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  • Are you lazy, greedy and selfish? Then you need to learn 'goblin mode',

  • Oxford's 2020 word of the year.

  • This is News Review from BBC Learning English,

  • I'm Neil. And I'm Beth.

  • Make sure you watch to the end to learn vocabulary to talk about the story.

  • Don't forget to subscribe to our channel, like this video

  • and try the quiz on our website.

  • Now, the story.

  • What word describes lazy, greedy, shameless behaviour?

  • It's 'goblin mode' and it's word of the year, according to one

  • UK publisher.

  • Since the pandemic,

  • some people have realised they don't want to go back

  • to the lifestyle they had before. They want to stay in goblin mode.

  • Oxford University Press chooses a word each year that reflects the mood

  • of the past twelve months.

  • You've been looking at the headlines,

  • Beth. What's the vocabulary?

  • We have speaks to, over and unveils.

  • This is News Review from BBC

  • Learning English.

  • Let's have a look at our first headline.

  • This one comes from the Guardian.

  • OK. Well, first of all 'goblin mode'.

  • A goblin is a small, ugly, possibly dangerous creature -

  • a fictional one. 'Mode' is a way of doing something. So, together,

  • 'goblin mode' describes a way of doing something in a

  • kind of unpleasant, slightly embarrassing way.

  • So, for example, Beth.

  • I'm sure you never did this,

  • but working from home, wearing pyjamas in bed.

  • No, never did that. No.

  • OK, that's goblin mode.

  • We're looking at the expression 'speaks to' and in the headline,

  • it's 'speaks to the times'. What does it mean?

  • 'speaks to the times' is a reflection of the mood of the people at that time.

  • So 'the times' referred to in the headline is talking about this current time,

  • so the post-pandemic world. During the pandemic when,

  • obviously key workers who had to do really essential jobs were very, very busy,

  • but a lot of other people were forced to be lazy because there was nothing to do.

  • Exactly. They enjoyed wearing their pyjamas, didn't wear make up,

  • they didn't care about their appearance as much, so they went 'goblin mode'.

  • Yeah. And so 'goblin mode' speaks to the times.

  • It means it reflects the times as they were.

  • Now, is this, is this common?

  • It is in American English and it is becoming more popular

  • in British English.

  • So, for example, we could say

  • that the climate crisis speaks to a failure of governments for decades.

  • Yeah, it means it reflects a failure.

  • Let's take a look at that again.

  • Let's take a look at our next headline.

  • This is from the Huffington Post.  

  • So, the headline says

  • that the word of the year 'sums up'

  • how we feel – 'sums up' means 'summarises'. We are looking though at

  • 'over' and that seems simple,

  • I know 'over'. You go over a bridge, the bridge goes over a river.

  • Is that what we're talking about?

  • Well, in your examples you've used 'over' as a preposition, but here,

  • it's actually an adjective.

  • Right, OK. So, what does it mean?

  • Well, if you're 'over' something

  • then you are tired, bored and unenthusiastic about something.

  • So, maybe initially, at the beginning,

  • you were quite enthusiastic,

  • but now you're ready for it to finish.

  • OK, so you've had enough of something, you're fed up.

  • Yeah, exactly. So, the World Cup.

  • I was quite enthusiastic about it at the beginning,

  • but now, I feel like it's been going for ages.

  • I am over it. Oh really?

  • I'm still really 'into' the World Cup and that's the opposite of 'over',

  • isn't it? It is

  • and we very often use

  • 'so' with this.

  • We say I am 'so over it'.

  • Now, in the headline,

  • it refers to how unenthusiastic people are about everything.

  • And when they say 'everything', they mean this year

  • all the negative events going on.

  • There's a lot of bad news around. This use of 'over'

  • is quite informal, isn't it?

  • Yeah. It's very often used in spoken conversation.

  • So, I might be having a chat with you and say I am over working from home,

  • I want to be in the office five days a week.

  • Well, here we are.

  • Let's take a look at that again.

  • Let's take a look at our next headline.

  • This one is from Fox News.

  • We are looking at the word 'unveils'. It makes me think of a traditional wedding

  • where a bride wears a veil over her face and then it's removed

  • everyone can see the face.

  • Yeah. It helps to think of it

  • in this way because that is the literal meaning of 'unveil' but here,

  • it's metaphorical and it just needs to reveal or uncover.

  • You can imagine, you said it's metaphorical,

  • that Oxford have this word 'goblin mode' with a little curtain over it,

  • they open it and we can all see it.

  • Yes, exactly.

  • This word is also used when something like a new exhibition

  • or a piece of art, is uncovered or revealed.

  • And politicians use it as well to talk about their plans.

  • But is it used in everyday conversation?

  • Can I say to you 'I'd like to unveil my Christmas plans'?

  • No, not really, because it's quite a grand thing.

  • It might be that a company or a celebrity might unveil something

  • so you'd probably just tell me what your Christmas plans are.

  • OK, let's look at that again.

  • We've had speaks toreflects,

  • overbored of something

  • that has been happening

  • for a long time

  • and unveilsshows for the first time.

  • Don't forget there's a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Thank you for joining us.

  • And goodbye. Bye.

Are you lazy, greedy and selfish? Then you need to learn 'goblin mode',

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