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  • Jonathan Hoefler: "Typefaces aren't merely about forms

  • they're about design systems. They have to do with the way things relate to one another."

  • Paula Scher: "It's the joy of what happens with color and form and information."

  • Eddie Opara: "Fonts are clothes in a sense. They help visualize and externalize your identity to the world."

  • "It's about tension, it's about special arrangement, it's about texture

  • it's about the dynamics."

  • Jonathan Hoefler: "Typefaces not toys.

  • They are tools, they're designed to solve problems.

  • Some people say there are two kinds of type designers: there are those whose voice is always detectable in the work that they do

  • and those whose voice is never detectable in the work that they do.

  • Tobias and I try to conceal our handiwork in typefaces. I would love people to recognize our work

  • to respond to it in an emotional way, but again for it to play second fiddle to the message.

  • Tobias Frere Jones: "A lot of the conversations that we have are bizarre.

  • We are trying to figure out what is the 'gray flannel suit' version of this form?"

  • Jonathan Hoefler: "This too Tom and Jerry. It needs to be more Don Draper."

  • Tobias Frere-Jones: "It is exactly what we are talking about. Oh you're right!"

  • Jonathan Hoefler: "Letters are everywhere.

  • and that's one of the things that makes typography so interesting to people these days."

  • Tobias Frere-Jones: "It is such a pervasive part of our day. You need type again and again and again. To get through your day. To live your life."

  • Paula Scher: "I landed in the music industry in the '70s. It was completely lucky. I loved record covers

  • The albums that people would know were things like

  • Bruce Springsteen 'Darkness on the Edge of Town'

  • or the Boston album.

  • but I was more interested in typography.

  • so

  • I used to experiment

  • with typography on jazz albums

  • I determine how I design something based on the audience and what the audience will bear.

  • Evoke the response you want while

  • pushing the audience to see something perhaps in a new way.

  • My goal, when I started designing for the public theater, was to create a

  • visual language as opposed to a logo for the theater.

  • And 'Bring in the da Noise, Bring in da Funk' is the best use of that visual language

  • because it used this wood type in a

  • very provocative way. It was type that talked to you, it was type that rapped, it was type that tapped.

  • It was the only Broadway show that didn't have a logo.

  • Everything is about identity.

  • Everything is about expressing individuality of places, businesses,

  • organizations, people. The ultimate goal is to have as much uniqueness and understanding

  • in every communication as you can have.

  • Eddie Opara: "Quite weirdly, I always think typography is a little bit like a carpet.

  • I kind of look at it from the point of view of texture and how readable that texture actually is.

  • One of our clients is Studio Museum of Harlem.

  • I had thought about 'Invisible Man.'

  • He talks about in a sense of identity as an African-American and being black um...

  • the idea of being noticed and unnoticed. What we did was create a form

  • similar to a stealth bomber

  • i took some text and applied it to a paper format utilizing optical illusion and

  • that's how stealth became whole.

  • It is not a normal poster which is flat. It is very sculptural.

  • UCLA came to me and asked us to look at their

  • poster series. We utilized a standard font, fedra, and manipulated it through code

  • into irregular

  • dynamic structures which were still fonts. You need attractors.

  • Too much text,

  • not enough

  • textual form or intention.

  • Dynamics. And so when you see a poster that is entirely different to other

  • posters you see around you then you're going to be attracted to it, whether

  • you hate it or you like it.

  • and that is basically doing its job."

  • Deroy Peraza: "If you look back two hundred years infographics being used to map cholera cases

  • in London. Fast forward and you have magazines like

  • Wired putting an emphasis on info graphics. Wired influences publications

  • like Good who take this online.

  • So the Opportunity Gap is a piece that we did for Good magazine.

  • It's really ultimately about education. It's about how poverty rates and access to health care

  • create a discrepancy in the opportunities available to students of different

  • races.

  • The most challenging part of organizing an infographic

  • is taking all of the available data

  • and deciding what is the most important bit of information that we need to communicate.

  • Infographics are just about the typography getting out of the way of the message."

  • Julia Vakser: "Our process is to be able to distill the information to a very key point.

  • We try to be as expressive as you can possibly be with the limitations we have."

  • Deroy Peraza: "Infographics are like hot science. It is fun and interesting. It is absporbing."

  • Paula Scher: "Because of the computer

  • people are really aware of typography like they've never been before."

  • Deroy Peraza: "Typography is kind of

  • finally free on the web."

  • Jonathan Hoefler: "It is amazing everybody can do this. The tools are there.

  • They are on your phone,

  • which is extraordinary."

  • Eddie Opara: "This is just something that should be enjoyed."

  • Paula Scher: "Words have meaning and type has spirit and the combination is spectacular."

Jonathan Hoefler: "Typefaces aren't merely about forms

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B1 typography jonathan tobias paula eddie poster

Typography | Off Book | PBS

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    sybil posted on 2013/06/01
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