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  • (wind whistling)

  • (gentle calm music)

  • - Dead.

  • - [Narrator] Marley was dead, as dead as a doornail.

  • Scrooge knew he was dead. Of course he did.

  • How could it be otherwise?

  • Scrooge and he had been partners

  • for I don't know how many years.

  • Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator,

  • his sole friend, and the only man who mourned him.

  • If Scrooge can be said to have mourned at all.

  • And the mention of Marley's funeral brings me back

  • to the point I started from.

  • There is no doubt that Marley was dead.

  • This must be distinctly understood or nothing wonderful

  • can come from the story I am going to relate.

  • So now it begins.

  • (bright lively music)

  • (bright lively music continues)

  • (bright lively music continues)

  • (gentle peaceful music)

  • It was bitterly cold on the night of Christmas Eve of 1843

  • when Scrooge sat busy in his counting house counting his money

  • with his clerk nearby trying to warm himself at the candle,

  • but since he didn't have much of an imagination, he failed.

  • (gentle peaceful music continues)

  • (bell rings)

  • - A Merry Christmas, Uncle. God save you.

  • - What?

  • - I said Merry Christmas.

  • (footsteps)

  • - [Scrooge] Bah humbug.

  • - Christmas humbug? Uncle, you surely don't mean that.

  • - Of course I mean it. Merry Christmas indeed.

  • What reason do you have to be merry?

  • You're poor enough.

  • - Come now, Uncle. What reason do you have to be dismal?

  • You're rich enough. (chuckles)

  • - Bah. Away with Christmas.

  • What's Christmas to you but a time of paying bills

  • without money, a time of finding yourself a year older

  • and not an hour richer?

  • If I could work my will,

  • every idiot that goes about with Merry Christmas on his lips

  • should be boiled in oil and buried with a stake

  • of holly through his heart, he should.

  • - Uncle!

  • - Nephew, you keep Christmas in your way

  • and I'll keep it in mine.

  • - Keep it? But you don't keep it.

  • - Let me live it alone, then.

  • A lot of good it has done you.

  • - Well, there's not many things from which I have benefited,

  • but I dare say, Uncle, that it's a time to share Christ

  • and for people to be able to come into the knowledge

  • of knowing that, that we have a Savior

  • and that He can save us from our sins at this time or,

  • or even throughout the year, it doesn't matter.

  • I know it hasn't put a scrap of silver or gold in my pocket,

  • Uncle, but I believe it is good

  • and I believe it is righteous and I say God bless it.

  • (Bob clapping)

  • - Another word out of you, Cratchit,

  • and you'll be keeping your Christmas

  • by losing your position.

  • - Don't be angry, Uncle. Come and dine with us tomorrow.

  • - I'll see you in hell first.

  • - [Fred] But why, Uncle?

  • - Why? Let me ask you a question.

  • Why did you get married recently?

  • - Because I fell in love, of course.

  • - Love. You fell in love.

  • Good afternoon, Nephew.

  • - (chuckles) But you never came to see me

  • before I was married.

  • Why give it as a reason for not coming now?

  • - Good afternoon.

  • - [Fred] I want nothing from you.

  • I ask nothing of you. Why can't we be friends?

  • - Good afternoon!

  • - I am sorry to find you in so resolute.

  • Why, we've never had a quarrel, you and I,

  • but I came all this way to give you a greetings

  • and just to say God bless you and Merry Christmas,

  • so Merry Christmas, Uncle.

  • - Good afternoon!

  • - [Fred] And a Happy New Year.

  • - Good afternoon!

  • - And a Merry Christmas to you, Bob Cratchit.

  • - [Bob] Thank you, sir. And Merry Christmas to you.

  • - [Scrooge] (chuckles) There's another fellow, my clerk.

  • With 15 shillings a week and a wife and family to feed,

  • talking about a Merry Christmas.

  • (bell rings)

  • footsteps

  • Scrooge and Marley's I beleive

  • Have I the pleasure of addressing Mr. Scrooge or Mr. Marley?

  • - Marley's dead.

  • In fact, he died seven years ago this very night.

  • - Oh, I am quite sorry to hear it, but I have no doubt

  • his generosity is well represented by his surviving partner.

  • At this festive season of the year,

  • Mr. Scrooge, it is more than usually desirable

  • that we should make some slight provision

  • for the poor and needy,

  • those who suffer greatly at this present time.

  • (Scrooge yawns)

  • Many thousands are in want of basic needs.

  • Hundreds of thousands are in want of common comfort, sir.

  • - Are there no prisons? Did they disappear?

  • - Oh no, sir. There are still plenty of prisons.

  • - And the workhouses for the poor

  • are still in operation, I assume?

  • - They are. Still, I wish I could say they were not.

  • - The treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigor, then?

  • - Uh, yes, uh, very busy, sir.

  • - Well, I was afraid from what you had said

  • that something had stopped them from their useful course.

  • I'm glad to hear it.

  • - Given that they scarcely furnish Christian cheer, sir,

  • a few of us are trying to raise a fund to buy the poor

  • some meat and drink and some means of warmth.

  • We choose this time because it is a time above all others

  • when want is keenly felt and abundance rejoices.

  • What shall we put you down for?

  • - Nothing.

  • - Uh, you wish to remain anonymous?

  • - I wish to be left alone.

  • I don't make myself merry at Christmas,

  • and I can't afford to make idle people merry.

  • I am taxed for this institutions that I have mentioned

  • and they cost enough.

  • Those who are badly off must go there.

  • - But many can't go there and many would rather die.

  • - Oh well, if they would rather die,

  • perhaps they should go ahead and do it

  • and decrease the surplus population.

  • Besides I wouldn't know anything about it.

  • - [Man] Well, you could know it, sir.

  • - It's none of my business.

  • I have too much of my own business

  • to interfere with other people's.

  • Mine occupies me constantly,

  • and I thank you to leave me to it.

  • Good afternoon, gentlemen.

  • (bell rings)

  • (gentle peaceful music continues)

  • You'll want all day tomorrow, I suppose.

  • - If it's quite convenient, sir.

  • - It's not convenient, and it's not fair.

  • If I was to hold back a half a crown for it,

  • you'd think you were being abused, no doubt.

  • And yet you think me ill used

  • when I pay a day's wages for no work?

  • - It's only once a year, sir.

  • - Huh, poor excuse for picking a man's pocket

  • every 25th of December.

  • But I suppose you must have it.

  • Be here all the more earlier the next morning.

  • - Oh yes, sir, I shall, certainly shall.

  • (footsteps)

  • Goodnight, Mr. Scrooge.

  • (bell rings)

  • (Bob grunts)

  • (gentle mellow music)

  • Hello, son.

  • [Tiny Tim]- Papa!

  • Papa, look! It's Jesus in the manger.

  • You know, I'm glad I'm a cripple.

  • - And why's that, son?

  • - Because it makes people remember

  • who made the lame men walk and the blind men see.

  • - That's right, that's right. Out of the mouths of babes.

  • Hark, the herald angels sing

  • Glory to the newborn king

  • Peace on Earth and mercy mild

  • God and sinners reconciled

  • - [Scrooge] Time to go home.