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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: After years of accusations, a famous athlete is coming clean.

  • Plus, we`re going to check out how a snake hunt is going in the national park.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • This is U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.

  • His task force has come up with a list of recommendations on addressing gun violence in the U.S.

  • It`s giving that list to President Obama, we should know some time today what his next step will be.

  • There are a couple of different paths the president could take.

  • One would be to encourage Congress to change laws like banning assault weapons or requiring background checks on buyers at gun shows.

  • But not everyone in Congress would support that, and the National Rifle Association is working to prevent any new restrictions on guns.

  • There`s something else the president could do, though, give an executive order.

  • AZUZ: U.S. presidents have been giving out executive orders since 1789.

  • Why? Because they can.

  • An executive order is a law made instantly with the president`s signature.

  • The advantage for a president is that it doesn`t have to go through Congress.

  • The disadvantage, say critics, is that it doesn`t have to go through Congress.

  • And some critics say, use of executive orders may violate the Constitutional separation of powers.

  • In fact, the term "executive order" isn`t in the Constitution.

  • What is in Article II, Section 3, is that the president shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed.

  • So, if a president feels that Congress isn`t faithfully executing the laws he wants, he can issue an executive order.

  • They do have their limits, though.

  • Executive orders can`t use federal money, for one thing.

  • So, a president couldn`t use one to cut taxes or build a bridge, for examples.

  • The orders can be overturned by a court, and the next president can get rid of a previous order.

  • Presidents ain`t shy about giving new ones, though.

  • According to the National Archives, two term President Bill Clinton gave 364 executive orders.

  • Two term President George W. Bush gave 291, President Obama is on the same pace having given 144 in his first term.

  • President Roosevelt holds the record -- he gave over 3700 executive orders, though he did have longer than everyone else in the White House.

  • Bottom line, love him or hate him, we all have to live under them, at least for a while.

  • Why? Well, that`s an order.

  • LANCE ARMSTRONG: I`ve said it for seven years, I`ve said it for longer than seven years

  • I have never doped.

  • I can say it again, but I`ve said it for seven years, it doesn`t help.

  • Why would I then enter into a sport and dope myself up and risk my life again?

  • That`s crazy, I would never do that, that`s -- no, no way.

  • AZUZ: That was Lance Armstrong in 2005.

  • He spent more than a decade saying things like that.

  • Denying that he cheated during his cycling career.

  • This week, he said something different.

  • According to reports, during an interview with Oprah Winfrey, Armstrong admitted to doping, to using performance-enhancing drugs.

  • That interview was airing later this week.

  • The reaction on social media was fast and a lot of it was angry.

  • One person said, "This guy is a loser and a liar."

  • Another post, "He had the opportunity to be honest from the beginning, winning was more important."

  • Why is this news getting such an intense reaction?

  • Well, the answer might come from looking at how Lance Armstrong got here.

  • Right as his cycling career was taking off, Armstrong was diagnosed with cancer.

  • It spread to his lungs, stomach and brain.

  • After surgery at late 1996, he was told he was cancer free.

  • The next year he helped create the Livestrong foundation, its goal is to benefit cancer research and cancer patients.

  • You`ve probably seen people wearing the yellow wristbands, you might have worn one yourself.

  • Armstrong`s efforts helped that foundation raise millions of dollars.

  • In 1999, less than three yeas after he beat cancer, Armstrong won the Tour de France.

  • Then he won it again, and again.

  • A cancer survivor winning cycling`s most famous race seven times in a row.

  • And despite accusations, always denying that he cheated to do it.

  • Then last year, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released a report.

  • It accused Armstrong of being at the center of a very sophisticated doping program while he was winning his Tour de France titles.

  • In the report, former teammates admitted to doping and ways of beating drug tests.

  • The International Cycling Union then stripped Lance Armstrong of all seven Tour titles and banned him from professional cycling for life.

  • Armstrong denied the allegations to all of it until this week.

  • Well, this is something we`re talking about on our blog, in a court of public opinion,

  • Lance Armstrong is in deep trouble, and the question we`re asking is, will the public ever forgive him?

  • Do you think the public ever should forgive him?

  • You could check it out on our blog, you`ll find it on our home page cnnstudentnews.com.

  • REP. SCOTT TIPTON, (R ), COLORADO: No person except the natural born citizen or a citizen of the United States at the time of the adoption of this Constitution shall be eligible to the office of president,

  • nor there shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained the age of 35 years,

  • and been 14 years a resident within the United States.

  • AZUZ: That was from Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution.

  • Yesterday, members of the U.S. House of Representatives read the whole thing.

  • It took them a little more than an hour, as members took turns reading different parts.

  • The people who organized the reading said the point is to focus on the country`s founding document,

  • and that`s what we are going to do right now.

  • Pop quiz style, you`re going to love it.

  • Question number one, which U.S president was called the "father of the Constitution"?

  • That nickname belonged to James Madison, the fourth U.S. President because he was so involved in the debate during the Constitutional Convention.

  • Next up, it took two thirds of the states to make the Constitution the law of the land.

  • Which state was the first to ratify it?

  • Delaware, sometimes called the first state because it was first.

  • All right, last question, you know that the first Ten Amendments make up the Bill of Rights.

  • How many amendments are there total?

  • Your answer: 27 Amendments. The most recent one was ratified in 1992.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Donagriche`s English classes at Central Middle School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

  • Which U.S. State is home to the Everglades National Park.

  • You know what to do.

  • Is it California, Florida, Hawaii or Louisiana?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Everglades National Park covers 1.5 million acres in Florida.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: The Everglades are home to some rare and endangered species, one of them is in danger and on purpose.

  • It`s the python challenge, and it started last weekend.

  • Officials say, tens of thousands of Burmese pythons are in the Everglades.

  • They are devouring other species.

  • And when authorities ran out of ideas, they turned to the public and offered cash prices to people who wanted to hunt the snakes down.

  • John Zarrella has more on how the hunt is going.

  • JOHN ZARRELLA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Nobody is quite sure how many are out here, there may be up to 100,000 in the Everglades,

  • they have no natural enemies, they are non-venomous, but they are constrictors,

  • and they`ve been seeing out here and caught out here up to nearly 20 feet.

  • And you can see behind me right now.

  • We`re at a University of Florida research facility.

  • The first snakes that were caught during the first day of the competition have been brought in.

  • They have seven of them total.

  • This one is about nine-ten feet, maybe, in length?

  • And Frank Mazzotti, wildlife ecologist, University of Florida is with me, and Frank,

  • you know, we were talking, this is not just about catching and killing snakes, is it?

  • PROF. FRANK MAZZOTTI, WILDLIFE ECOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA: That`s correct. In fact, for us, this event is really all about science.

  • And we`re going -- we take advantage of the python challenge to ask questions that we`ve not been able to do before.

  • This is going to give us our largest single one-time sample, most snakes over the biggest area that we`ve ever been able to collect.

  • And we`re going to be able to ask questions about contaminants,

  • things like mercury, genetics, can we identify new individuals from the core population?

  • Or diet, and help us address the very important questions about what impacts these species have on our native ecosystem.

  • ZARRELLA: In other words, what are the creatures-- ZARRELLA: ... eating.

  • MAZZOTTI: Because we will know what is inside of the critters.

  • ZARRELLA: Plus, you`re going to do necropsies, right, here on site. MAZZOTTI: We`re going to do necropsies, that`s correct.

  • And how big is this one, guys? You`ve got an ... UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: 287.5.

  • ZARRELLA: Which is? UNIDENTIFIED MALE: About nine feet.

  • ZARRELLA: Nine foot. That`s a pretty good size snake. UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That`s a pretty good size snake.

  • AZUZ: When you work in news, it`s a good idea to know when the camera is on.

  • Take this guy.

  • He`s making some touchups before he goes live, strengthening that tie, brushing off his jacket there.

  • There`s only one problem: he`s already live.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What?

  • AZUZ: The anchor in this next Youtube video is supposed to be on camera, not the student spot shotted (ph) behind her.

  • A valiant attempt to duck out of sight not fast enough.

  • Slip-ups can even happen here, at CNN.

  • ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: So, here at this point on the show,

  • we`re usually doing much different, much -- much -- much some different, much more different. What?

  • Oh, hey, sorry, I didn`t realize we were on the air.

  • AZUZ: Yeah, no, I`m ready to wrap this thing up, as soon as we finish this Cooper thing,

  • and somebody can help me think of a pun to go with -- wait -- what?

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: After years of accusations, a famous athlete is coming clean.

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