Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Yesterday was election day in Israel.

  • It`s a Middle Eastern nation of almost eight million people.

  • It`s only slightly larger than New Jersey,

  • but the vote was watched around the world.

  • This will determine the makeup of the Israeli parliament, called the Knesset.

  • That will determine who will be Israel`s prime minister.

  • It could impact the nation`s security, economy,

  • its relationships with other countries in the Middle East

  • and with Western nations, including the US.

  • CNN does not have any official estimates of the outcome,

  • but a major Israeli TV channel indicated that

  • Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu`s party

  • had a one seat lead over that of his main challenger, Isaac Hertzog.

  • While two other TV channels estimated their parties to be neck and neck.

  • Israelis don`t vote directly for their prime minister.

  • They choose the parties that ultimately determine the country`s leader.

  • You can find a full explainer on Israel`s Knesset

  • in Monday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, three nations in West Africa

  • that have been hardest hit with last year`s outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus.

  • Of the estimated 24,300 people who have caught it,

  • almost 10,000 have died.

  • The virus also threatens medical workers,

  • anyone who has been in contact with the body fluids of an Ebola victim.

  • An American health care worker who caught Ebola in Sierra Leone

  • is being treated at a National Institutes of Health facility in Maryland.

  • The patient is said to be in critical condition.

  • Several of the worker`s colleagues,

  • people who had contact with the sick person,

  • are now being monitored in the US.

  • They`re not sick, but they`ve likely been exposed.

  • It`s probably the question we got more than any other...

  • Is Ebola Airborne?

  • The answer is no, it`s not,

  • but today I want to take just a couple of minutes and show you why not.

  • I think you`re going to find this really interesting.

  • A lot of viruses, when they`re circulating through the air,

  • if you breathe them in, part of the reason they actually make you sick

  • because they stick to your airways.

  • Just imagine this is your airway, for example.

  • And this is one of those viruses.

  • Put that in there and pour it through, it`s actually staying.

  • Imagine that virus now staying in your lungs.

  • Ebola, though, doesn`t act that way.

  • It`s not as sticky.

  • So even if you were to breathe in an Ebola virus

  • -- it might look something like this

  • -- and put it through your airway here, watch what happens.

  • It goes right through. It doesn`t stick in your airway,

  • and that`s why it`s not airborne. It doesn`t make you sick.

  • There`s another reason Ebola isn`t airborne, either.

  • And I want to show you this.

  • When you think about cold viruses or flu viruses,

  • oftentimes they act a bit like a powder.

  • Think of that. If this powder is sort of in the air,

  • people can breathe it in,

  • but they can also live on surfaces for days, even weeks.

  • That`s, in part, what makes it airborne.

  • Instead, with Ebola, it`s much more like this baseball.

  • If you think about a baseball, you could put this in the air,

  • as well, but see what`s going to happen pretty quickly,

  • it`s just going to drop to the ground and it`s not going to get anybody sick.

  • Iraq`s history doesn`t just go back centuries,

  • it goes back millennia.

  • Historians consider Mesopotamia,

  • which stretched over most of modern-day Iraq,

  • to be the cradle of civilization.

  • But some of the artifacts and ruins that remain have a new enemy

  • -- the ISIS terrorist group.

  • It`s bulldozing or dynamiting churches,

  • relics, shrines and mosques.

  • Thousands of years of history wiped out in minutes.

  • Videos of ISIS destroying ancient artifacts

  • have sent shockwaves throughout the world.

  • But just why are they doing it?

  • From the Mosul Museum to the ancient Assyrian site of Nimrud,

  • nothing is off limits.

  • ISIS militants have destroyed unique statues

  • and artifacts documenting the very history of human civilization.

  • Their value beyond estimate.

  • ISIS says God ordered them destroyed

  • because people in the past worshipped these objects instead of God,

  • including the famous winged bulls of Nineveh, dating back to 900 BC.

  • It`s about eradicating a country`s, indeed,

  • an entire region`s, cultural heritage, its past,

  • and perhaps ruining whatever hope people still have in the future.

  • ISIS are attacking anything

  • that`s either pre-Islamic or conflicts with their beliefs.

  • UNESCO has accused them of trying to erase world history.

  • Of course, many of the objects from the Mosul Museum

  • have already been sold on the black market for antiquities,

  • a market now flooded with loot as never before.

  • After the upheavals in Libya, Egypt,

  • Syria and Yemen and war here in Iraq,

  • government order has broken down in many areas

  • and it`s a free-for-all,

  • whether it`s ISIS or simply ordinary people desperate to make a living.

  • Roll Call -- we're announcing requests from cnnstudentnews.com

  • three schools at a time.

  • Mexico is first up today.

  • Hello to our viewers at the Institute of Thomas Jefferson.

  • It`s in Queretaro.

  • Texas is The Lone Star State and The Chargers are electrifying.

  • They`re at Boerne Middle School South in Boerne.

  • And from The Silver State,

  • it`s The Warriors of Western High School

  • rounding out our Roll from Las Vegas, Nevada.

  • Football players at all levels would say

  • linebacker Chris Borland was living the dream.

  • He`s 24 years old, had a great rookie season with the San Francisco 49ers,

  • signed a $3 million contract with a $600,000 bonus and walked away.

  • Borland said that after speaking with concussion researchers,

  • current and former players and studying the relationship

  • between football and neurodegenerative disease,

  • playing isn`t worth the risk to his health.

  • Some retired NFL players who had suffered concussions

  • have developed memory problems,

  • Alzheimer`s Disease, depression or worsening brain disease.

  • In a class action lawsuit settled last year,

  • the NFL agreed to compensate former players

  • and their families for concussion injuries

  • and to cover the cost of medical exams and medical research.

  • Borland said he`d had two diagnosed concussions

  • one from middle school soccer and one from high school football,

  • but that he didn`t want to risk any more in the NFL.

  • The League responded,

  • "We respect Chris Borland`s decision and wish him all the best.

  • Playing any sport is a personal decision.

  • By any measure, football has never been safer

  • and we continue to make progress with rule changes,

  • safer tackling techniques at all levels of football

  • and better equipment, protocols and medical care for players.

  • Next story, they make some folks feel safer knowing

  • that potential criminals are on camera.

  • They make some folks uneasy,

  • as if Big Brother is watching everything they do.

  • Officials say surveillance cameras are a mixed blessing.

  • They record loads of footage which can be tedious to review,

  • but they helped identify the alleged Boston Marathon bomber,

  • who`s now on trial.

  • Two things we can say for sure --

  • they`re not going away and they`re constantly shifting shapes.

  • This ball, it`s no toy. It`s a robot spy.

  • They call it the GuardBot and it`s currently being tested by the U.S. military.

  • Round, remote-controlled and silent,

  • GuardBot is billed as the only known spherical surveillance vehicle

  • that can swim upstream.

  • It runs on a battery powered pendulum that swings back and forth,

  • forcing the ball to roll about three to six miles an hour.

  • They can be remote-controlled via satellite from anywhere in the world.

  • Invented by GuardBot Inc. in Connecticut,

  • a basic model could go for $100,000.

  • The demonstration model is two feet wide,

  • but they`re scalable.

  • In fact, the company says

  • the U.S. Army is interested in a tiny five inch version.

  • Cameras on each side act as GuardBot`s eyes.

  • They also can be outfitted to detect explosives.

  • New York City police have expressed interest in using it

  • to prevent attacks like the deadly 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

  • If GuardBot pans out,

  • the robotic shape of things to come may be round.

  • It`s a new world record for an event you probably didn`t know existed

  • -- highest recorded bird flight from a manmade structure,

  • in this case, the bird is Darshan the eagle.

  • The structure is the Burj Khalifa, the world`s tallest building.

  • And the recorder was a camera fastened to the eagle`s back.

  • The animal was released from more than 2,700 feet over Dubai.

  • Not much flapping necessary.

  • Darshan seems to effortlessly glide down toward his trainer,

  • who`s waiting on the ground and signaling to the bird.

  • It`s incredible to watch.

  • But besides the record, why do this?

  • Darshan`s fantastic flight was designed to raise awareness

  • about endangered species and encourage conservation.

  • So you can`t just call it a flight of fancy,

  • though you could say it`s for the birds.

  • And if you think there`s no talon how the animal found his trainer,

  • remember, he`s got eagle eyes.

  • While just saying these puns leaves me feeling pretty sore,

  • I`m glide to share them with you.

  • CNN STUDENT NEWS returns tomorrow.

Yesterday was election day in Israel.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

March 18, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 6730 225
    VoiceTube posted on 2015/03/18
Video vocabulary