] March 1, 2019

  • 171 2
    Yukiko posted on 2019/03/12
Video vocabulary