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  • Serial killers in the past have been categorized  asorganizedanddisorganized”, with the latter  

  • kind usually being an uneducated maniac prone  to unplanned outbursts of extreme violence.  

  • But the organized, well, these  smart predators plan ahead.  

  • Ted Bundy was one of them, as you shall now see. Bundy sometimes went to great lengths in luring  

  • his victims. He embraced a number of techniques  to evade arrest, and they worked for a long time.  

  • He was the quintessential psychopath. He thought  he was one step ahead of the cops all the time.  

  • You'll hear later how one of his victims  managed to get away after he struck,  

  • but for the most part, if someone got in a car  with Mr. Bundy they were not long for this world

  • It's not certain when he killed first. He might  have murdered a girl named Ann Marie Burr in  

  • 1961 when he was just 14-years old, but that's  inconclusive. He always denied he killed that  

  • girl. Still, murder was likely on his mind back  then. Homicide detectives that worked on his case  

  • agreed that Bundy started young, kidnapping  and killing in his teens and early twenties

  • Those were the years he was trying to  perfect killing without being caught.  

  • He later admitted that he couldn't control  his urges, even though he felt some shame.  

  • Using the third person, but really talking  about himself, he described what it was like  

  • to kill or try and kill in those early days. “He felt horrified by the recognition that  

  • he'd done this, the realization that he  had the capacity to do such a thing or even  

  • attemptthat's a better wordthis kind  of thingHe sat back and swore to himself  

  • that he wouldn't do something like that again.” Bundy also said on tape that he educated himself  

  • in getting away with murder by reading those  gory detective magazines that were so popular  

  • back then. So, with a bit of booze to diminish his  inhibitions, he was ready to become the complete  

  • product, the epitome of the educated killer. He was 27. He knew the time was right. The  

  • victim was 18-year old Karen Sparks. She wasdance student at the University of Washington.

  • On January 4, 1974, Bundy crept into the  basement apartment where she was sleeping.  

  • Just before dozing off, thoughsomething had frightened her

  • Many years later she recalled, “I remember seeing  some guy looking at me and I thought 'Gosh,  

  • you know, maybe it was just a figment of  my imagination because it was so quick.” 

  • She wasn't imagining things. In fact, she  remembered that before she went back to her  

  • apartment she'd been at the laundromat and some  guy kept looking at her. When she looked back,  

  • he turned his head away. This was most likely  Bundy. He'd already become a predator, a kind  

  • of human panther that stalks before striking. When he attacked Sparks that night with a metal  

  • rod, he did so with so much violence that she  should have died. Her injuries were catastrophic,  

  • both external and internal. She thinks the  only reason Bundy stopped attacking her was  

  • that her male roommate in the room next door had  talked in his sleepwhich he did quite often

  • Bundy had followed this girl so he would have  known she had male roommates, young men that  

  • could have easily overpowered him. He likely  knew he was taking a risk. The next victim  

  • had to be alone and this time she had to die. He didn't even wait for an entire month before  

  • he stuck again. The victim also studied at the  University of Washington. Like the first victim,  

  • he didn't so much lure her away, but before we get  to his social techniques, we want to give you an  

  • idea of his modus operandi before that. The victim was Lynda Ann Healy.

  • Bundy entered her room and beat her until  she was unconscious as she was sleeping.  

  • He then dressed her in a pair of blue jeans  and a white blouse, picked her limp body up,  

  • and took off. She was discovered missing because  that morning at 5.30 am her alarm went off and  

  • her roommate noticed that it just kept ringing. Police found blood on her bed and nightgown,  

  • but there wasn't much else in terms of  forensic evidence. Remember Bundy at this  

  • point thought he was smarter than the copsHe wasn't just addicted to killing. The thrill  

  • of the chase afforded him a lot of pleasure. Her skull was later found on a nearby mountain.  

  • It would come to light that her apartment was  just a few blocks from Bundy's. Again, he had  

  • stalked his prey. This time he made sure there  were no burly, male men staying right next to her

  • It was then he started employing charm  and good looks to find his victims,  

  • rather than slaying sleeping women. This time he went over to The Evergreen  

  • State College to hunt. This victim  was 19-year old Donna Gail Manson.

  • He killed those first two women in January and  February, and now it was March. It's hard to  

  • know the full details about how he lured Manson  because of the sad fact that he killed her.  

  • Unlike the few survivors that actually  talked to Bundy and lived to tell the tale,  

  • we can only reconstruct how he manipulated Manson. We know that on March 12 she stood out in the  

  • crowd, wearing a red, orange, and green striped  shirt. She was on her way to a jazz concert  

  • on campus and she never made it there. In April, he killed again, as if trying  

  • to meet a monthly quota. The victim  was 18-year old Susan Elaine Rancourt.

  • It is with her murder that we learn much more  about Bundy's tricks of the trade. There's no  

  • doubt that he knew how to come across asguy people trusted. In Junior high school,  

  • he sold Christmas tree lights to earn some extra  cash. A fellow student from back then recalled,  

  • Ted was the best damned Christmas  tree light salesman I've ever seen.” 

  • He must have used his cool and calm demeanor  to abduct Miss Rancourt. She'd been at Central  

  • Washington State College in Ellensburg and  went missing on her way back to her dorm.  

  • What happened exactly we don't know, but we know  that Bundy had previously tried to unsuccessfully  

  • pick up other girls at the same college. One of them was 21-year old Kathleen Clara  

  • D'Olivo. She told police she saw Bundy struggling  to carry a bag of books. His arm was in a sling  

  • and his hand had a splint on it, which is why  he was struggling. She stopped and asked him  

  • if he was on his way to the libraryHe said, yes, can you please help me

  • Notably, when she chatted with him, she  never turned her back to him. Usually,  

  • as soon as that happened, he would strike his  victim over the head, rendering them unconscious

  • Bundy had dropped a bunch of the books  and was hopelessly trying to pick them up.  

  • D'Olivo later told detectives, “We started  walking and when we came to a bridge,  

  • it was obvious that he wasn't turning off to go to  the library. He then said his car was close by.” 

  • She saw that he had a brown VW Beetle. Feeling  somewhat suspicious of him, she still helped  

  • him carry some books to his car. She then  thought she'd done enough, put the books down,  

  • and started to walk off. He subsequently called  after her, saying he had dropped the car keys and  

  • he couldn't get to them. He asked her for help. She told the cops, “I was cautious at this time.  

  • I mean, even while we were walking, I thought  well, I'm not going to let him get behind me.  

  • I'm going to keep an eye on him.” She did help him look for his keys  

  • but erring on the side of caution she said they  both should step back and look under the car,  

  • rather than bend down in front of himShe outsmarted Bundy right then. They  

  • spotted the keys together, and she walked away  shouting behind her, “Good luck with your arm.” 

  • He must have been furious that some girl  had seen right through him, or at least  

  • been cautious enough to consider  that he might be a sketchy dude

  • It wasn't the only time he failed to get  his prey on that campus. He'd also tried  

  • with a young woman named Jane Curtis. She later told detectives that the man  

  • she met was good-looking, and not someone she  thought was freaky or creepy. He looked like a  

  • guy you could trust, a wholesome, educated type. She said she bumped into him about 9 pm near  

  • the library. She told detectives, “He had this  huge stack of books, like about 8 or 9 books,  

  • and he had a cast on his left armAll  of a sudden, he kind of drops them,  

  • right in the direction that I was walking in.” She offered to help this injured, handsome fella  

  • and politely he told her how grateful he wasThe two then started walking as they were going  

  • in the same direction. She was carrying a bunch  of his books. She later recalled, “He looked  

  • at me strangely. His eyes seemed weird.” That's because he was looking at someone  

  • he thought he was about to kill. He was  looking through her, already imagining  

  • all the warped things he would do with her  dead body. She also noticed that he had  

  • a splint over some of his fingers. He told  her he'd been injured in a skiing accident

  • You see, Bundy made himself look vulnerable  for two reasons. One, he knew young women  

  • would come to his aid, especially because he  was well-spoken and soft on the eyes. Two,  

  • a man with a splint and a cast immediately says  to a woman that he poses no physical threat

  • But Bundy operated with more manipulation  than that. He could have easily said he had  

  • hurt his fingers while building a deck on  his house, or when he lifted some weights,  

  • or when he was fixing a shelf. But  those things, he knew very well,  

  • come across as a bit working  class, a bit too masculine

  • He said skiing because that's what the  well-to-do folks enjoy in their free time.  

  • Serial killers don't ski, at least in the minds of  most people. Back then, the public seemed to labor  

  • under the misapprehension that killers should  look deranged and walk around with tattoos and  

  • shaggy beards. Bundy even drove a feminine kind  of car, perhaps the cutest car on the market.  

  • He was gaming the public's ignorance, and to  some extent, he got one over on the cops, too

  • But he didn't outsmart Curtis. She later told  the police, “That little metal thing over his  

  • finger looked like it had just been taped on.”  Still, she walked over to his car. It was then  

  • he told her to open the passenger door because  he couldn't do it with his arm the way it was

  • She refused to open it, so he did. The first  thing she noticed was that the passenger seat  

  • was missing. That was because it was easier  to push an unconscious woman into the car,  

  • and she wouldn't be seen. Curtis said  the missing seat reallybotheredher.  

  • Something was just not right about this guy. She told detectives, “I have the books in my hand,  

  • and he said, 'Get in.' I said, 'What???!'. He  said, get in and start the car for me. I said,  

  • oh, I can't. He wanted me to get  in through the passenger side.” 

  • Noticing her suspicion, Bundy started to  pretend that his arm was suddenly causing  

  • him a lot of pain. She'd seen enough, thoughShe left him grabbing his fake broken arm.  

  • When she was out of sight, Bundy got  in the car and threw off the cast

  • Again, he must have been furious. Narcissistic  psychopaths don't like being owned. Unfortunately,  

  • Miss Mason fell into his trap. Maybe she turned  her back on him. Maybe she walked a while with his  

  • books. Maybe she fell for the missing key ruseWe'll never know, but she fell for something

  • Even though Bundy had failed on occasions, he  was smart enough to learn from his failures.  

  • He was like a killing machine, a machine-learning  algorithm that gets better each time it  

  • kills. And like an algorithm, Bundy felt no  remorse. The only important thing was succeeding

  • We know he kept using that fake-sling ruse because  when young women went missing people reported to  

  • police that they'd seen a man with his arm insling. Some witnesses also saw a VW Beetle nearby.  

  • On top of that, the sketches of this man police  made were very close to what Bundy looked like.

  • He wasn't just smart, he was also exceptionally  confident. After he'd killed one woman,  

  • he went back to the scene of the crime  to collect some of her belongings.  

  • Police were still everywhere, and  he walked right into a crime scene.  

  • A detective later said, “It was a feat so  brazen that it astonishes police even today.” 

  • This was another reason how he  got away with so many crimes.  

  • He knew his demeanor made him invisible, rather  like the character in the book, “American Psycho.”  

  • Hide in plain sight, must have been his motto. But he changed his system up a little bit.  

  • On other occasions, he swapped the  arm in a sling thing for crutches.  

  • A man that couldn't even walk right was way less  of a danger than someone with a useless arm.  

  • He also carried a briefcase at times, because  hey, killers don't walk around with briefcases

  • This is reminiscent of an educated British  drug smuggler who became the first foreigner  

  • ever to break out of one of Thailand's worst  prisons. Once he got over the wall, he opened  

  • up an umbrella. Getting the umbrella over with  him was very hard, but it was worth the trouble.  

  • When he was asked why he did it, he replied,  “Because escaped prisoners don't use umbrellas.” 

  • Bundy was an expert at exploiting people's  preconceptions. Moreover, when he told people  

  • he worked for theAssistant Director of the  Seattle Crime Prevention Advisory Commission”  

  • who could believe he was a killer? It was truetoo. He actually wrote a booklet aimed at women  

  • which discussed how to avoid dangerous men. His temerity knew no bounds. Time and again  

  • he lured women to his car, one time in broad  daylight. That day he wore a tennis outfit,  

  • because, again, what kind of killer looks  like he could almost pass as Jimmy Connors.

  • Bundy also moved around a fair bit, which made  police work across states very hard before  

  • massive computer databases came into existenceHe was well aware of what we now calllinkage  

  • blindness.” That's when crimes are not connected. He became a law student, which was a great pick-up  

  • line, especially when he had those good lookstoo. Many people who met Bundy on a night out  

  • were literally charmed to death. They only  really became his lovers after they were dead

  • Still, Bundy often returned to his  tried-and-tested being injured canard.  

  • If it's not broken, why fix it, he might  have told himself. One time in Colorado he  

  • approached a victim on crutches and asked  her to help him carry his heavy ski boots.  

  • She was dead soon after. He dumped her and went  back to her decomposed body six weeks later

  • There was one exception, though, the only woman  who ever got in his car and actually survived.  

  • This was nothing short of miraculous, like waking  up next to a lion only to find it's cooked you  

  • breakfast and put your phone on charge. Her name was Carol DaRonch.

  • She was in a shopping mall in Salt  Lake City, Utah, when a good-looking,  

  • smartly dressed man walked up to herHe introduced himself as a detective and  

  • said he needed to know her car license numberBundy, sly as ever, then started looking around  

  • the mall. He told the woman he was just trying  to see where his partner was. She fell for it

  • He told her there'd just been quite a few car  break-ins down in the mall car park. Would  

  • she go down to the car park with him just so he  could ascertain if she'd been one of the victims

  • Phew!' she thought when the two realized her car  had been left alone. But Bundy said he still had  

  • to file a report. It was just a few minutes' drive  to the station. He said she could go with him in  

  • his car, although she became somewhat suspicious  when she saw the police car was actually a VW  

  • Beetle. Beetle in name, Beetle in nature, what  kind of cop drives such a slow car, she thought

  • Unfortunately, DaRonch was quitenaïve person. She had not seen the  

  • ways of the world, having grown  up in a rural Mormon community.  

  • Her parents had always told her to show the  utmost respect towards authority figures

  • She did, however, still think the Beetle was  a bit weird. That's why she asked Bundy to  

  • show some ID. Yet again, the psycho was able  to think on his feet. He quickly flashed his  

  • wallet up to her eyes, and she didn't have the  confidence to tell him she didn't really see much

  • She got in the car. Bundy said strap upand that's when she smelled booze on him.  

  • Now things really didn't seem right. When they were alone on a quiet road, Bundy  

  • stopped the car. DaRonch was now scared. She could  still smell the alcohol vapors wafting around the  

  • car. For a moment there was an awkward silence as  Bundy just looked forward through the windshield

  • He then turned on her, snarling as  he did. He clipped on some handcuffs,  

  • only in his hastiness he fastened them onto the  same hand. DaRonch tried to get out of the car,  

  • at which point Bundy smacked her on  the back of the head with a crowbar.  

  • She screamed, she punched, she kicked outlanding a blow right in Bundy's fiendish face

  • DaRonch got out of the car and left  the bloodied Bundy in her dust

  • One thing she told police later was that he  hardly said a word to her while they were driving.  

  • When being interviewed in prison, Bundy  explained why he was a man of few words  

  • when it came to his victims. He said he  never wanted to know any personal details  

  • about them. That was because it was hard to kill  someone once they'd become a little too real.  

  • This wasn't about empathy, but the fact that  them becoming real would wreck his fantasy

  • According to some experts on serial killersif you ever find yourself up close and trapped  

  • by one of them, start talking, and make sure you  become as real as can be. It probably won't work,  

  • but it's about the best chance you'll have. Now you need to hear the FULL storyHow  

  • They Caught Serial Killer Ted  Bundy.” Or, have a look at...

Serial killers in the past have been categorized  asorganizedanddisorganized”, with the latter  

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Ted Bundy's Creepy Methods for Luring in His Victims

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    Summer posted on 2021/10/15
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