Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Hope your week is off to a good start.

  • First up today on CNN STUDENT NEWS, tragedy at sea.

  • Last week, hundreds of people boarded a boat

  • from Libya headed to Europe.

  • It sent out an SOS on Saturday night

  • and as a rescue ship approached, the migrants moved toward it,

  • crowding one side of their own boat,

  • causing it to capsize in frigid waters.

  • Italian Coast Guard officials say they've recovered some survivors,

  • but hundreds of people are feared dead.

  • These years, there`s been a series of disasters like this.

  • Thousands of migrants have been rescued.

  • Hundreds have died in dangerous Mediterranean crossings on unsafe ships.

  • Some are looking for a better life in Europe.

  • Some are running from violence and instability in countries like Libya.

  • Some are being trafficked as slaves.

  • European leaders are holding emergency meetings

  • and increasing the number of patrol ships to address the problem.

  • For millions of Americans, the middle of April is a time of remembrance,

  • reflection and recovery.

  • Last week marked the anniversaries of the Boston Marathon bombings

  • and a shooting at Virginia Tech University.

  • April 19th, 1993 was when the FBI led an assault

  • using tear gas on an armed religious cult in Waco, Texas.

  • It`s not clear exactly how a fire broke out in the compound

  • where the cult was gathered, but dozens of people died.

  • On April 19th, 1995,

  • a massive bombing occurred at Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building

  • in the Oklahoma capital.

  • The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum stands as a monument,

  • with 168 stone and glass chairs representing each victim.

  • And on April 20th, 1999, there was a shooting attack

  • at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.

  • The Columbine Memorial, opened in 2007,

  • pays tribute to the students and teacher who were killed.

  • April 20th is also the anniversary of a historic environmental disaster.

  • That massive oil slick now covering some 600 square miles

  • of the Gulf of Mexico and it could start

  • reaching the United States coast within hours.

  • Authorities knew it would take years to clean it all up.

  • Back in April of 2010,

  • the U.S. Coast Guard had estimated that 210,000 gallons of oil a day

  • were flooding out of the broken well into the Gulf of Mexico.

  • The final U.S. government report on the spill

  • put the blame on the BP Oil Company,

  • The Halliburton Oil Field Services Company

  • and The Transocean Offshore Drilling Company.

  • BP finally stopped the spill by putting an oil containment cap

  • on the leaking well and permanently sealing it off in early August of 2010,

  • more than two months after the deadly explosion.

  • You probably won`t see its effects on Gulf Coast vacation beaches,

  • but it`s still washing up in other places.

  • Barataria Bay, Louisiana,

  • the marshes and the shores of these small islands

  • were once covered in oil.

  • Today, from our boat,

  • we spot two dozen workers wearing face masks,

  • shoveling, working on a stretch of beach.

  • We pull up to take a look.

  • How you doing?

  • Doing good.

  • Drew Griffin with CNN.

  • Nice to meet you, sir. This is Philippe Cousteau.

  • How is it going?

  • We have to have you stay away

  • from the hazardous material at the moment,

  • because it is a clean up site.

  • The hazardous material turned out to be BP`s oil,

  • a 90 foot long, 30,000 pound tar mat.

  • We had a small tar ball tested and it matched the oil from the spill.

  • The fact is, five years later,

  • there is still oil -- oil in big enough clumps

  • that it needs to be dug up by a crew like this,

  • digging down 30 inches, trying to take it and remove it.

  • The pockets of tar mats that still exist

  • are in areas that are known to us,

  • but which were deemed by the federal government

  • to be better to leave alone there

  • and let them be naturally exposed to...

  • through erosion and then for us to clean them.

  • So as they appear, we are finding them and removing them.

  • But none of them poses a threat to human or aquatic life.

  • And is this going to go on for years and years?

  • However long it goes on, the company is committed to cleaning up

  • that which is exposed and that which is Macondo oil.

  • Time for the Shoutout.

  • American scientist William James

  • is known for his research into what subject?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it emotion, speech, reflex or biology?

  • You`ve got three seconds. Go.

  • The philosopher and psychologist William James

  • is known for his theories surrounding emotion.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • We`ve talked before how Internet companies

  • like Google and social media sites like Facebook

  • use the sites you visit and the subjects you like

  • to help advertisers reach you. It`s called data mining.

  • One thing that`s new, technology that allows some computers

  • to track your emotions while you`re online.

  • One thing that`s not new, the privacy concerns.

  • At Affectiva, we develop emotionally intelligent computers.

  • So we use technology that can track your facial expressions

  • and we map that into a number of emotional states.

  • Essentially what the computer is doing

  • is tracking your main feature points,

  • like your eyes, your mouth, your eyebrows.

  • So your technology, how can it know what I`m feeling?

  • What is it looking for?

  • We`ve amassed the world`s largest emotion data repository,

  • about seven billion emotion data points.

  • We`ve collected videos from over 75 countries of people

  • responding to digital content and we use that

  • to train the computer to detect all sorts of different expressions,

  • from enjoyment to confusion, concentration.

  • One of the things that`s scary

  • about this type of technology is you think,

  • wow, will a computer maybe

  • be reading my emotions without me knowing?

  • Do you think that`s possible for this technology one day?

  • Technologically, it`s possible,

  • but we have crafted all our user experiences to date

  • so that we get this opt in beforehand.

  • What are some ways

  • that you`re already implementing this technology?

  • So one of our main focuses at the moment is in the advertising

  • and media space.

  • We work with movie studios to develop and test their movie trailers.

  • Also, we work with about 1,400 brands

  • and advertisers who use our data

  • because they want to understand the emotional connection

  • you have with a brand.

  • And we help them optimize their advertising.

  • The site CNNStudentNews.com, the page, each day`s transcript.

  • The school`s on today`s roll, Osborn Middle School in the capital of Arizona.

  • That`s Phoenix, where The Fire Hawks

  • are watching in The Grand Canyon State.

  • Gillette is a city in Northeast Wyoming.

  • It`s where we heard from Campbell County High School.

  • Their mascot is The Camels.

  • And in The Bluegrass State,

  • we`ve got some Wildcats online in Louisville.

  • Hello to Farnsley Middle School in Kentucky.

  • Except for maybe considering whether to order the calamari,

  • most of us don`t think much about squid.

  • But scientists are finding uses for their proteins

  • that could shape the future gadgets we buy,

  • future technology in medicine and the future of camouflage.

  • Could one of nature`s masters of camouflage

  • help disguise soldiers in combat?

  • Findings from a recent research study from a team

  • of scientists at the University of California Irvine say

  • they`ve been able to isolate a key protein in squid skin,

  • which could one day help solids disguise themselves at night,

  • during combat, and effectively make them invisible from infrared detection.

  • The unique light reflecting protein is called reflectin.

  • Reflectin has enabled squid and other Cephalopods

  • such as octopus and cuttlefish to blend into their environments

  • for millions of years. Researchers say reflectin is super versatile

  • and with the right mechanical

  • or chemical stimulus can virtually be turned into any color.

  • Inspired, researchers found a way to produce reflectin in the lab

  • and create invisibility stickers.

  • These stickers are essentially tape coated with films of protein.

  • The lab technology is still a ways away from being used on the battlefield.

  • Still, don`t expect them to squid while they`re ahead.

  • Once researchers sushi potential,

  • the cephalapodsibilities are endless.

  • We`ve got to squiddadle, but come back Tuesday

  • for more deep sea in CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Hope your week is off to a good start.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Click the word to look it up Click the word to find further inforamtion about it

B1 US

April 20, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 5602