Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • And lift off for the 500th time from Gagarin to start a rocket roaring into the air.

  • That rocket is a Russian Soyuz spacecraft

  • that launched from Kazakhstan yesterday.

  • It's headed to the International Space Station and carrying a bit of history.

  • The first ever astronaut from Denmark is aboard.

  • It'll take him, a Russian cosmonaut

  • and a Kazakh cosmonaut two days to reach the orbiter.

  • Well it's good to have you aboard

  • for this Thursday's edition of CNN Student News.

  • I'm your captain, Carl Azuz.

  • We're flying through ten minutes of commercial free current events.

  • Spinning the globe, it looks like President Obama

  • may have enough Senate votes to protect his controversial nuclear

  • deal with the Middle Eastern country of Iran.

  • We covered the details of the deal in our August 18th show.

  • Congress gets the final say on the US end of the deal

  • and it's likely that lawmakers,

  • virtually all Republicans and a few Democrats, will vote to reject it.

  • But President Obama has promised to veto that.

  • And it would require a two thirds vote

  • in both the House and the Senate to override that veto.

  • Yesterday, it appeared that enough Senators

  • had announced their support for the deal to prevent that possible override.

  • The Obama administration says this deal is the best way

  • to make sure Iran doesn't build a nuclear weapon.

  • Critics say it won't work,

  • that Iran will still be able to build one in the years ahead.

  • A CNN / ORC poll in mid- August found that 56 % of Americans

  • said Congress should reject the deal,

  • while 41 % said Congress should approve it.

  • From Oakers to Eagles, from the Ocean State to Oman,

  • it's time to take roll, starting in Coventry, Rhode Island.

  • That's where the Oakers are. Hello to everyone at Coventry High School.

  • In Brandon, Mississippi,

  • there's an educational center named Brandon Middle School.

  • It's where we found the Bulldogs today.

  • And in the capitol of Oman,

  • welcome to everyone watching

  • at the American International School of Muscat.

  • Great to see the Eagles.

  • Polio is a viral disease that mostly affects children under age five.

  • It's often associated with paralysis,

  • but that actually happens in less than 1 % of cases.

  • Most people who catch polio virus show no symptoms.

  • Those who do, often have flu like symptoms.

  • Since polio vaccines became widely available in the 1960s,

  • the disease has been wiped out from most of the world, not everywhere.

  • According to the World Health Organization,

  • Ukraine just saw an outbreak.

  • It's Europe's first outbreak in five years, and it's left two children paralyzed.

  • This particular outbreak started with the vaccine.

  • Doctors say, in rare cases,

  • the weakened virus in the vaccine can mutate and spread,

  • especially in areas where fewer people are already immunized.

  • Only half the children in Ukraine are fully immunized.

  • In one of the other countries where polio is still a threat,

  • people are making progress against it.

  • We're in northern Nigeria to document what was once thought impossible.

  • The potential end of polio here in Africa.

  • And here in remote Cono state,

  • that means vaccinating some 3 million children

  • in some of the world's hardest to reach areas.

  • We decided to go along for the ride.

  • In northern Nigeria most villages are off the grid, without healthcare.

  • Isolation that has enabled the wild polio virus or WPV to survive here,

  • decades after its eradication in most of the world.

  • This is also a region where insecurity thrives.

  • A more than five- year insurgency

  • by ISIS- aligned Boko Haram continues to have devastating consequences.

  • Better health care and better security are absolutely linked.

  • It is not surprising that the three countries on Earth

  • where we're still grappling with polio are those countries

  • who have had a lot of unrest.

  • Eradicating a disease. It's only ever happened once before.

  • That was in 1980 when smallpox was eliminated.

  • But with polio, it's within reach once again.

  • Since the global initiative began in 1988,

  • polio cases worldwide have been reduced by 99 %.

  • The remaining endemic countries,

  • conflict ridden Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

  • The last push will be a challenge.

  • When you come into these communities I mean,

  • how do they receive you? Do they welcome you?

  • Yes, for the hard to reach, we don't have a problem with that.

  • People actually welcome me because we have other interventions.

  • What are we looking at here? Now, this is actually a map for the last campaign.

  • Close to Kaija settlement, [ FOREIGN ] from the World Health Organization

  • shows me exactly what going door- to- door, house- to- house

  • in rural Nigeria really means.

  • So the check, that's a good thing.

  • It's a very good thing.

  • It means that all the children there received immunization.

  • With polio, is there gonna be a finish date.

  • You know all our indicators are showing us that we have covered grounds.

  • Then we can now say okay we have reached a certain point,

  • but we are not out of the woods.

  • How big a deal will that be though?

  • When that day happens how important will it be?

  • I think it's a celebration for the world. Everyone is going to celebrate.

  • Once you get Nigeria liberated from white poliovirus

  • and you have interrupted transmission, I think the whole of Africa.

  • You have achieved a very great feat for the whole of Africa.

  • And I think we'll be more warned.

  • Time for the Shoutout.

  • Which of these U. S. hiking trails is the longest,

  • spanning more than 2, 100 miles?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it the Appalachian Trail, Buckeye Trail,

  • California Coastal Trail, or Pacific Northwest Trail?

  • Of these trails, the Appalachian is longest,

  • passing through 14 states from Georgia to Maine.

  • That's your answer and that's your shout out.

  • The fact that it can take between five

  • and seven months to hike it entirely is the reason

  • why the Appalachian Trail is mostly used for short hikes.

  • But after a marine tank commander served

  • in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts,

  • he found that the Appalachian Trail gave him

  • and other veterans an opportunity to walk off the war.

  • Sean Gobin is today's character study.

  • You take back a lot of things from war

  • that you didn't think you would want to bring back.

  • I was just angry at everyone

  • and didn't want anything to do with anybody.

  • They can be kinda hard. You just get kind of anxious.

  • You stop feeling, basically.

  • All three of my combat deployments were really intense.

  • There was no time to cope.

  • I decided to hike the Appalachian Trail

  • because it had been a dream of mine growing up.

  • I saw it as a personal challenge.

  • But about two thirds of the way,

  • I realized I was processing all these experiences that I had put away,

  • and I knew that there were other combat veterans that needed to do that.

  • Hey we'll see you all in about six months.

  • The Warrior Hike provides veterans with all the equipment supplies

  • they need to complete a long distance hike.

  • I love you mommy. It's just like a deployment except

  • instead of going to fight a war your mission is to be a civilian again.

  • Just being in the woods out here there's nothing to do but think.

  • There's a internal quiet and some of the problems

  • that you're dealing with get hammered away.

  • Gorillas in the mist?

  • Just being around other military is worth more than words can say.

  • How many years you got in now?

  • Fifteen years. Our veterans also receive trail town support along the way.

  • Hello. Hi, how are you? Good, how are you?

  • You can see how much they care.

  • It helps. We help veterans prepare for the next chapter of their life.

  • We're learning to take it as it comes and move on.

  • Looking for that sense of calm,

  • and every step I take I think I'm going in that direction.

  • Before we go burpees for puppies.

  • Okay, first the burpee part.

  • This personal trainer shows what they are by doing them, a lot of them.

  • He was trying to set a Guinness World Record for the most burpee's in 24 hours.

  • The puppy part, he was doing it

  • to raise money for an animal protection agency in Northern Nevada.

  • The results part, Marshall Ruby bounced up more than 18, 000 times,

  • both setting the record and raising more than $ 4, 000

  • in donations for the lucky animals of the shelter.

  • Course, he was probably dog tired.

  • Might have wanted a serious cat nap.

  • Most would say doing that's for the birds

  • and it takes a chinchillot of effort though.

  • Afterward, you'd certainly feel like a beast.

  • I'm Carl Zeus for CNN Student News. See you Friday. Awesome!

And lift off for the 500th time from Gagarin to start a rocket roaring into the air.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

September 3, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

  • 4435 60
    VoiceTube posted on 2015/09/03
Video vocabulary