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  • Wherever you`re watching today,

  • thank you for taking 10 minutes for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • We`re covering stories from around the world today, from Europe to the Middle East to Asia.

  • We`re starting in Italy, where two American tourists were recently arrested.

  • They were in the Italian capital of Rome visiting the Coliseum.

  • The world-renowned landmark dates back to the year 70, when construction started.

  • Today, there`s a law against defacing the roman amphitheater.

  • The two American women, both from California and in their 20s, are accused of scratching their initials into one of the Coliseum`s walls

  • and then taking a selfie of it.

  • They could be fined for aggravated damage on a building of historic interest.

  • Last year, there were five tourists caught carving graffiti on the Coliseum.

  • One of them, who shaped the letter K in the brick work, was fined more than $21,000.

  • From Italy, we`re taking off toward the Middle East.

  • The United Arab Emirates forms the southern border of the Persian Gulf.

  • It`s from there that two pilots are attempting to fly into history.

  • In fact, they have already finished the first segment of their flight,

  • from the United Arab Emirates to neighborhood Oman.

  • The U.S. Army air services first flew around the globe in 1924,

  • but this flight is powered by the sun.

  • And while it could be early August before it returns to Abu Dhabi,

  • the excitement about their departure on Monday still hangs in the air.

  • The final touches to a world first -- a solar plane getting ready to fly into history.

  • We`re in the early hours of the morning here and this aircraft, the Solar Impulse 2, is being pushed out onto the tarmac,

  • ready to embark on its ambitious around the world journey powered purely by nature.

  • But once out on the runway, delays.

  • Technical problems and poor visibility mean the plane, with more than 17,000 solar cells built into its wings, has to sit idle. Then after an hour, the all clear.

  • Twelve years of hard work come down to this single moment.

  • Then takeoff without using a single drop of fuel.

  • But this is not flight of fancy.

  • The pilots believe this is the future of aviation.

  • And ahead of the big day, their anticipation was soaring.

  • Nobody has done it before and we don`t know exactly if it`s possible or not, honestly.

  • We have to try it. Like every new thing in history,

  • you have to try it.

  • And history should be made in just a few months,

  • when they`re set to land back in the UAE capital.

  • But how does it all work?

  • This wing is the largest that you can find.

  • I mean it`s bigger than the wing of a 747.

  • So it -- we are propelled by electric motors,

  • so we have four gondolas.

  • And in each, we have a motor and we have a set of batteries which will help us to fly through the night.

  • And, of course, on top of this wing, we have solar cells.

  • And that`s the source of energy.

  • For Swiss co-pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg,

  • the journey will undoubtedly be a record breaking show of technology and invention.

  • They`ll share grueling shifts in a tiny cockpit with few comforts,

  • making the attempt a mental challenge, too.

  • The entertainment in that cockpit is the beauty of the world

  • when you fly with no fuel, no pollution, no noise and you just feel the privilege you have to fly the most extraordinary airplane in the world.

  • The 35,000 kilometer trip will take place over 12 stages,

  • bunny hopping from cities like Nanjing in China to Phoenix, Arizona.

  • And until its return back here, the Solar Impulse team will be hoping that the sun just keeps on shining.

  • Amir Daftari, CNN, Abu Dhabi.

  • Time for the Shoutout.

  • Which of these places is largest?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it Siberia, Sahara Desert, Amazon Rainforest or Australia?

  • You`ve got three seconds. Go.

  • The total area of Siberia is 5.2 million square miles, making it, by far, the largest region on this list.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • All right, put another way, if you can find Northern Asia on a map, you`ve found Siberia.

  • It makes up almost 10 percent of the world`s land surface.

  • But fewer than 40 million people live there.

  • That`s smaller than the population of Argentina.

  • And Siberia`s ferocious winters help explain that.

  • One thing that can`t be explained yet is a natural phenomenon appearing in parts of Siberia.

  • A mystery at the end of the Earth --

  • giant gaping holes in the ground appearing out of nowhere.

  • It`s happening in one of the most remote spots on the planet,

  • in far Northern Russia, Siberia`s Yamal Peninsula.

  • Translated, that`s literally the end of the world.

  • The first crater appeared last summer.

  • Then came several more. Scientists were baffled.

  • I`ve never seen such craters anywhere in Yamal where I`ve been,

  • and I`ve never heard my colleagues talk of anything similar.

  • Now they count at least seven large craters, some of them up to 100 meters across.

  • Two have turned into lakes and one is just a few kilometers away from a major Gazprom natural gas field.

  • Professor Vasily Bogoyavlensky and a team of experts have made several expeditions to Siberia,

  • taking samples, gathering evidence,

  • even braving sub-zero cold to climb down inside one of the deepest craters for a closer look.

  • He suspects there are dozens more in the region

  • and says they pose a serious threat.

  • Yes, it`s very serious.

  • And if such craters will take place in the industrial region, it could be a quite serious disaster.

  • So what`s behind them?

  • Early speculation ran wild, from meteorites and stray missiles to even UFOs and aliens.

  • Bogoyavlensky believes a more plausible theory is that the release of methane gas is sparking underground explosions,

  • leaving behind the massive craters.

  • But that still does not solve the mystery.

  • We don`t know exactly from where this gas came.

  • Some experts say global warming may be causing Siberia`s ice to melt,

  • releasing the dangerous methane blasts.

  • While scientists continue to debate and investigate,

  • for now, the mystery only deepens.

  • Linda Kinkade, CNN.

  • Today`s Roll Call ranges from the least populated U.S. state to the Middle Eastern nation of Kuwait.

  • We`ll start in Wyoming, The Cowboy State.

  • In the city of Evanston,

  • hello to the Red Devils of Evanston High School.

  • Rhode Island is The Ocean State.

  • Is it Providence that Providence is on today?

  • At Mount Pleasant High School The Kilties are watching.

  • And in the northwest Persian Gulf,

  • The Eagles are online at Universal American School.

  • It`s in Khalidiya, Kuwait.

  • It`s always snowy in the Himalayas.

  • Parts of the Asian mountain chain never see a day without it.

  • It`s easy to find pictures of these majestic mountains looking up.

  • One group recently got footage from as high as 24,000 feet.

  • They used a helicopter, a gyro-stabilized camera system and supplemental oxygen.

  • The resulting views are a breath of fresh air.

  • The Himalayas Republican 20,000 feet

  • The Himalayas contain more than 110 peaks over 24,000 feet

  • They span 1,500 miles and 6 countries

  • They are one of the youngest mountain ranges on the planet

  • They formed 40 to 60 million years ago when India collided with Asia

  • Mount Everest is 29,029 feet tall

  • The Himalayas continue to rise more than 1 centimeter a year

  • The range contains the largest concentration of ice outside the poles

  • It`s like a tourism commercial with great altitude,

  • Everesting views, iridescent angles, valleys to pique your interest.

  • It`s downright beautiful, to put it in Himalayman`s terms.

  • I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Wherever you`re watching today,

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CNN Student News March 10, 2015

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