Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Prince Harry reveals royal secrets in new book.

  • This is News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. And I'm Sian. Make sure you watch to the end

  • to learn vocabulary about this story.

  • And don't forget to subscribe to our channel, like this video

  • and try the quiz on our website.

  • Now the story.

  • Prince Harry's autobiography,

  • Spare, has finally gone on sale.

  • He writes about his struggles growing up as a member of the Royal Family

  • Harry describes dealing with his mother's death,

  • his anger with the media and the treatment of his wife, Meghan.

  • The Royal Family have said they will not comment.

  • You've been looking at the headlines, Sian. What's the vocabulary?

  • OK. So, we have 'from the horse's mouth', 'flood' and 'have their cake and eat it'.

  • This is News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • Let's have a look at our first headline.

  • This one is from The Standard. Harry's memoir

  • Spare hits bookshelves at midnight

  • as fans queue to read duke's story from horse's mouth.

  • Yes. So, Harry's book has come out and people want to hear his story.

  • They want to hear it 'from the horse's mouth'

  • and that is the idiom that we are looking at.

  • It's got a horse. It's got a mouth.

  • Yeah, but it's an idiom,

  • so there are no actual horses or mouths involved.

  • So, if you hear something directly from the horse's mouth,

  • it means you hear it from the original sourceso, in this case, from Prince Harry.

  • Yeah. So, it's saying that fans are waiting in these bookshops

  • to hear this story told by Harry himselfit's from the horse's mouth.

  • It's from the original source.

  • Yes, exactly. And we often see this expression written in the news

  • to talk about celebrities, often gossip about them.

  • Yeah. Because often what we read

  • or hear about famous people, celebrities, is just gossip.

  • It's what one person thinks. But if they give an interview or write a book,

  • that is from the original sourcethe horse's mouth.

  • We often use this in, well, we also use it

  • in everyday conversation as well, don't we?

  • Yes. So, for example, there could be a rumour at your place of work,

  • maybe someone's pregnant,

  • maybe somebody is leaving

  • and then that person tells you directly

  • you hear it directly or straight from the horse's mouth.

  • Yes. And we often use things like 'straight from' or 'directly

  • from' just to emphasise that it comes directly from the original source.

  • OK, let's look at that again.

  • Let's have a look at our next headline.

  • And this is from The Telegraph. Readers flood bookshops

  • in midnight rush to purchase

  • Prince Harry's Spare.

  • Yes. So, the headline is saying that readers flooded bookshops. Now,

  • I thought 'flood' meant too much water? Yeah, normally, it does.

  • But this is actually quite a useful way to think about it.

  • So, if lots of water enters a building

  • in an uncontrolled way, we can say it floods the building.

  • But, imagine instead of water, it's people.

  • So, if lots of people enter a building,

  • we can say they flood it.

  • So, it means that the bookshops are so full because there are people,

  • lots of people, who want to buy and read this book.

  • Yeah. And even though we use

  • 'floods' normally with water,

  • we can also use it with other words like 'people',

  • we just saw. Or 'sunlight' or 'complaints'.

  • Yes. Light can flood a room

  • and it means that the room is filled with light.

  • Yeah. And if 'complaints flood in', that means

  • you suddenly receive lots and lots of complaints.

  • Yes. Let's hope that complaints

  • don't flood in about us

  • and that you write loads of nice stuff. Yeah, that would be better.

  • Let's have a look at that again.

  • Let's have a look at our next headline.

  • This is from The Guardian.

  • Prince Harry book leaks

  • let papers have their cake and eat it.

  • Yes. So, before the official release of this book,

  • somebody leaked it.

  • It means that they published it before they were supposed to.

  • We are looking at the expression

  • 'have your cake and eat it', which is another idiom.

  • It's got cake, I love cake.

  • Yeah, but unfortunately, it's an idiom,

  • so it's not actually about cake.

  • So, if you want to have your cake and eat it,

  • you want to gain two advantages from one thing, but it's not possible.

  • You have to choose.

  • Yes, but luckily for the newspapers,

  • they could 'have their cake and eat it'

  • this time because, firstly, they got to write about Harry

  • and secondly, they got to criticise him. Yes, but,

  • but pay attention because normally we use this phrase in a negative sense.

  • We say 'you can't have your cake and eat it' because it's impossible.

  • If you have a cake,

  • you can't keep the cake and also eat it

  • it's just not possible.

  • And, so, if I want to save money and at the same time buy something expensive...

  • You can't do it! You can't have your cake and eat it!

  • Exactly. I can't have my car and my money.

  • Let's have a look at that again.

  • We've had 'from the horse's mouth' –

  • directly from the source.

  • 'flood' – enter in large amounts.  

  • 'have their cake and eat it' – try to gain two advantages from one thing.

  • And don't forget there's a quiz on our website at

  • BBCLearningEnglish.com. Thank you for joining us

  • and goodbye. Goodbye.

Prince Harry reveals royal secrets in new book.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Click the word to look it up Click the word to find further inforamtion about it