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  • Would you survive the first 24 hours in prison?

  • Maybe, depends on if you know what to expect.

  • Don't worry though, we've got you covered in this video.

  • From start to finish we will tell you what the first 24 hours in prison are really like,

  • and what to do if you ever find yourself in this position.

  • Introduction to the prison system starts before the accused is actually locked up, so you

  • can think of this first part as a prequel to what's to come.

  • The criminal needs to be tried and convicted by a jury of their peers, then the sentencing

  • can occur.

  • The inmate hears the wordsyou've been sentenced to prison,” and the next thing

  • they know, they are being prepared for transfer to their new home.

  • The inmate is placed in a transport vehicle to whatever prison will be their final destination.

  • This could be a bus, van, or other secure vehicle which may house other inmates that

  • are going to the lock up as well.

  • Once the prisoner arrives, the intake process begins.

  • This will take up the first few hours of their time in prison.

  • The handcuffed inmate is led by armed guard from the transport to the reception area.

  • This is where things get serious, and a little uncomfortable.

  • First the inmate's identity is checked and put into the system.

  • This is so their every move and action can be recorded while in prison- from what they

  • eat to what cell they are contained in.

  • When the prisoner was first arrested their fingerprints and mugshot were taken during

  • booking and entered into a government database.

  • However, at some prison facilities they will repeat this process for their own records.

  • The inmate's ink covered fingers are pressed against paper and scanned into the prison's

  • documentation system.

  • They then stand motionless in front of a plain backdrop as their mugshot is taken once again.

  • Interestingly, in certain facilities like Rikers Island, the prison will collect visitor's

  • fingerprints as well.

  • Once all of the information is recorded, and the prisoner is in the system, they receive

  • a short orientation of the basic do's and don'ts of the facility.

  • There will be more rules to come later on, but the prison guards just want to make sure

  • everyone is on the same page for this next part, because it is about to get really intimate.

  • It is time for the strip search.

  • At this point the prisoner has probably been standing patiently for quite a while as all

  • the paperwork got done, but now they need to take off all their clothing, and prepare

  • for one of the most uncomfortable moments of their life.

  • The guard who conducts the strip search will not be gentle, but most certainly will be

  • thorough.

  • The guard runs their fingers through the hair of the prisoner to make sure nothing is hidden

  • underneath.

  • Then they open the inmate's mouth wide, and stick their fingers deep into it to look

  • under the tongue and at the back gums.

  • Hopefully the prisoner doesn't have a sensitive gag reflex, because the officer will be in

  • there for a bit.

  • They check the teeth to make sure none of them are false and concealing drugs or anything

  • else.

  • The guard checks the nostrils and ears, then moves to the rest of the body rubbing and

  • patting to make sure there is nothing under the skin.

  • Then the real uncomfortable part comes.

  • The prisoner is told to bend over and prepare for a cavity search.

  • First the genitals are inspected and then the rectum is thoroughly examined to make

  • sure no contraband is hidden within.

  • After the cavity search, the guard checks the legs and feet, does a once over, and then

  • it is time to move to the next part of the intake process.

  • The prisoner gets dressed in their new standard issue clothing, and is brought to the medical

  • examiner for a quick checkup.

  • Vitals are taken, and a brief physical is conducted to make sure the inmate is in decent

  • health.

  • All of this information is recorded and the prisoner is sent to a holding room.

  • At this point the newly admitted prisoner has been in the intake process for a few hours.

  • They receive further information about their stay in the prison by one of the administrators

  • of the facility.

  • All prisons are slightly different, but the intake process between them is normally pretty

  • similar.

  • The length and depth of orientation will vary depending on the institution.

  • Some are thorough and give prisoners all the information they could ever need, othersnot

  • so much.

  • Sometimes the inmate just gets thrown into the mix without so much as a piece of friendly

  • advice.

  • After orientation the inmate receives their bedroll which contains sheets, blankets, towels,

  • and shoes.

  • This is all they will be given besides the prison uniform on their body.

  • It is not uncommon for intake, the strip search, medical exam, and orientation to take 6 to

  • 8 hours.

  • So, a third of the first 24 hours of a prisoner's first day consists of a lot of paperwork and

  • unpleasantness, but that is nothing compared to what's to come.

  • Next the prisoner is led through the facility.

  • They will probably experience some harassment and name calling.

  • This can be a right of passage, and sometimes will be used to intimidate new prisoners and

  • put them in their place.

  • However, some inmates recount an eerie silence as they were brought to their cell.

  • It is unclear which is worse.

  • It also depends on the time of day, because each day in prison tends to be a monotonous

  • copy of the day before.

  • The inmate is probably pretty hungry at this point, but they missed breakfast, and they'll

  • have to wait until the next meal which could still be hours away.

  • Before anything else, they need to drop off their bed supplies at their cell.

  • This is when they will most likely meet their cellmate for the first time.

  • Prisons claim to do a thorough background and personality check to make sure two inmates

  • are compatible, and there is no bad blood between them.

  • But it is unlikely this happens in every intake situation.

  • All that the new prisoner can hope for is that their cellmate is a nice person who wants

  • to be let out early for good behavior.

  • Since the new prisoner doesn't know what to expect, the first interaction could be

  • pretty tense and go multiple ways.

  • The guards may watch for a few moments, but once the door is shut behind them, the new

  • cellmates need to figure it out for themselves.

  • Depending on what time it is, the new inmate might be put to work immediately.

  • If it is time for chores they could be assigned to wash dishes in the kitchen.

  • Or maybe they are sent to the laundry room where they will fold freshly washed linens.

  • Since they haven't shown the guards what they are capable of yet, the new prisoner

  • will probably be asked to do menial tasks until work time is over, and they can move

  • to the next part of their day.

  • If they haven't missed lunch from the long intake process, or if the prison even serves

  • lunch, the new inmate will probably sit alone for their first meal.

  • Hopefully they will be left to eat in peace, but this is not always the case.

  • Depending on the prison and its inhabitants they could be introduced to the hierarchy

  • of the members at their new home.

  • If left alone, the first meal is normally eaten by a new prisoner in silence as they

  • contemplate the predicament they've found themselves in.

  • At some point in the afternoon the inmate will be given recreation time.

  • They are likely halfway through their first 24 hours in prison at this point, and if everything

  • has gone smoothly, they've only been violated by the prison guard during the strip search.

  • Again, it depends on the facility, but oftentimes there will be some sort of outdoor space for

  • the inmates to spend recreational time in.

  • The new inmate probably hasn't made any friends yet, so they may just sit and watch

  • a pickup game or the other prisoners work out.

  • According to inmates who have been interviewed, the first day of recreation time is a little

  • nerve racking.

  • They normally just keep their heads down and wait for it to be over, because the next part

  • of the day is what every prison movie makes out to be the worst place in the whole facility.

  • After recreation time it is shower time.

  • New prisoners might skip this, but it is recommended that they keep good hygiene, so they don't

  • offend anyone else with their body odorespecially their cellmate.

  • The new inmate grabs their towel and goes to the showers with the rest of the prisoners.

  • Most accounts given by those who have been incarcerated say that the shower process is

  • nothing like the entertainment industry makes it out to be.

  • But the new inmate is definitely on guard, especially if it is their first time in the

  • prison system.

  • After shower time, the day is slowly coming to a close, and the prisoner's first 24

  • hours are almost over.

  • There will be dinner, because regardless of the prison, inmates are almost always given

  • some sort of meal at the end of the day.

  • However, the time at which they're fed can vary based on the facility, and some of the

  • meal times are pretty strange.

  • In some prisons dinner can be served as early as 3:00 P.M. meaning that inmates go hungry

  • until breakfast the following morning, which can be as late as 11:00 A.M.

  • Depending on the facility this may be their first meal of the day.

  • The food probably isn't great, and for most first time inmates they will not have the

  • resources necessary to order anything from the commissary during their first 24 hours.

  • So, they are stuck with whatever is on the prison menu for that night.

  • This brings up an awkward problem for the new inmate.

  • At some point they will need to use the bathroom.

  • And if prison food doesn't agree with them, it could be a messy process.

  • This is unfortunate, because the toilet is in the cell, and their cellmate will have

  • nowhere else to go while the new prisoner does their business.

  • It is probably best for the new inmate to ask their cellmate what their preference is

  • for bathroom use, but regardless of how either person feels, when you gotta go, you gotta

  • go.

  • Needless to say, the first time going in front of a new cellmate is going to be pretty awkward.

  • Many federal prison facilities do allow structured time for inmates after dinner.

  • This means that the new inmate may find the end of their day filled by an activity assigned

  • to them by the medical professional that assessed them at intake.

  • These activities could include Alcoholics Anonymous, religious meetings, anger management,

  • or any number of other programs that are organized by the inmates themselves.

  • The newly incarcerated probably wouldn't have joined a group at this point, and may

  • be given the time to watch television or write a letter to whoever is waiting for them on

  • the outside.

  • Again, it would depend on the prison and the inmate themselves, but the first 24 hours

  • are pretty lonely.

  • They most likely don't know anyone in the prison if it is their first offense, and people

  • in prison are not always the most welcoming since they tend to have trust issues.

  • After around 12 to 18 hours in the prison the new inmate is sent back to their cell

  • where the door is locked, and they are left to stare at the underside of the bunk or ceiling.

  • The lights will remain on as the guards do their rounds and check to make sure everyone

  • made it back to their cells okay.

  • Around 11:00 P.M. the lights go out, and the echoes of whispers and snoring fill the cell

  • block.

  • The new inmate probably doesn't know their cellmate well enough to talk to them yet,

  • so they lie in silence.

  • Sleep probably is a long way off, if it even comes at all.

  • Many inmates recount their first night in prison as restless.

  • They toss and turn playing and replaying the events that led to that moment through their

  • mind.

  • In some prisons when it is lights out inmates are to remain silent, but this is not true

  • everywhere.

  • The new inmate might end their first 24 hours in prison listening to conversations being

  • held between cells, or the sobs of other prisoners who are slowly losing their minds.

  • Regardless of which prison a new inmate finds themselves in they probably won't sleep

  • much the first night.

  • They will just lay in the darkness, waiting for the sun to rise the following day, and

  • the next 24 hours of their prison sentence to begin.

  • Now watch “"I Spent My Whole Life In Prison."

  • Or check outPrison is Horrible But Not For the Reason You Think.”

Would you survive the first 24 hours in prison?

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Why First 24 Hours in Prison are the Most Dangerous

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    Summer posted on 2021/10/19
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