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  • How to Learn Languages by Binge-Watching Streaming TV.

  • Due to the 2020 health crisis, streaming services like Netflix have seen an increase in watch

  • time between 20% and 50% during the confinement.

  • I'm no different, I've spent way more time watching TV than I'd like to admit.

  • But in the process, I've actually managed to improve my German skills drastically.

  • Streaming television has been a game-changer for language learning in the past few years.

  • It's likely the best way to immerse yourself in a new language from home.

  • But it has to be done in a productive way.

  • I thought it would be very helpful to show you how you can use streaming services to

  • really improve your skills in a new language.

  • In the first half of this video, we'll talk about the best streaming services for language

  • learning and we'll show you how to find TV shows and movies in different languages.

  • In the second half of this video, we'll show you how to watch in a way that's effective

  • for language learning.

  • Let's get started.

  • Part 1 - The Best Streaming Services for Language Learning.

  • Netflix We'll start with the most popular streaming

  • service in most parts of the world.

  • It is estimated that nearly 60% of American households have access to a Netflix subscription.

  • The actual number is not known because of account sharing, but it's fair to say that

  • this can help a lot of people.

  • Netflix makes it really easy to find TV shows and movies in your target language.

  • All you have to do is go to:

  • netflix.com/browse/audio

  • Choose your language in the drop-down menu, and you will see all the TV shows and movies

  • available in that language.

  • This method will show you everything, dubbed content and material originally recorded in

  • that language.

  • If you would like to find only material that was originally made in that language, you

  • can simply type the language in the search box.

  • If you typeGerman”, you will see many TV shows and movies that were originally recorded

  • in German.

  • Prime Video Next, we'll take a look at Amazon's streaming

  • service.

  • Prime is wonderful for dubbed content and kids shows.

  • Children shows are often much easier to understand than material meant for an older audience.

  • Most of the movies and TV shows on Prime Video are available in multiple languages.

  • Simply type in your language in the search box, and you will see everything that is available

  • to you, dubbed or original.

  • It's that simple.

  • Apple TV The streaming service by Apple has a limited

  • quantity of titles available, but for language-learning purposes, they are great.

  • Although the quantity is limited at the time of making this video, ALL their titles are

  • dubbed in multiple languages.

  • Plus, you can choose the region of the dubbed version.

  • So, if you are learning Spanish, you can choose between the Latin American and Spain versions.

  • If you're learning French, you can choose France or Canada.

  • This will help you get used to the accent that you prioritize learning.

  • Apple TV also has the greatest number of subtitle languages I have seen on any streaming service.

  • If you are learning a language that's a bit less common, there's a good chance that Apple

  • TV has at least the subtitles in that language.

  • Disney+ Disney movies are absolutely amazing for language

  • learning.

  • They are made for a younger audience so they are usually easier to understand, but they

  • are entertaining for adults as well.

  • I never get bored watching the Lion King or Toy Story.

  • Content-wise, it is my favourite service.

  • Although I absolutely love Disney movies, I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with

  • Disney's new streaming service from a language-learning standpoint.

  • The content is amazing, but the platform makes it challenging to find material in your target

  • language.

  • First, we'll look at the easy part.

  • All Disney+ originals are available in multiple languages.

  • So if you click on Originals, there is a very good chance that your target language will

  • be included.

  • For the rest of the library, it's a bit harder to find.

  • Most of their titles are available in multiple languages, and they keep adding languages

  • over time, but it's completely random.

  • For example, the original Toy Story is available in 6 languages, but Toy Story 4 is available

  • in English and Spanish only.

  • Also, you can't search for a language in the search box.

  • You have to click play, go to the language settings, and only then will you see if the

  • language is available.

  • Now, if you're learning Spanish, most of the titles will be available to you.

  • But if you're learning another language, it can be a bit frustrating at times to have

  • to open the title every time.

  • But Disney movies are so useful for language learning that we could not leave it out of

  • this video.

  • Plus, the Disney platform is quite new, so I'm sure they will improve this over time.

  • Now that you know how to find material using streaming services, let's talk about making

  • it really effective for you.

  • Part 2 - How to Make Watching TV Really Effective for Language Learning: Comprehensible Input

  • First, there's a very important concept you need to understand.

  • It's a theory we often discuss on this channel.

  • I'm talking about thecomprehensible inputhypothesis put forth by Linguist Stephen Krashen.

  • Dr. Krashen has dedicated his entire career to the field of second-language acquisition.

  • In my opinion, he's an absolute genius.

  • Comprehensible input simply means that in order to learn from the material, you need

  • to understand the general message.

  • In order to learn words from context, you must be able to make deductions from the parts

  • of the sentence you do understand.

  • If you don't understand anything at all, you won't learn much.

  • So, how do we make things comprehensible when learning a new language?

  • Well, that really depends on the languages you already speak and the one you're learning.

  • If you speak Spanish and want to learn Italian, finding material that's partly comprehensible

  • should be relatively easy.

  • Both languages are similar enough that you should be able to make out the general message

  • as a beginner.

  • But if you are learning languages that are more distant, comprehensible material will

  • be next to impossible to find as a complete beginner.

  • Here are 3 ways to make movies and TV shows more comprehensible.

  • #1: Learning Through Other Means First.

  • This may sound obvious, but you may have to learn a bit of the language in other ways

  • before watching TV can be really effective for language learning.

  • Learning some common words, vocabulary, and grammar can be done rather quickly and it

  • can really skyrocket your results from watching TV.

  • Learning just few hundred words, if you learn the right ones, can already make a huge difference

  • to your overall comprehension.

  • Once you have built enough knowledge, finding material that is comprehensible enough to

  • learn from it becomes much easier.

  • Eventually, everything will be comprehensible and you'll be able to continue learning from

  • activities you truly enjoy, like binge-watching a Netflix show.

  • #2: Watch Things AgainBut This Time Dubbed.

  • This method is a goldmine for people who love to watch movies and TV shows multiple times.

  • It's really simple, you watch a TV series or movie that you have already seen in English,

  • but this time, you watch it dubbed in your target language.

  • This will make comprehension a lot easier because you already know what's going on.

  • You'll be able to keep up with the storyline and make deductions on what the words mean.

  • If you have a TV series you've seen many times, well, it's time to watch it again!

  • But this time, you'll be learning a new language.

  • #3: Watch Children Shows.

  • TV shows that were made for a younger audience are amazing for language learning.

  • They were actually created for children who are in the process of learning their first

  • language.

  • They often speak slowly, enunciate really well and use simple vocabulary.

  • This makes it much easier to understand.

  • Most of the streaming services have a “kidsorchildrencategory, so finding these

  • shows should be a breeze.

  • The younger the target audience of the show, the easier it will be for you to understand.

  • Do not underestimate this.

  • If you think about it, children at 7-8 years old are already amazingly skilled at their

  • language.

  • In the beginning, watching a show like Caillou (Prime video) or Peppa Pig (Netflix) is a

  • better idea than watching a Disney movie like Aladdin, even if it seems really silly to

  • be watching these types of shows as an adult.

  • Should You Use Subtitles?

  • This is a question we get very often.

  • Subtitles can be helpful in making things more comprehensible, so they must be good

  • in helping us learn effectively, right?

  • Well, not necessarily.

  • In our experience, subtitles often cause more problems than they solve.

  • Don't: Use English subtitles.

  • If you use English subtitles, you'll likely just read the subtitles and not even listen

  • to the foreign language anymore.

  • English subtitles are only effective if you use them to understand the scene, but then

  • watch the scene again after turning them off.

  • Don't: Use subtitles that don't match.

  • Subtitles in the language you are learning are really effective, but only if you can

  • find subtitles that match what is being said on the screen.

  • That's likely the biggest disappointment of streaming services for me.

  • Most of the time, the subtitles for dubbed movies and TV shows won't match the audio.

  • The meaning is roughly the same, but the wording is different.

  • This is really confusing for the learning brain.

  • Do: Use Closed Captioning when you can.

  • Subtitles will only truly match with TV shows that were originally filmed in the language

  • you are learning.

  • It needs to be closed captioning or CC for short.

  • If you are able to find CC subtitles, it will match the audio perfectly.

  • This can be really helpful.

  • Reading and listening at the same time is a really good language-learning exercise.

  • There you have it!

  • If you're interested in learning language with movies, but don't have quite the ability

  • to do so yet.

  • We have an amazing language-learning method that will teach you everything you need to

  • build that solid foundation and make learning with movies much easier.

  • You should check out our website.

  • You can find us at Ouino.com.

  • That's O,U,I,N,O dot com.