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  • Fridays are what? Awesome.

  • Welcome to your April 17th edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • My name is Carl Azuz.

  • March 10, 2014, was the first time

  • we reported on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

  • It had vanished two days earlier in flight from Kuala Lumpur,

  • Malaysia to Beijing, China.

  • More than a year after that,

  • officials say they`ve covered the most of the priority search zone

  • in the Southern Indian Ocean.

  • Still no sign of the aircraft and its 239 passengers and crew.

  • Authorities say if they haven`t found anything by the time

  • they finish the current search area,

  • they`ll double it in size to an area bigger than the state

  • of Pennsylvania and keep on looking.

  • Government officials from Malaysia,

  • China and Australia say they`re committed to finding out

  • what happened to Flight 370 and bringing closure to the families

  • and loved ones of those aboard.

  • It was another week of good news/bad news for SpaceX,

  • a private space exploration company

  • that has a $1.6 billion contract from NASA.

  • The good news -- it got an unmanned spacecraft off the ground

  • and into orbit this week.

  • It`s headed for the International Space Station,

  • bringing along supplies, research equipment

  • and an espresso machine for astronauts.

  • SpaceX is trying to perfect a reusable rocket,

  • one that softly lands on a platform in the ocean

  • after getting the cargo ship into orbit.

  • The bad news -- it will have to keep trying.

  • The one that launched on Tuesday reportedly

  • made it to the platform but then tipped over and exploded.

  • A similar incident happened in January, but SpaceX isn`t giving up,

  • hoping one day to land rockets back on the ground

  • if they master landings at sea.

  • This month marks a couple of major events in U.S. Civil War history.

  • On April 9, 1965, Confederate General Robert E. Lee

  • surrendered his 28,000 remaining troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant.

  • It was the end of major hostilities in the War Between the States,

  • though some skirmishes

  • and additional Confederate surrenders continued afterward.

  • Five days after Lee`s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse on April 14,

  • 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

  • His legacy is still very much alive in America.

  • The bells of Washington, DC tolled to remember Lincoln.

  • It was 150 years ago

  • when this nation lost President Abraham Lincoln to an assassin`s bullet.

  • The man who held the Union together

  • and freed the slaves still captivates us.

  • Do you all have tickets?

  • His legacy drives sales -- books, movies.

  • And a government of the people, by the people, for the people.

  • Decades later, the silk has worn,

  • but his hat remains instantly recognizable

  • to thousands of tourists flocking here to buy tickets

  • to get a glimpse of where it all happened,

  • in Washington, DC`s Ford`s Theatre.

  • Most people don`t realize that it was John Wilkes Booth

  • and a handful of his colleagues and friends,

  • they were going to kill the vice -- the president,

  • he vice president and secretary of State and really this --

  • their concept was take down the entire Union government

  • and hopefully the South would rise again.

  • I had an ax put into my hands at once.

  • Today, Ford`s Theatre is equal parts playhouse, museum and shrine.

  • Paul Tetreault is the director and something of a historian.

  • We asked him how the assassin got so close to the president.

  • John Wilkes Booth was a famous actor of the time.

  • I mean I often tell people today, imagine, you know,

  • if Brad Pitt or Johnny Depp went after the president.

  • The president`s valet actually let Booth into the president`s box.

  • Booth squeezed the trigger on this single shot Derringer pistol

  • and shot Lincoln in the back of the head.

  • This was the bloody knife that he had cut Major Rathbone.

  • He held that up when he landed on stage and yelled,

  • "Sic semper tyrannis," which, of course,

  • is thus always to tyrants. That`s the actual knife.

  • Lincoln was taken across the street to The Petersen House.

  • He never regained consciousness.

  • Why does every presidential candidate running,

  • why does every president wrap themself in Abraham Lincoln?

  • Because he still matters.

  • Abraham Lincoln.

  • Abraham Lincoln.

  • Abraham Lincoln.

  • Land of Lincoln.

  • Everyone wants to follow in his footsteps.

  • Lincoln`s words and ideas and memory still hold

  • and form us and shape us and likely will for the next 150 years, as well.

  • Schools from China, California and Mississippi

  • are filling the Roll of today`s Roll Call.

  • First up, from Zhongshan Guangdong, China,

  • hello to everyone watching at Zhongshan Overseas Chinese Secondary School.

  • Across the Pacific, from Santa Rosa, California,

  • it`s The Falcons flying high over Rincon Valley Middle School.

  • And in the Southeast, from Byhalia, Mississippi,

  • we`re happy to see The Indians

  • from Byhalia Middle School are watching today.

  • You`re not going to be surprised by the headline,

  • "People Are More Connected Than Ever."

  • Take social media. What might surprise you

  • is that some doctors say we`re more lonely than ever.

  • And a recent study suggested that our interactions online,

  • our social media communications may be making us feel worse.

  • There is a simple step that can help with loneliness

  • for ourselves and for others. Just say hello.

  • For details on the campaign, we called the doctor.

  • Everyone gets lonely from time to time.

  • We`ve all had that experience.

  • But when -- when does become a medical condition?

  • What`s the danger of sustained loneliness?

  • What I found most remarkable is that loneliness can be physically painful.

  • The same parts of the brain that light up

  • when someone has physical pain are the same parts

  • that light up when someone is lonely.

  • So to say that loneliness hurts is a, you know,

  • I think it`s a real -- it`s -- it`s true. We can see it in the brain.

  • We can reach more people than ever on a computer, on a phone.

  • You have two million Twitter followers.

  • I have -- I have a few less than that.

  • But if we`re so connected, why

  • -- what`s the difference between saying hello

  • in person and saying hello online?

  • You know, one thing I -- I sort of realized

  • when I was researching this is that I don`t know

  • that we`re so much more connected.

  • I think we`re able to interact with j with people

  • that we don`t know sometimes, followers on social media,

  • all of that, better than ever before.

  • But that`s not the same as connection.

  • You know, physical human connection,

  • the way we human beings evolved, to be able to touch and

  • -- and feel and look someone in the eyes and -- and have that --

  • that experience is a different thing, I realized.

  • So you can have a lot of interaction and very little connection.

  • So you could have all these followers

  • and be out there on social media, but still be an incredibly lonely person.

  • So how does the Just Say Hello Campaign address that?

  • Well, we wanted to be very simple with this.

  • You know, the -- I think there`s so many times when,

  • you know, you want to say hello to somebody, but you just don`t.

  • You might even look at them in the eye for a second and look away.

  • And -- and the idea that if you just say hello to somebody,

  • you -- you`ve done a lot. You`ve made that person feel better.

  • But you`ve also made yourself feel better,

  • because by -- you`ve created a connection so it may --

  • it may address some of your own loneliness, as well,

  • just by simply doing this.

  • I think that`s it`s -- it`s -- it`s one of these things that if people did,

  • you`d start to reduce a lot of the -- the more broad feelings

  • and impact of loneliness in big, big chunks of our society.

  • What about Skype in classrooms?

  • There`s a Skype component to this?

  • There`s a Skype component, which was really interesting.

  • And I think the -- maybe one of the best uses of something like Skype.

  • And that is more of a mystery Skype.

  • So you Skype with other children or people around your own age who

  • -- who are in maybe different parts of the world,

  • different parts of the country, people you don`t know.

  • And all of a sudden, you get to meet somebody and have this

  • -- this conversation via Skype about things

  • and with people that maybe you never even dreamt of.

  • So it`s -- it`s really -- it`s -- it`s fascinating.

  • That -- that more --

  • that`s more of the sort of connection that I think we need.

  • Before we go, my producer had me at first donut in space.

  • What more do you need to know?

  • Well, for one thing, it`s a science experiment.

  • According to a Swedish news company,

  • two brothers attached a donut and a camera to a weather balloon.

  • Why? Because, first donut in space.