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  • CARL AZUZ: Hi.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • And we thank you for joining us for what

  • could be described as a heroic special edition of "CNN 10."

  • We follow CNN heroes throughout the year on this show.

  • Last month, the 2017 CNN Hero of the Year was announced.

  • Amy Wright, a mother of two children with Down Syndrome,

  • became an advocate for people with special needs.

  • And her North Carolina coffee shop

  • named Bitty and Beau's, which now employs

  • 40 disabled employees, has won supporters, fans, and customers

  • from across the nation.

  • But there's another category of CNN heroes

  • that specifically honors young people.

  • It's called Young Wonders.

  • And today's special follows five of these extraordinary folks

  • in their work to help others in their communities.

  • - Hi, Jeffrey.

  • - Hey.

  • How you doin', man.

  • SIDNEY KEYS III: Ever since I was little,

  • I just loved to read.

  • I just love listening to different kinds of stories.

  • These books look very interesting, too.

  • I realized that there was a need for African-American literacy,

  • and boys to see themselves in books in a positive way.

  • Books n Bros is a book club where

  • we read about African-American literacy.

  • Hi.

  • My name is Sidney.

  • And my role is Head Bro in Charge,

  • also known as founder and CEO.

  • - Some people, they're surprised when I tell them,

  • like, I work for my son.

  • SIDNEY KEYS III: If you can make the sign-in sheet for like

  • the name and then like the bro.

  • Not many 11-year-olds run a meeting.

  • Usually they're just there.

  • The schedule is going to be, we're first

  • going to do an icebreaker.

  • It's an interesting experience because it's really

  • fun being able to control a whole bunch

  • of 20 and 30 year-olds.

  • RENELLE PARKER: My name's Renelle Parker,

  • and I'm a Big Bro.

  • SIDNEY KEYS III: Big Bros are basically mentors for the bros.

  • We wanted them to see positive African-American men.

  • And also, because they help out a lot with the book club,

  • with keeping the boys under control.

  • - Gentlemen, gentlemen.

  • - I'm super proud of him.

  • Words really can't even describe how proud I am.

  • SIDNEY KEYS III: I do really feel

  • like I'm making a positive impact in my community

  • because all the boys are having such

  • a good time in my book club.

  • I see all smiles on their faces.

  • I really feel like I'm making reading fun again.

  • - Cool bros read.

  • HAILE THOMAS: I love that you get to be

  • super creative with cooking.

  • It's really cool to see a bunch of ingredients that may not

  • have matched so classically come together

  • and really create something unique and super flavorful.

  • I love that aspect of just being able to kind of play

  • around with it like a science experiment

  • and see what happens.

  • Wow, this is so pretty.

  • We were completely able to reverse my dad's Type 2

  • Diabetes within about a year of just

  • really pushing the healthy eating

  • and changing our lifestyle habits.

  • - That's really good.

  • HAILE THOMAS: That's when I was super inspired

  • to share that with my peers.

  • We really just want to make sure that kids everywhere know how

  • to make a healthy choice and how they can incorporate

  • that into their everyday.

  • It's super important to know what's in our food.

  • Dextrose is another form of sugar.

  • And we already heard sugar before, right?

  • So we go over reading food labels,

  • researching ingredients.

  • You guys know what's in gelatin?

  • Pig skin.

  • Yeah.

  • You guys are going to make your own cereal.

  • It's super important for us to share

  • a healthy alternative that's fun to make, easy, and of course,

  • delicious.

  • Guys, it smells amazing.

  • These workshops definitely inspire and empower

  • kids to make healthier choices.

  • I'm proud of you guys.

  • It was so easy to make, right?

  • - Can I get a little bit more?

  • HAILE THOMAS: Yeah.

  • It's just that one moment where a kid realizes that they can do

  • better for themselves and their families

  • that is so important to me.

  • That's exactly what helped my dad get better.

  • When we are teaching kids how to fuel their bodies the best,

  • then they will ultimately have the energy

  • and vitality to be their best.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: That's definitely not water.

  • Recycling helps the earth, people, plants, animals,

  • and other living things.

  • I was three and a half and my dad and me took a bag of cans

  • to the recycling center and we got about $5.

  • And I like doing it, so I've been doing it ever since.

  • Ooh, I love these.

  • - It was his idea to enlist all of our neighbors

  • and to get more people recycling for him.

  • And the longer it went, the bigger it got.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: So I'll teach you some facts.

  • - It's a pleasure to meet you, sir.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: And there.

  • - Perfect.

  • Want to take the trash bin back to dad?

  • RYAN HICKMAN: My mom and dad and grandma, on Tuesday,

  • help me throw it.

  • - Don't throw it too fast.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: And then once we have a full bag, we load it up

  • in our truck, drive to the recycling center,

  • usually we're first in line.

  • - We estimate that Ryan's recycled

  • about 270,000 cans and bottles.

  • And I think that's about 60,000 pounds.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: And probably one of our bottles

  • is processing right on that conveyor belt.

  • - Good job, Ryan.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: Thank you.

  • - He's helping the environment.

  • I mean, for every 2,000 pounds that he recycles,

  • he saves at least 40 barrels of oil.

  • So he's doing his part.

  • RYAN HICKMAN: Great.

  • Thank you.

  • - I would probably not be doing this if it wasn't for Ryan.

  • He's opened my eyes to making a difference, for sure.

  • CHRISTINA LI: I really like computer

  • science just because there's so many possibilities with it.

  • You can program a spaceship or cars or robots.

  • I think computer science can be for anybody.

  • When I was in third grade, my brothers and I made

  • this character called Fish Guy.

  • So we made a website for it.

  • And that's what really got me into computer science.

  • In high school, I joined my robotics team.

  • I was the only female programmer and I

  • felt really weird about it.

  • It was very evident that this gender gap existed.

  • Go to x and y, zero, and then--

  • I decided to make a computer science

  • camp for middle school girls.

  • X V. That writes the score.

  • - Oh.

  • CHRISTINA LI: I named the camp Hello, World because I

  • wanted to have girls say hello to the world

  • of computer science.

  • How many of you guys have played Pong before?

  • It's an introduction so they can learn how to program

  • apps and robots and games.

  • - So I have a bluebird, currently.

  • And the bird flies through the tubes using the spacebar.

  • - I realized that it's actually not that hard.

  • When you click that On button, you

  • go crazy because it's working.

  • CHRISTINA LI: I just wanted to get them interested,

  • and like show them how cool the world of computer science is.

  • - When you press the down arrow, it will go back.

  • - Your game is literally out of this world.

  • - Pretty much.

  • CHRISTINA LI: Interacting with other girls

  • makes them realize they're not alone in this.

  • I really hope to show the girls that girls

  • can do anything they want to.

  • - Hello, world.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: The mission of my project

  • is to make people happy.

  • Hello.

  • - Hi.

  • It does get very lonely in hospital.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: I give them a bear

  • and try and cheer them up a bit.

  • - Thank you, Campbell.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: That's OK.

  • I hope you enjoy playing with him and cuddling him.

  • - When Campbell takes the bears to the hospital,

  • you see these very sick children pick straight up.

  • You feel the energy in the room.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: I got this bear for you.

  • - Thank you.

  • Getting a teddy from Campbell just feels great.

  • And it's a relief that I've got a friend there.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: Want this bear?

  • I think the magic in the bears is the hope.

  • It's the hope that the bears give the people.

  • I've been making bears over four years now.

  • - Campbell is just empathetic to a maximum level.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: This is just my thing, my hobby,

  • just what I love doing.

  • The top of the shelves are full of old hospital bears, come to

  • the hospital at Christmas time.

  • So this is Marvin.

  • And this is Melby.

  • This is Ouch.

  • When I start doing the faces and shaving and putting the eyes

  • and noses in, it it's really cool to see their personality

  • come together.

  • I reckon I've made over 12 to 1,400 bears.

  • It's a lot.

  • - So it started with a little idea,

  • I just want kids to have presents at Christmas time.

  • Now it's bears going in every direction, all over the world,

  • for every reason possible.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: I've sent them to lots of different people

  • that have been hurt in lots of different ways.

  • - I think he's, in a way, he's just

  • trying to hug the whole world better, to make it OK.

  • It's just love.

  • CAMPBELL REMESS: If everybody was kind and not mean,

  • it would change the world.

  • It would change the world a lot.

CARL AZUZ: Hi.

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CNN 10 - January 9, 2018

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    timmy posted on 2018/01/11
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