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  • the allied forces eventually poured into Nazi Germany and freed it from Hitler's reign, but they didn't act alone.

  • The Nazis had been resisted, sabotaged and exposed from all corners.

  • Few of these fighters were uniformed soldiers.

  • Most were civilians and these 11 unlikely warriors became the Nazis worst nightmares number 11.

  • Swing.

  • You can can you liberated town from an oppressive government through the power of Dance.

  • It's easy when the worst you're up against his a cranky pastor who banned the prom less.

  • So when you're up against a brutal Nazi soldiers, but that didn't stop the swing.

  • You got a group of teenagers and college age Germans in the late 19 thirties, they were mostly upper class and educated.

  • They loved american culture.

  • Hitler sought to force conformity and military aesthetic on Germany's youth and he viewed these freewheeling dancers as a threat.

  • So naturally they kept on dancing as the Nazi forces cracked down and closed most of Germany's illicit dance halls.

  • The swing you gin went underground, they spoke in english, making their plans harder for the authorities to follow.

  • Eventually, the government declared the group illegal in 1941 and the leaders were sent to concentration camps as were any found dancing after the order.

  • The teenagers were sent to the youth concentration camp of mourning in but the movement was never stomped out completely and many german teens never embraced Nazism.

  • After all, you can't stop the beat.

  • Hitler also found out the hard way that the pen is mightier than the sword.

  • Number 10 fritz Gerlach as the Nazis took control in 1933.

  • Many ordinary Germans were skeptical about their ruthless new leader, but the oppression hadn't reached them yet.

  • So they figured what's the worst they can do.

  • But one journalists fritz Gerlach knew better.

  • The trained historian had been involved in liberal student groups and was a staunch opponent of anti Semitism.

  • And starting in the 19 twenties, he served as editor of one of the biggest newspapers in Munich and he used his position tirelessly to warn the citizens of Germany that Hitler was dangerous and when it became too dangerous to speak out, he refused to stop Hitler officially seize power in january 1933 and he wasted no time targeting his enemies.

  • Gear locks, words calling nationalism of philosophy that would lead to tyranny and war spread far and Hitler wouldn't stand for that.

  • It would be less than two months before Gerlach was arrested and he was sent to dock out the prison camp that would become one of Germany's most notorious institutions, but he wouldn't stay there long.

  • Just over a year later, the brutal purge known as the night of the long knives occurred.

  • Killing many of Hitler's imprisoned enemies.

  • Gerlach was one of the many casualties, but his words were impossible to disappear and the world's awareness of Hitler's brutality would only increase thanks to him.

  • This next agent of resistance opposed the Nazis with a velvet glove number nine Hannah self in her early years.

  • Hen itself was a charmed woman, she married the powerful will himself, the governor of german occupied Samoa when she was barely 20 and spent years in a tropical paradise.

  • But in 1928 the family moved back to Berlin, just as the Nazis were beginning to move closer to power.

  • The family was comfortable and not threatened by the regime, but when Wilhelm died in 1936 Hennequin no longer be silent.

  • She and her friend Elizabeth von that and were determined to resist and they had a secret weapon.

  • Tea parties.

  • They were after all harmless societal ladies.

  • They would host gatherings of intellectuals who were no longer able to speak out publicly against the Nazi regime and the so called self circle became instrumental in helping those targeted by the Nazis flee the country.

  • But they were eventually infiltrated by a Nazi spy and the entire self circle was deported to Ravensbruck to face execution.

  • While van Patten was executed, Hennes Sulfur and her daughter were saved by the Red Army With self living.

  • Until 1954.

  • No one was safe in Nazi Germany, not even the men of God, but that didn't stop this next one.

  • Number eight, Bishop Clemens, august Graf von Galen, Much of Hitler's regime was dedicated to targeting people for their ethnic background or their political views, but they weren't the only victims.

  • Hitler was obsessed with the superiority of the german bloodline and as such, he viewed, the sick and disabled as undesirable.

  • When 1939 rolled around, Hitler announced Operation T Four, a brutal series of sanctions that were designed to eliminate the disabled population of Germany parents were encouraged to abandon their disabled kids for elimination.

  • Religious figures around the country were horrified and for at least one, it was too much to tolerate.

  • Bishop Clemens, august graf von Galen was known for his anti nazi views and had previously spoken out against their racist views.

  • But even as oppression of the catholic church increased, von Galen became more vocal about the targeting of the disabled.

  • It turned many catholic figures against the Nazis and Hitler's unofficial truce with the current pope meant targeting the bishop of Munster would have been a bridge too far.

  • Ultimately, while the targeting of the disabled continued until the end of the war, Operation T four ended in 1941 and von Galen lived to see Germany liberated before his death in 1946 he wasn't the only catholic figure to resist the Nazi regime.

  • Number seven, Gertrude Lochner born in Liverpool to german parents scared Trude Lochner lived in Germany since she was a small child and she was horrified to see her country descend into fascism, A devout pacifist, she soon joined the german Catholics peace association, a group responsible for helping many jewish Germans escaped the country before it was too late and while many Germans still saw Hitler as a mere centric, she was warning that he was a genocidal madman and on november 9th 1938 she would be proven right.

  • Kristallnacht was a brutal warning sign, but for many it was too late.

  • As restrictions on jews tightened, Lockner and her fellow pacifists organized help them buy food.

  • When the deportations began, they hid jewish neighbors wherever they could and help them escape when possible.

  • But the Nazis were monitoring her actions and in 1943 she was arrested on one of her travels.

  • She was sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp, but the Nazis didn't execute er She was held as a political prisoner and survived the war, but her will was undeterred after the war, she promoted cooperation between jews and christians was honored for her work by Israel and remained a strong peace activist until her death in 1995.

  • Sometimes hope can survive in the darkest places number six Stanislava less jenny Ska.

  • The german occupation of Poland was notoriously brutal unless jenny Ska worked as a midwife until she and her family were forcibly relocated when her street was converted to part of a jewish ghetto.

  • She helped the residents of the ghetto delivering them food and documents and wound up sharing their fate.

  • When she was caught, she was deported to the infamous Auschwitz concentration camp along with her daughter and countless jewish prisoners there, she met the infamous dr Manjula and her experience in birth led to her being drafted by him to report on birth conditions in the camp, It would lead to an opportunity for salvation.

  • She worked as a midwife at the camp and was horrified to learn that the infants were to be drowned after birth.

  • She sabotaged this effort, tattooing jewish babies who looked sufficiently german so they would be taken away and adopted out by german families.

  • It's estimated that she saved as many as 500 Children and save the lives of countless mothers by treating them after birth.

  • She survived the war and continued working as a midwife, dying in 1974.

  • And a campaign is ongoing to make her a roman catholic saint.

  • She wasn't the only health care worker to oppose the Nazis, but none made a bigger impact than this.

  • Next one.

  • Number five, Nancy Wake Nancy wake was making history from early life in New Zealand becoming one of the first woman of mystery descent to marry a european.

  • She lived in France with her husband when the country fell to the Nazis and she was horrified by the brutality.

  • While she was a trained journalist and certainly not a warrior, she felt the need to take action.

  • Working as an ambulance driver.

  • She eventually fell into the company of Captain Ian Garrow secret escape line and they realized wake had a unique advantage.

  • She was really, really good at escaping working as a courier.

  • Her unassuming and feminine appearance made her less likely to be suspected by the Nazis, but they were soon on her trail and she had to flee France tragically.

  • Her husband back in France was killed, but that just made her more determined.

  • She would return to France to train warriors in the resistance and personally lead a branch of 7000 members.

  • She would continue her mission after the war, even briefly becoming a british intelligence officer, one of the most highly decorated women in World War Two history.

  • She would become famous for once killing an SS century with her bare hands and would live to the age of 98.

  • After the war, we suspect death was a bit nervous to try to take her.

  • But few of World War Two warriors willingly stare death in the face like this man.

  • Number four V told Palevsky vetoed.

  • Palevsky was already a veteran when the nazis invaded Poland.

  • Having served in the polish soviet war when he was still a teenager, he'd become a military officer, but the army was completely overwhelmed by the german war machine.

  • He refused to evacuate with his fellow soldiers to France and instead joined the polish resistance.

  • He and a large number of his men were eventually captured and sent to Auschwitz concentration camp.

  • But debates remain as to the circumstances of his capture was he simply caught or did he allow himself to be caught while in the camp, he became a secret resistance fighter while in prison.

  • He barely avoided being shot and took every opportunity to sabotage the nazis and steal food for his fellow prisoners.

  • He collected information on the camps and reported it back to his superiors when he was able to escape from the camp in 1943.

  • While working the night shift, it became the first comprehensive report on the brutal conditions of the Nazi camps and were told returned to duty and fought in the polish resistance until the end of the war.

  • But tragically, he would not be able to continue that legacy.

  • For long after the war.

  • He was captured while spying for the polish government in exile by the communist authorities in 1947 and executed a year later.

  • Many of the most heroic figures of the war were the ones most endanger number three vera Atkins growing up in Romania as vera May Rosenberg, the jewish woman watched with fear as the nazis gained power in 1937.

  • Not long before the start of World War Two, she decided to move to Britain and her education and skills and language, let her befriend many diplomats.

  • As tensions ramped up, she was recruited by Britain's top spy masters to collect intel on nazi Germany and that meant she'd have to head back into enemy territory a mission, she accepted and it would only be the beginning of a successful spy career, One that would send echoes through the world and Hollywood Atkins became the head of the british spy agencies f division which was tasked with infiltrating France.

  • She was a master at blending in thanks to her european roots and managed to survive the war.

  • Her involvement in evacuating Poland's enigma code breakers helped the allies win the war and after the Nazis fell, she was a key in helping track down many of the regime's worst war criminals.

  • The unassuming woman acted more like a secretary than the skilled spy she was.

  • Which leads many to believe she was the inspiration for the character Moneypenny and Ian Fleming's James Bond series.

  • Few heroes though, we're more unlikely than the next one.

  • Number two Virginia Hall.

  • If you're looking for a spy, you're probably not going to guess.

  • It was the mousey looking woman with a wooden leg.

  • That's exactly what Virginia Hall was betting on.

  • Having lost her leg in a hunting accident.

  • As a young adult, the american woman worked as a consular clerk in Poland.

  • In the 19 thirties, she was turned down for a position as a diplomat because they didn't hire the disabled so she resigned and went abroad to work for Britain's spy agency, the Special operations executive.

  • She was soon deployed to France.

  • Only the second female agent ever to be deployed to the occupied country.

  • Her exploits there would be the stuff of legend.

  • Nazi occupied France was a dangerous place, but Hall knew how to get intelligence.

  • She befriended a brothel owner for intelligence, helped down pilots escape back to England and even liberated people from prison camp.

  • The limping lady became one of the most wanted people in vichy France and she was eventually forced to flee.

  • After organizing a jailbreak of 12 captured agents, she went on the lam, walking across the Pyrenees to neutral Spain where she was arrested, the americans organized to release and she continued in the spy game, eventually becoming one of the first women ever hired by the CIA.

  • But some heroes come from the most unlikely places.

  • Number one Junior Tsujihara, the Japanese and Germans were close allies, their alliance lasting the duration of the war, so Japanese diplomats had special status june Tsujihara was an educated man, fluent in Russian and german and he was a fast rising diplomat in the years before the war, he would be appointed as vice counsel at the Japanese consulate in Lithuania in 1939.

  • Ordered to report on soviet and german actions in the region.

  • He cooperated with polish intelligence, but it would be less than a year before the Germans rolled in and conquered Lithuania and Sogahata had a choice to make.

  • When the Germans occupied a country, the jewish residents quickly found themselves under fire, countless refugees tried to flee, but it was near impossible to find a place to take them.

  • While the Japanese government had strict regulations for visas to come to Japan.

  • Tsujihara ignored those orders and he began granting visas to Japan for jewish refugees working around the clock, signing them and ultimately saving at least 2200 people and maybe more, all while defying his superiors and risking his own life.

  • Had he been caught while he and his family survived the war, it would ruin his career in the Foreign Ministry and it would be decades before his actions were properly acknowledged.

  • But before his death in 1986 he would be acknowledged by Israel as one of the righteous among the nations.

  • For more on resistance to the Nazis, check out how the soldiers single handedly liberated an entire german occupied city or watch what happened to the Nazi leaders after World War Two.

  • For more on the bad guys.

the allied forces eventually poured into Nazi Germany and freed it from Hitler's reign, but they didn't act alone.

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Nazis' Worst Nightmare: WW2 Legends That Defied Evil

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/12/05
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