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  • The Silence of the Lambs just turned 25.

  • It's also one of the only three films in history that have

  • the distinction of winning the big five at the academy awards.

  • Those are two things you probably didn't know right out of the gate, but

  • I'm getting ahead of myself.

  • The point is, Oscar Sunday is just around the corner, making it the perfect time for

  • us to do this episode.

  • Here are nine things you didn't know about The Silence of the Lambs, probably.

  • (Sound) >> Doctor Lecter,

  • my name is Clarice Starling.

  • May I speak with you? >> Clarice Starling is

  • arguably Jodie Foster's most iconic role.

  • Foster has even said that Clarice was her favorite character out of any she's

  • ever played, so you might be surprised to learn that Jodie Foster was not the first

  • choice for Clarice.

  • Director Jonathan Demme had wanted Michelle Pfeiffer to play Clarice.

  • He'd worked with Pfeiffer on Married to the Mob and was courting her heavily to

  • join the Silence of the Lambs, but Michelle Pfeiffer turned it down.

  • Basically, the script was just too disturbing for her.

  • Jodie Foster was next on this list but several other actresses also went after

  • the role including Meg Ryan, Nicole Kidman and Halle Berry.

  • Obviously, Demme made a good call by going with his second choice.

  • After all, both he and Foster wound up scoring Oscars out of the deal.

  • (Sound) You know who else wasn't a first choice?

  • Anthony Hopkins. >> All good things to those who wait.

  • >> Jonathan Demme was going

  • after Sean Connery to play Hannibal Lector, but Connery,

  • like Michelle Pfeiffer, passed on the film.

  • And once again, it was probably for the best that Demme didn't get what he'd

  • originally wanted, since Anthony Hopkins also went on to win the Oscar.

  • (Sound) >> Still, I can't help but

  • be curious about what Connery would have been like as Hannibal.

  • >> Good evening, Clarice.

  • Something about fava beans. >> Don't you hurt my dog!

  • >> Don't you make me hurt your dog!

  • >> You don't know what pain is!

  • >> A lot of people think that Jame Gum,

  • aka Buffalo Bill, is based on a specific serial killer.

  • But he's actually a combination of three killers.

  • Gum is first based on Ted Bundy,

  • who had a similar tactic of luring women into his van and trapping them.

  • Bundy would wear an arm cast, hang around outside of libraries and

  • then drops his books so his target would want to come help him.

  • Next, we have Gary Heidnik, he was the inspiration for

  • the pit that Gum has in his basement.

  • Heidnik, however, would fill his pit with water and

  • would keep more than one victim at a time there.

  • He also did a lot of other stuff to them that's way too fucked up to get into

  • right now.

  • Third, Jame Gum is based on Ed Gein.

  • Ed Gein served as inspiration for a few other films,

  • too, including Psycho and Leatherface from the Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

  • All of the stuff with Buffalo Bill making masks and body suits out of his

  • victim's skin is based on (Bleep) that Ed Gain did to his victims.

  • Well, I'm sufficiently freaked out now, so why don't we move on to our next thing.

  • (Sound) Remember this scene where Clarice has her

  • last visit with Hannibal?

  • Well, you probably didn't know that the bars in Hannibal's cell

  • are wider than they should be.

  • The production team had to build it this way simply because they needed to be sure

  • the actor's eyes wouldn't be obscured by the bars.

  • If they had been as a real cell, it would have been nearly impossible to shoot

  • through the bars and still see both of their eyes.

  • And their eyes are important to see because acting.

  • >> Yeah, that was good.

  • (Sound) >> Here's another thing from that

  • same sequence.

  • See that guy leading them out of Hannibal's holding room with

  • the walkie talkie?

  • Well, that guy is George Romero.

  • In case you're drawing a blank, George Romero is a horror movie legend.

  • He wrote Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead.

  • Pretty much anything with the word dead in the title,

  • George Romero probably had a hand in it.

  • While we're on the subject of supporting roles played by people who are kind of

  • a big deal, let's do a little rapid fire bonus things you didn't know.

  • That's Danny Darce, the country western singer songwriter.

  • That's Chris Isaac in his second film role ever.

  • Of course, Chris Isaac is most famous as a singer-songwriter and for

  • (Bleep) Helena Christensen on the beach in Black and White.

  • That severed head is the film's producer, Edward Saxon.

  • Well, not literally, of course.

  • They molded a mask from his head and used it here.

  • Consider it his cameo.

  • Lastly, during the attempted raid on Jame Gum's house,

  • there's this guy, that's Ted Tally who wrote the screenplay for the film.

  • So that's boom, like, I don't know, four bonus things you didn't know.

  • Moving on.

  • (Sound) >> You do know the rules,

  • ma'am? >> Yes, Lieutenant Boyle,

  • I've questioned him before. >> One last thing about this sequence when

  • Hannibal escapes.

  • So this officer was played by the late Charles Napier.

  • Back in the 70s, Napier was kind of known for doing Russ Myer sexploitation flicks.

  • But Napier started working with Jonathan Demme in 1977.

  • Demme liked him and just kept putting Napier in all of his movies.

  • It really helped legitimize him and boasted his career.

  • Which, of course, set Napier up for his greatest role, Duke Phillips.

  • That's right the guy who got bludgeoned to death by Hannibal is

  • the same guy who played Jay Sherman's eccentric

  • billionaire boss on The Critic. >> Now if you'll excuse me I have

  • to put on some leather and go get spanked.

  • Vote for Duke.

  • Good night.

  • (Sound) >> Pretty much everyone agrees

  • that Silence of the Lambs is one of the great films, but

  • I love a movie mistake as much as the next jerk, so here we go.

  • Okay, so in this super freaky night vision sequence down in Jame Gum's terror cellar,

  • we have this part where he raises his pistol to shoot Clarice in the back.

  • But notice when he raises the gun it casts a shadow.

  • Problem is, it's pitch black down there,

  • that's why he's wearing night vision goggles.

  • So really his gun should not have cast a shadow because they're in total darkness.

  • Of course, making movies requires light.

  • They couldn't actually have it complete in total darkness on set or

  • else someone could trip over a cable, or

  • accidentally grab diet coke from craft services instead of regular.

  • And most importantly, if the set were pitch black, the cameras wouldn't be able

  • to record anything, leaving us with this minor but interesting movie mistake.

  • (Sound) >> So powerful, so

  • beautiful. >> Let's talk about all of the moths.

  • As you might have suspected, they did have a couple of mechanical moths that they

  • used for certain shots and scenes in the film.

  • But you probably didn't realize that the filmmakers mainly used moths that were in

  • suspended animation and then warmed them up enough to get them to reanimate.

  • They even had a moth wrangler on their crew who supplied them with moths at

  • various stages of life, like for this part with Gum removing the proboscis sheath.

  • The moths had to be kept in rooms with special controls for humidity and heat.

  • And some even had specially designed body shields, basically moth costuming.

  • But don't worry, they didn't use a real moth for this part.

  • The cocoon here, was actually made out of candy.

  • Mainly, so that if the actor accidentally swallowed it,

  • it would be totally edible and way tastier than a real cocoon.

  • (Sound) Even in a movie with people getting their

  • faces eaten, this is one of the most cringe worthy moments, yuck.

  • But it may make you happy to know that, that's not real.

  • It's a prosthetic nipple.

  • So, it's a fake nipple that's really been pierced, I guess.

  • If you ask me, that nipple is just as convincing as anything else in the movie.

  • Someone give that nipple an Oscar. >> All right, guys, let us

  • know if you're excited for the Oscars this Sunday, and what you predictions are.

  • Or, you can also let us know if you don't give any (Bleep) at all.

  • Like not even one (Bleep).

  • Thanks for watching and be sure to check out cinefix.com and subscribe for

  • more trueish things about movies, and sometimes fake nipples that look a little

  • too realistic, right here, on Things You Didn't Know.

  • (Sound)

The Silence of the Lambs just turned 25.

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