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  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, and Fridays are awesome. Last time I'll say that on air for the 2015- 2016 school year.

  • Our daily show will pick back up again on Monday, August 15th. All right, let's get to today's current events.

  • First up, this morning, the Southern and Central parts of Texas were under a flash flood watch.

  • May was the wettest month in the US state history, but June hasn't brought any relief so far.

  • Rainfall of more than two inches per hour is in the forecast.

  • The governor has declared a state of emergency in 31 Texas counties,

  • and what that does is speed up assistance to the areas that need it most.

  • The ground is already saturated in many parts of the state,

  • so a forecast of more rain can only increase the threat of floods. For perspective, last month alone,

  • Texas got more than 35 trillion, that's trillion with a t, 35 trillion gallons of rain

  • that would have been enough to cover the entire state with almost eight inches of water,

  • though the rain was concentrated in specific areas. Where's it all going?

  • We've already seen the water come up. And actually, the Sheriff Office came by and said,

  • have you seen the water go down because we think we've crested. No, it hasn't crested yet.

  • It's still coming up. I'm gonna get out of the way here. You can see behind me, this is the river, river.

  • We should be talking about a river that's about 200- feet wide. It is well over a mile to the other side.

  • This is not a boat ramp,

  • this is an exit ramp from the turn around to go under the bridge and back up onto the highway,

  • the other direction.

  • People won't be driving on this for quite some time.

  • The rain continues in places that have seen now up to 20 inches of rain, just this month.

  • So, all of these dirt that I'm standing out of here, I'm over kind of on the side, over by a fire ant hill.

  • Fire ants aren't that happy about this rain neither. But all of this is completely soggy.

  • Nothing that rains today is gonna soak in. It's just gonna run back off.

  • This whole place is like a big concrete parking lot. When it rains, it runs off, and these rivers are still coming up.

  • They will be coming up still four days. This rain doesn't stop until Saturday afternoon, maybe Sunday.

  • We're watching upstream, because all that water has to run back down right here.

  • Some residents of the city of Fort McMurray, Canada, have begun returning home.

  • Last month, the massive wildfire forced the evacuation of 80, 000 people in the area.

  • Thousands of firefighters are still trying to get a handle on it,

  • though the blaze is no longer a threat to Fort McMurray.

  • The fire destroyed about ten percent of the city, at least 2400 buildings or homes.

  • Not everyone in Fort McMurray is allowed to come back yet.

  • Authorities say debris from the fire has to be removed before some homes can be occupied.

  • Many are still intact, but some residents don't know what they'll see.

  • From Canada, we're moving across the Atlantic to Switzerland, where the longest,

  • deepest tunnel in the world is now open. It's named the Gotthard Base Tunnel.

  • It's 35 miles long and runs underneath the Swiss Alps. In some places, it's one and a half miles deep.

  • And the trains that traverse it hit speeds of up to 155 miles per hour. Will it save time? Yes.

  • Officials say trains will be able to get from Zurich, Switzerland to Milan,

  • Italy about an hour faster on this route than trains on other routes. Will it help in other ways?

  • Yes, officials say freight will be moved more quickly, more efficiently, and more reliably.

  • What was the cost?

  • The tunnel took 17 years and $ 12 billion to built, about 2, 600 people worked on it along the way.

  • Thank you for all of your roll call submissions this school year. We received more than 100, 000 requests.

  • The last three schools we'll mention start with Avon Grove Charter School.

  • It's in West Grove, Pennsylvania, the home of the Wolves.

  • Moving west to Charlotte, Michigan, hello to the Orioles. Great to see everyone at Charlotte High School today.

  • And in Big Sky country, the community of Big Sky, Montana,

  • we totally dig the miners of Ophir Middle School.

  • There are a number of ways scientists can measure air quality.

  • Monitoring stations can keep track of the air in one specific place and detect any changes.

  • Trucks loaded with mobile instruments can be sent to different areas,

  • measuring carbon monoxide and ozone levels.

  • And satellites can track pollutants and how they move over a city.

  • There's another way to measure the quality of the air though by flying right through it.

  • 600 hours, NASA prepares to fly. A beautiful sunrise masked by a lingering haze,

  • one of the reasons this DC- 8 Jetliner is here in South Korea.

  • This flying laboratory will find out what pollutants are here, who's causing them,

  • and how they can be measured more accurately from space.

  • Eight hours flying the length and breadth of South Korea over cities, mountains,

  • and sea, collecting and analyzing data.

  • The equipment on this flight may be state of the art, but the plane itself isn't. It's almost half a century old.

  • It first flew back in 1969, I'm told, as part of the Alitalia fleet. But as you can see,

  • NASA has completely refitted it to suit its purposes.

  • 25 different instruments for measuring pollution and 34 scientists.

  • All of them excited to be part of this mission, a joint study with the South Korean Environment Agency.

  • Well, I don't think it's a discovery, but the air here is pretty dirty.

  • We kinda knew that.

  • South Korea has long blamed China for much of its pollution.

  • So- called yellow dust is known to blow in from deserts in Mongolia and Northern China,

  • picking up some pretty toxic hitchhikers along the way.

  • But fine dust particles, very detrimental to your health, may often originate closer to home.

  • The flight we're on today,

  • we've seen some of the largest pollution that we've seen the entire campaign,

  • and most of that is coming from local sources.

  • To capture some of this data, the plane has to fly low, involving skillful flying from former air force pilots,

  • and some deft negotiating with air traffic controllers, and a fair dose of turbulence.

  • It's not everyday you fly just a few hundred feet over the center of a 10- million strong metropolis.

  • South Korea ranked 173rd out of 180 countries in terms of air quality in a recent study by Yale University.

  • But this year's environmental performance index underlies the fact it is a global problem,

  • saying more than 3. 5 billion people, half of the world's population, live in nations with unsafe air quality.

  • As more than one scientist on board told me,

  • at least South Korea was acknowledging there's a problem and

  • opening up its air space to NASA and its expertise.

  • Paula Hancock, CNN, on board NASA's DC- 8 research jet over South Korea.

  • We're not gonna run away without a look at, let's call it, lighthearted news, or in this case, light- footed.

  • Check it out, y'all, a moose on the loose. This happened in Watertown, Massachusetts, earlier this week.

  • Not too common a sight in the neighborhood.

  • The wayward mammal didn't really hurt anyone or cause any mischief,

  • though it did lead police on a 45- minute chase.

  • Eventually, it moosied over into the woods.

  • It moosed have realized its moosetake and decided to hoof it. Maybe, it woodsn't having fun in the forest.

  • It wanted to stretch its mooseles or look for something more amoosing.

  • But straying into the suburbs probably wasn't the antler.

  • My name is Carl, and I'm Azuz on the loose.

  • We'll see you again on August 15th.

  • Please keep up with us over the summer on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

  • I'm @ CarlAzuzCNN.

  • And thanks to the millions of you who've watched worldwide in this extraordinary year

  • for CNN Student News.

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, and Fridays are awesome. Last time I'll say that on air for the 2015- 2016 school year.

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June 3, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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