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  • This is CNN STUDENT NEWS. You give us 10 minutes.

  • We'll give you current events with zero commercials.

  • I'm Carl Azuz. We're starting today on the Korean Peninsula.

  • Even though an armistice ended fighting in the Korean War in 1953,

  • North and South Korea are still divided and they're still rivals.

  • The North is a communist dictatorship.

  • The South is a republic and an ally of the U.S.

  • That's why the world was concerned

  • when things got heated once again earlier this month.

  • Landmines badly wounded two South Korean soldiers

  • who were patrolling the demilitarized zone between the two countries.

  • North Korea denied laying them,

  • but South Korea responded by making propaganda broadcast across the border.

  • That infuriated the North. Troops were mobilized.

  • Talk of war was in the air.

  • But things settled down yesterday when the two sides reached an agreement.

  • North Korea said it regrets that South Korean soldiers

  • were injured by landmines,

  • and South Korea planned to stop its propaganda broadcast.

  • The DMZ is 160 miles long and it cuts through the Korean Peninsula.

  • And despite being called the demilitarized zone,

  • it's one of the most heavily guarded military barriers in the world.

  • About a million active duty troops to the North,

  • about 600,000 to the zone, and big reserves as well,

  • all on a footing for war really for the past 60 years,

  • in case there might an invasion from the other side.

  • Now, we've seen some new skirmishes

  • and the latest point of contention is this,

  • these high tech speakers that the South

  • is using to broadcast messages into the North.

  • How could this make such a difference?

  • Well, you have to consider the power of these speakers

  • and the nature of the messages.

  • These speakers, one unit, for example,

  • set in the mountains along the South here,

  • would have the capability of reaching by day,

  • about six miles into the North.

  • By night, about 12 miles in and the sound carries a little bit better.

  • The messages that have been sent recently have been

  • sharply critical of the Northern leadership,

  • sometimes they used defectors to the South to call out to their former countrymen.

  • And the North feels a little bit powerless to do anything

  • about this in terms of a quid pro quo,

  • because even though they have their own speaker systems,

  • theirs will only carry about a mile, and in some cases,

  • that will not even get them across the DMZ himself.

  • To the Middle Eastern country of Lebanon,

  • in the capital of Beirut, streets filled with garbage have become a battlefield.

  • Lebanon is a republic without a president.

  • Its parliament, which chooses the president, can't agree on one.

  • The government, like Lebanon's population,

  • is divided between Christian, Sunni Muslim,

  • and Shia Muslim leadership,

  • different government factions want different people to be president.

  • Parliaments been deadlocked for more than a year.

  • It also hasn't been able to deal with infrastructure problems,

  • accusations of corruption and garbage collection.

  • So, a protest over uncollected trash turned into an uprising over the weekend.

  • Hundreds of people and dozens of police were injured.

  • Demonstrators want to overthrow the government,

  • but the international doesn't want that to happen.

  • Lebanon seen as a relatively calm part of an unstable region

  • with Syria on its eastern border.

  • More than a million refugees from Syria civil war have fled to Lebanon.

  • And with Israel bordering to the south,

  • there are concerns about a possible conflict

  • between that country and the Lebanesemilitia it's fought with in the past.

  • Geography, history and folklore factor in our next story today.

  • It's set in the Owl Mountain there in southwest Poland.

  • This was Nazi controlled territory during World War II.

  • At that time, Nazi Germany was working on a project called Riese or giant.

  • It was this huge network of underground train tunnels in the region.

  • It was never finished, but there's a legend

  • that a Nazi train loaded with gold, art,

  • and jewels was hidden in the Owl Mountains and it could be armed.

  • Some say it's truth, some say it's myth, some say they found it.

  • In the shadow of 700 year old castle,

  • in a labyrinth of tunnels deep underground,

  • two treasure hunters in Poland say they've made a remarkable discovery,

  • a Nazi train loaded with up to 300 tons of treasure.

  • The district council has received a letter from a law firm in Wroclaw.

  • We were informed that the men, Poland German,

  • represented by a law firm, have discovered a German train.

  • The Nazi ghost train, a local legend,

  • reportedly lost in the final days of the Second World War.

  • 1945. Allied forces were closing in on Nazi held territory.

  • As the Germans fled, they loaded a train with stolen gold, gems and weapons.

  • It left Wroclaw, Poland, bound for Walbrzych,

  • through a series of tunnels built to secretly move Nazi goods.

  • It never reached its destination.

  • After the war, the tunnels were sealed and long forgotten.

  • The very existence of the ghost train remained a mystery.

  • No one has ever been able to confirm the existence of this train.

  • There are no documents about localization of it.

  • Polish authorities are taking the men's claim seriously saying,

  • "Lawyers, the army, the police and the fire brigade are dealing with this.

  • The area has never been excavated before

  • and we don't know what we might find."

  • The men have no plans to release their identities

  • or to reveal the location of the train

  • until they're guaranteed 10 percent of the value of whatever is found inside.

  • Local media recording that contents could be worth billions.

  • Wolf Blitzer, CNN, Washington.

  • CNN STUDENT NEWS Roll Call is taking us all over the world this year

  • and the first time ever, we're visiting Australia.

  • In the northeastern state of Queensland,

  • thank you for watching at the Chuwar Independent School.

  • It's in Chuwar. To the U.S. north, like way up north,

  • like north of the Arctic Circle north.

  • Kotzebue, Alaska, is home to the Huskies of Kotzebue Middle School.

  • And all the way across the country, in Yulee, Florida,

  • we've got the Hornets online today at Yulee High School.

  • A massive sell-off on the U.S. Stock Market yesterday.

  • After global markets took a hit, the Dow Jones Industrial Average,

  • an average of 30 significant U.S. stocks, closed down 588 points.

  • Not its worst day ever, but it's worst point drop since 2011.

  • After it opened Monday, the market freefell over a thousand points in 10 minutes.

  • It had never fallen that fast before.

  • It bounced up and down wildly after that.

  • Factors include China, oil,

  • subjects we covered in-depth on yesterday's show at CNNStudentNews.com.

  • Lori Weise says her organization's goal is to address the affects

  • that poverty has on pets.

  • She runs downtown dog rescue in Los Angeles.

  • Every year, it helps about 20,000 animals stay with their owners.

  • Her work for people and their furry friends

  • make it her today's character study.

  • I really believe most people want what is best for their pet.

  • Now, do they have the resources? No.

  • I just don't want to lose her. I got so attached.

  • So many times,

  • people just feel they have to surrender their animal when,

  • in reality, if they understood all the resources,

  • they are happy to keep their animal.

  • I'm going to make phone calls to see

  • if there's anybody who would be willing to foster.

  • I started a program that offers resources to low-income families

  • so they can keep their pets.

  • The areas where we tend to have the higher crime rates,

  • densely populated and there's lots of animals.

  • There is a lot of people that are either not employed,

  • they are underemployed,

  • but that does not mean that people don't love their animals.

  • Are you interested in a free neuter for him?

  • We offer free spay neuter, vaccines, dog food, medical services.

  • Oh, my God. Oh! There's mommy. Come here, Reno.

  • Our job is to find out, who is this person? How can we best help them?

  • It's crazy because I'm a foster child, and then you're fostering my dog.

  • We are offering them as much as we can to be successful with their pet.

  • This is a boy who loves to play.

  • It gives me a lot of joy to see the dogs with their family.

  • And he's so nervous about his dog dying. He thanked me five times.

  • Everybody in life needs to find their purpose and for me

  • it was really helping people with their animals.

  • Call it the Aurora Borealis, call it the northern lights,

  • most of those who've seen it would call it beautiful.

  • We're guessing Scott Kelly is with them.

  • But he has a bit of a different perspective.

  • He's aboard the International Space Station,

  • about 220 miles over our heads.

  • And he shot this time lapse of the Aurora Borealis just before sunrise.

  • From Earth's perspective, it gives a totally different view of Aurora,

  • and who'd say it wasn't the time or the space.

  • After all, it's just an astronaut expressing his views.

  • They're just reflected on a higher plane, y'all.

  • I'm Carl Azuz. I'm out of puns and I'm out of time. Come on back tomorrow.

This is CNN STUDENT NEWS. You give us 10 minutes.

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