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  • Here is the impact that will happen if we all manage to raise $30 million dollars and

  • remove 30 million pounds of trash from the ocean, but first let's see why we are doing

  • this.

  • Explorer Victor Vescovo was a terrifying 35,853 feet (10,928 meters) underwater.

  • A new record for manned descents into the Marianas Trench.

  • While he was investigating the deepest ocean trench on Earth, Vescovo identified three

  • new species of deep-sea life including a shrimp-like crustacean, and he also discovered something

  • else.

  • Something incredible.

  • What he found was… a plastic bag.

  • That's right, nearly 7 miles down at the bottom of one of the world's most remote

  • habitats, a place where no human had gone before, was contaminated with our garbage.

  • Humanity has treated the ocean badly.

  • For years, we've had an out of sight out of mind mentality.

  • If we didn't see it, it's not there.

  • But we've dumped so much trash in the sea, currents have formed debris into 5 giant garbage

  • patches.

  • The largestthe Great Pacific Garbage Patch is 1.6 million square kilometers, an

  • area twice the size of Texas or three times the size of France, and it's estimated to

  • contain 80,000 tonnes of plastic, which weighs as much as 500 Jumbo Jets.

  • And all this trash is a big, big problem.

  • Plastic and other trash can cloud the water, altering light levels and reducing oxygen,

  • therefore affecting the ability to support aquatic life.

  • 100,000 marine animals die each year from getting entangled in plastic, and those are

  • just the ones we find and can count, while millions more mistake microplastic for food

  • and eat it causing them to choke or starve when their digestive systems get blocked with

  • plastic.

  • And then when bigger animals eat the smaller ones, chemicals from the plastic the little

  • ones had consumed accumulate in their tissues.

  • Bigger animals that includethat's right, us.

  • When humans eat seafood, those same chemicals can end up in our bodies too.

  • In 2015, National Geographic reported that there's an estimated 5.25 trillion pieces

  • of plastic debris in the ocean.

  • About 269,000 tons float on the surface, while some four billion plastic microfibers per

  • square kilometer drift in the depths.

  • These microplastic fibers occur when larger pieces of plastic are broken down by sun exposure

  • and wave action.

  • To make matters worse, as the plastic continues to degrade it releases chemicals that further

  • contaminate the ocean.

  • Most plastics will take a long, long time to completely break down.

  • Hundreds of years in fact.

  • That's year after year of plastics slowly poisoning marine life.

  • Thankfully, many groups have been working on cleaning the ocean including #TeamSeas.

  • Their current campaign is to remove 30 Million pounds of plastic and trash from our ocean,

  • rivers and beaches.

  • The removal of this trash has both immediate and long-term wide-ranging positive effects

  • on the ocean's ecosystem.

  • It means fewer seals and dolphins end up tangled in discarded fishing nets.

  • Less plastic bags in the water means fewer sea turtles mistake them for delicious jellyfish.

  • It stops the breakdown and hazardous slow leak of chemicals from that plastic into the

  • water.

  • Cleaner water means healthier phytoplankton, which is the foundation for the marine food

  • chain.

  • It's a little hard to wrap your mind around how much 30 million pounds is, but let's

  • try.

  • The largest animal on earth, an adult blue whale can weigh about 330,000 lbs (149,685

  • kg).

  • So 3 blue whales weigh roughly a million pounds.

  • That means the amount of plastic waste that #Team Seas is going to remove from the ocean

  • is the equivalent of 90 full-grown, adult blue whales.

  • If you're feeling cynical and don't think that 30 Million pounds is enough, don't

  • worry.

  • This is just the beginning and an ambitious plan is underway to achieve a 90% reduction

  • of floating ocean plastic by 2040.

  • Here are 5 reasons why humanity must take care of the ocean.

  • Fresh oxygen.

  • The ocean covers about 70% of the earth's surface, contains 97% of the earth's water,

  • and produces over half of the world's oxygen.

  • Microscopic phytoplankton absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen back into the atmosphere

  • through photosynthesis.

  • The ocean absorbs 50 times more carbon dioxide than our atmosphere.

  • Temperature and weather balancing.

  • The ocean helps to regulate the earth's climate.

  • Not only does it soak up the majority of the sun's rays, but currents spread out the

  • heat.

  • Warm water is transported from the equator to the poles, and cold water from the poles

  • to the tropics.

  • Without these currents, many regions would be inhabitable or experience extreme weather.

  • The ocean absorption of carbon dioxide also helps to keep our global climate in check.

  • The ocean plays a key role in the water cycle, thereby creating weather.

  • The sun shines, the warm currents heat the ocean, water evaporates forming clouds, increasing

  • air temperature and humidity.

  • The clouds then get blown back over the land, it rains, the water nourishes the planet and

  • then makes its way back to the ocean.

  • If it wasn't for the ocean and the water cycle process, the earth would be a desert.

  • Home to marine life.

  • The ocean is the biggest habitat on the planet.

  • There are about 18,000 known species of fish.

  • There are some 240,000 known marine species.

  • Scientists estimated that there are another 500,000-2 million marine organisms yet to

  • be discovered.

  • It's an important source of food.

  • The ocean is the number one source of protein for more than a billion people.

  • Fish accounts for about 15.7% of the animal protein consumed globally.

  • Humans also use algae and sea plants for sushi and other dishes.

  • In recent years seaweed has become a trendy health food snack.

  • The ocean has therapeutic properties.

  • Anti-viral drugs Zovirax and Acyclovir were isolated from nucleosides in Caribbean sponges.

  • Molluscs and other species have been found to have cancer-fighting agents.

  • Researchers are marine prospecting for aquatic biotechnology around volcanic vents on the

  • seabed in the hopes of developing materials resistant to heat and toxins.

  • We have barely scratched the surface of the medicinal and biotechnologies the ocean may

  • have to offer us.

  • Being near the ocean itself can be therapeutic.

  • Various studies have shown improved mental and physical health in those who spend time

  • near the coast.

  • The scenery is restful.

  • The sound of the waves is relaxing and promotes a meditative state.

  • There are a variety of ways you can care for the ocean.

  • Here are just 7 of them:

  • Educate yourself.

  • The facts in this video is just the tip of the iceberg.

  • Learn about the various issues affecting our oceans and how your particular community plays

  • into them.

  • Support local efforts and public officials who pursue good ocean policy.

  • Don't litter.

  • Storm drains flow into local waterways which ultimately flow into the ocean.

  • When it rains, trash-clogged storm drains can back up and make streets flood.

  • Also, lots of junk is pushed into the water system and into the ocean.

  • Reduce Pollutants.

  • Choose nontoxic chemicals and dispose of pesticides, motor oil, and cleaning products properly.

  • Never simply dump hazardous materials down a drain, this pollutes your local water system.

  • Reduce waste.

  • Shop wisely.

  • Be mindful of what you purchase, because one day it will be trash.

  • Support companies that practice green manufacturing and limit wasteful packaging.

  • Opt not to use single-use plastics such as plastic cutlery, plastic bags, and balloons.

  • Invest in environmentally friendly items such as cloth shopping bags and reusable water

  • bottles.

  • Volunteer!

  • Participate in cleanups at the beach and local watersheds in your community.

  • If your community doesn't have a cleanup day or program, consider starting one.

  • Tell a friend.

  • Share your knowledge with friends and encourage them to join you in donating to clean the

  • ocean, volunteering, and reducing waste.

  • And of course, donate to the #TeamSeas campaign to clean the ocean.

  • All donations to #TeamSeas will be split equally between 2 nonprofit charities: Ocean Conservancy

  • and The Ocean Cleanup.

  • The ocean is the heart of the earth and vital not only to our survival but the survival

  • of every living creature.

  • So, be a part of this incredible fundraiser and head over to Teamseas.org and make a donation

  • today!

  • Every dollar donated will remove 1 pound of plastic.

  • Together, we can have a huge impact!

Here is the impact that will happen if we all manage to raise $30 million dollars and

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Removing 30,000,000 Pounds of Trash Will Actually Have This Impact #TeamSeas

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    Summer posted on 2021/10/30
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