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  • i'm in southeast asia with  my 1913 bradshaw's handbook  

  • published at the height of european imperialism my  100 year old guy book will leave me on a railway  

  • adventure through archipelagos and peninsulas  dotted with hills forests and paddy fields  

  • i'll tour towering mega cities and magnificent  mosques i'll encounter golden buddhas and jewelled  

  • temples and experience some of the world's most  spectacular and notorious railways as i travel  

  • through the diverse nations of this vast region  i'll learn how they asserted their independence  

  • against the british french and dutch empires to  become the economic tigers and dragons of today

  • my two and a half thousand mile exploration  of southeast asia begins in hong kong

  • my bradshaws 1913 tells me that hong kong is  the chief center for british commerce in china  

  • and the most important military and naval  station in the far east it is the principal port  

  • of the british empire the tonnage being more  than double that of london britain had won it  

  • after a disgraceful war but its permissive  government allowed the economic dynamism of the  

  • chinese population to make it into a great success  when britain gave up control in 1997 the people's  

  • republic of china agreed to respect its autonomy  but in recent years the anxiety of hong kongers  

  • to preserve their separateness has led to mass  demonstrations which beijing dislikes and fears

  • my first port of call will be the kowloon  peninsula before i cross victoria harbour  

  • to hong kong island i'll head north to visit  the walled villages of the new territories  

  • and west to the remote and tranquil lantau island  on my travels i hear what british colonization  

  • meant for hong kong they had transformed what  was once referred to as a baron island into an  

  • international metropolis learn the traditional art  of noodle making i hope no one comes in now and  

  • discover the extent of britain's railway ambition  in asia the british were building railways all  

  • across china they wanted hong kong's position as  the main port in southern china to be strengthened

  • this global trading and financial hub sits  on one of the world's finest natural harbors

  • flanked by mountains and sea hong kong's  420 square miles are home to seven and a  

  • half million people it's one of the most  densely populated places in the world  

  • when britain returned hong kong to china in  1997 the territory became a chinese special  

  • administrative region with a distinct  political system i've alighted at kowloon

  • hong kong first impressions with about  

  • 9 000 high-rise buildings eat  your heart out new york city

  • i'm in the avenue of stars where  hong kongers celebrate their cinema  

  • industry the waterfront promenade overlooks  victoria harbour and hong kong island beyond

  • the first chinese war the opium war says  bradshaw's terminated in 1842 by the session  

  • of hong kong island to england and the opening  of chinese ports to british trade a journey  

  • through colonial history is an uncomfortable ride  past imperial atrocities at a time when both the  

  • chinese and the british felt racially superior  but britain's war to impose its opium upon china  

  • was one of its least noble ventures it's pointless  trying to apply the values of the 21st century  

  • to the 19th the conflict gave hong kong  to britain and this has been the result

  • to understand the role that opium  played in british colonial rule  

  • i'm meeting historian dr chichi huang  

  • chichi in the 1830s and 1840s why was it so  important to britain to send opium to china in the  

  • 19th century the east india company were trading  with china and they were importing a lot of tea  

  • porcelain and silks to britain and they were  paying the chinese government the qing government  

  • than in silver and of course this is really  expensive um they were running out of silver and  

  • so the east india company imported opium from  india into china as a way of addressing this  

  • trade imbalance the merchants of the british east  india company made good profits on chinese goods  

  • but the chinese weren't interested in acquiring  british products in return they wanted only  

  • silver so this powerful corporation and  others smuggled indian opium into china  

  • customers paid in silver which was used to  buy the tea by 1839 sales of opium to china  

  • funded britain's entire tea trade within a year 10  million chinese people were addicted to opium and  

  • china took steps to impound and destroy it britain  responded with the full might of the royal navy  

  • blockading and besieging chinese ports  and forcing china into submission  

  • what was the result of the war so after some  back and forth captain charles elliot decides to  

  • conclude the war a treaty was signed to hand over  this island of hong kong to britain how would you  

  • describe at the time the british attitude to the  chinese and the chinese attitude to the british  

  • there was a big misunderstanding in a cultural  perception so the british believed the chinese  

  • to be quite stubborn they refused to trade with  them how dare they the chinese government did  

  • really believe that they were the center of the  world and that they didn't need the outside world  

  • the island didn't look like this then what  was it like it was basically a fishing island  

  • there wasn't any infrastructure as we know it  now the british were very quick to bring in  

  • roads the land was reclaimed into the sea  here so there was a lot more flat land to  

  • build on rather than just steep hills and it  was a lot greener by the time my guidebook  

  • what had the british managed to make of hong kong  they had transformed what was once referred to  

  • as a baron island into an international  metropolis it was the third most busy port city  

  • after london and liverpool by the turn of the  20th century they were very proud of it it was  

  • almost an example of what a good british tropical  city should look like and should function like

  • i'm leaving the kowloon peninsula  to explore the area surrendered  

  • to the british after the first opium war  

  • off to hong kong island and  surely there's only one way to go  

  • 50 000 people a day can't be wrong take the ferry

  • the ferry is one of the things you have to do  when you visit these boats have been going back  

  • and forth since 1888 and until 1972  when they built a road tunnel this was  

  • the only practical way to make the journey and  what a way to see this extraordinary island

  • i've arrived in the district  of central on hong kong island  

  • the first area to be colonized  by the british in 1842

  • today it's the financial and retail district  and home to the hong kong and shanghai bank  

  • founded in 1865 by scottish shipping merchant  thomas sutherland to finance the colony's growing  

  • trade the bank's present building designed by  norman foster is an icon of the city skyline  

  • amidst this density of buildings and in  humidity that tops 80 percent in the summer  

  • hong kong's climate is challenging to  escape the mugginess i'm making a journey  

  • suggested in my guidebook which begins just  10 minutes walk away from the hsbc building  

  • bradshaw's tells me that in the hot season  people live in bungalows at the peak  

  • where quite a town has grown up connected with  the city by the funicular rail it's now rather  

  • misleadingly called the peak tram but it's  a survivor and the technology is the same  

  • and in a moment it will whisk me nearly 400  meters for an unforgettable view of hong kong  

  • at the time of my bradshaws the highest mountain  in hong kong the peak was reserved for privileged  

  • expatriates to retreat from the scorching summer  heat before the advent of the funicular in 1888  

  • wealthy residents were  carried up by chinese bearers  

  • bradshaws tells me that the usual conveyances  are sedan chairs and the image of wiry chinese  

  • toiling up the peak carrying portly europeans  is a kind of stereotype of empire and it makes  

  • me relieved that the funicular would at least  have made it unnecessary going up the mountain  

  • the peak tram was the first cable funicular  railway in asia on its first day 600 people took  

  • the journey to the top by the end of its first  year it had carried 150 000 passengers you think  

  • when you're amongst those high buildings you can't  get higher but you can when you're at the peak

  • bright lights of the ultimate metropolis

  • this is one of 14 rolls-royce  phantoms bought by my hotel in 2006  

  • the manufacturer's largest ever single  order the paintwork is in peninsular green

  • i've returned to kowloon  

  • thank you very much indeed thank you

  • the peninsula hotel built beside the keys  where liners from all over the world docked  

  • and next to the railway station which was  the terminus of the trans-siberian railway  

  • when it opened its doors in 1928 it was intended  to be the most luxurious hotel east of suez there  

  • were regular tea dances and nightly dinner and  dancing i'll settle for air conditioning and a few

  • i've spent the night in hong kong's oldest hotel  

  • the peninsula hotel with its magnificent views is  named after the kowloon peninsula which was seeded  

  • to britain by china in 1860 after the second opium  war in a very unequal treaty the hotel served as  

  • the headquarters for japan after it seized the  colony and the british governor was humiliated in  

  • a surrender ceremony on the third floor below us  on christmas day 1941. the hotel had been founded  

  • by two jewish brothers from iraq and at the end  of the second world war jews who had fled europe  

  • were being repatriated through hong kong and were  invited to sleep in the hotel ballroom this region  

  • has been described as the far east but hong kong  has always been very close to british interests

  • over the road from the hotel i've spotted  an intriguing remnant of the colonial era

  • now here's a mystery a solitary clock tower by  the water's edge would anyone build such a noble  

  • soaring structure to stand alone i think  not and who needed to know the time  

  • railway passengers slaves to their  bradshaw's timetables scurrying  

  • towards relentlessly punctual trains i havenose for the site of a former railway station  

  • and although not a brick remains accepting the  clock tower i'm sure that there was one here  

  • and my guidebook tells me that the kowloon to  canton railway opened towards the end of 1911.

  • adonis ming young lee from the university  of hong kong is writing his phd on railway  

  • history in the region oh my god nice  to meet you very good to meet you

  • my guidebook tells me that the railway line into  kowloon opened only in 1911 which is quite late  

  • for a railway because hong kong was  already well connected yeah hong kong  

  • had many connections by sea and by river and  there were actually early plans for railway  

  • all the way back in the mid 19th century but  that was never materialized what about railway  

  • building in china generally had other railways  been built there were many uh foreign concessions  

  • that were granted to various countries to  build these railways for example you had  

  • the chinese eastern railway up in the north that  linked the trans-siberian railway to manchuria  

  • and then vladivostok the other railway  lines in china who had been building them  

  • you had germans up in shangdong the northwest you  had russians up in north china you also had the  

  • french in the southwest as well and of course the  british were building railways all across china  

  • germans russians french did the british in hong  kong feel threatened by these imperial competitors  

  • certainly there were british merchants and  chinese merchants that wanted a connection from  

  • hong kong to canton they wanted the trunk line  to have its southern terminus in hong kong and  

  • nowhere else they wanted hong kong's position  as the main port in southern china to be  

  • strengthened the construction of the line from  canton present-day guangzhou to hong kong was  

  • plagued with problems the mountainous terrain was  challenging it took five years to build the track  

  • and cost more than double the estimate the  kowloon station eventually opened in 1916.  

  • i've guessed that the old railway  terminus was here what was it like  

  • so this was a massive red brick building  right in the center of the urban area of  

  • kowloon but unfortunately in the 1970s due to  the need for land the station was demolished  

  • well was it quite an attractive station would  you say i'd say so red brick buildings are in  

  • fact clock towers are hard to come by in hong kong  so it was definitely an attraction in itself and  

  • it was possible to travel from europe to hong  kong by train tell me about that journey yeah  

  • you would have taken the trans-siberian railway  across the great eurasian plains and the great  

  • eurasian continent made a connection at  beijing and come down here to hong kong  

  • although that would have been a long journey it  would still have been quicker than coming by sea  

  • yes and as a railway historian a lot more  exciting than traveling by boats exactly so  

  • the old terminus has gone today hong kong is  connected to the rest of china by high-speed  

  • trains and travelers begin their 1 000 mile  journey to beijing from a new station in kowloon

  • hong kong west kowloon high speed station  an extremely futuristic structure that to me  

  • looks a little bit like a giant squid but it  also intrigues me as to know what lies inside  

  • opened in 2018 the station's giant curtain  wall features over 4 000 glass panels

  • it's the largest underground  high-speed rail station in the world

  • well the station with these curved ceiling beams  and these splayed columns really is spectacular  

  • minutes after they depart this station trains  leave the special administrative region of  

  • hong kong so along with the ticket offices  and waiting halls there's also a checkpoint  

  • railways are political the british  use them throughout their empire  

  • to carry away jewels and silks and spices to  europe and to rush troops to quell rebellions  

  • his high speed line is controversial  partly because a village was swept  

  • away in its construction partly because  it overran its budget and this station  

  • does seem to be several times bigger that is  strictly necessary but mainly because in part  

  • of the station down below officials of the  people's republic of china enforce their own  

  • national laws which many here regard as  an infringement of hong kong's sovereignty  

  • behind the news station  the back streets of kowloon  

  • are packed with traditional cantonese eateries  

  • i've arranged to meet a restaurant owner who makes  

  • his noodles in a way that would have  been familiar to the bradshaw traveler

  • hello

  • can you help me please i'm looking for chum  goku this way okay this way getting out again

  • the sham shui po district is a working  class area of densely packed restaurants  

  • and apartment buildings i don't know where  we're going firmly off the beaten track now

  • oh

  • thank you thank you oh i'm after you up to  you this can't be right we're going to a flat

  • oh wow really

  • hello thank you so much thank you  thank you we found it yeah okay  

  • you know i can go here oh my goodness wow but your  home is completely well covered in flower dust  

  • you have sacks of flour everywhere this this  is your noodle factory at home yeah it's a  

  • old style noodle milk factory in at  home in hong kong it's it's amazing  

  • it's has this been in your family forlong time yeah from my grandfather yeah and  

  • and is there a traditional way of making noodles  and then a modern way of making noodles it's a

  • old style to tell lead to making lude by bamboo  

  • no i can't imagine what that means  can you show me how do you do it okay

  • this one yeah guess what oh sorry

  • this i don't believe thisdon't believe but what yeah

  • i'm in the fifth floor flat with a man i've  never met before who's bouncing up and down on  

  • a bamboo pole to make noodles this is amazing  could i try that yeah sure yeah one by one

  • like this yeah

  • it's i hope no one comes in now okay  oh that is exhausting in this heat  

  • good so how many times you do that again and  again again and again i think six to eight  

  • times wow so is it the best restaurants that  use handmade noodles is it a matter of taste  

  • do some people love to have noodles that are  made in the old-fashioned way yes i think so  

  • do they taste better yeah absolutely my father  say dancing in the mouth that's a nice expression  

  • yeah a noodle dancing in the mouth after the  noodle maker has danced on the bamboo pole

  • back at the noodle restaurant i'm eager to  taste the results of my efforts hello thank you

  • ah thank you very much a lovely wonton noodle  soup with dumplings of pork and shrimp and noodles

  • very good a little crunchy  and dancing in the mouth

  • next time i meet a descendant of one of hong  kong's oldest dynasties your family has been  

  • here how long over a thousand years learn  about the father of modern china sanyasen  

  • is the person who came and made change in a huge  way and discover why hong kongers are protesting  

  • 20 years after the handover were  not being given what was promised  

  • the anger and the frustration  is there and it's escalating

  • great asian railway journeys  continues tomorrow at 6 30  

  • but next music poetry and powerful testimony  intertwined to mark holocaust memorial day  

  • you

i'm in southeast asia with  my 1913 bradshaw's handbook  

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B1 UK hong kong railway british china chinese

波迪路介紹hong kong

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    Yiu Fung Chow posted on 2021/11/08
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