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  • Becoming a doctor requires incredibly long hours of study, years of effort, and for most

  • people in the US, substantial soul-crushing debt.

  • However, one genius teen decided to achieve his medical dreams without going to all that

  • trouble; he just put on a lab coat and started treating patients.

  • It turns out, the state of Florida was less impressed than he had hoped, and ended up

  • laying several charges against him.

  • But how did Dr. Love - yes, really, he went by Dr. Love - fake being a doctor in the first

  • place?

  • And how did he get away with it for so long?

  • We sent our experts as undercover patients to find out, and some of them returned safe

  • and sound to tell their story.

  • Before we start, we know exactly how cliche it is to have a story like this from Florida,

  • and we'd like to emphasize that we are sure there are plenty of normal, well-adjusted,

  • stable people living in The Sunshine State.

  • But those are never the people we come across in our research.

  • From a young age, Malachi (pronounced MA-la-ka-ee) Love-Robinson knew he wanted to help people

  • when he grew up by becoming a doctor.

  • However, the road to medicine apparently seemed pretty long and arduous to the young teen.

  • At some point, he decided, why bother with school when he could just start working in

  • medicine?

  • In fact, why not just open an entire medical center of his own?

  • At 18, Love-Robinson founded and opened the New Birth New Life Medical Center in West

  • Palm Beach, Florida.

  • And while that suspiciously sounds like a health clinic for the Church of Scientology,

  • it was regarded by its unsuspecting patients as a normal medical office.

  • But how can a teen just put on a white coat and a stethoscope and pose as a doctor?

  • Well, apparently Malachi went to great lengths to try to stay one step ahead of the law.

  • Though Malachi called himself Dr. Love, and listed himself as such on the center's website,

  • he added only the initials Ph.D. and HHP-C after his name.

  • Ph.D. holders are not necessarily medical doctors, and HHP-C are initials used by those

  • who work in home health and personal care.

  • He carefully avoided putting the initials “M.D.” anywhere online.

  • So what did Love-Robinson have a Ph.D. in?

  • And why did no one find it suspicious that a baby-faced 18-year-old was claiming to have

  • a doctorate degree and running a medical center?

  • After all, as anyone who has been to grad school will tell you, no one obtains a Ph.D.

  • without getting a few stress wrinkles, gray hairs and anxiety disorders.

  • Well, no one really knows.

  • Because even after Love-Robinson went live on air after his arrest and spoke to journalists

  • - clearly there was no PR person on hand to strongly advise against that particular choice

  • - he refused to disclose what subject he held his Ph.D. in, or where it was from.

  • We have a sneaking suspicion that….the degree might not exist at all.

  • Regarding his age, Dr. Love lied online to make himself older.

  • On HealthGrades.com, where he created a professional profile, he described himself as a 25-year

  • oldwell rounded proffessional”.

  • Given doctors' notoriously terrible handwriting, that type-o didn't set off any alarms.

  • Furthermore, Dr. Love advocated a more alternative approach to medicine.

  • In his profile, he declared that he utilizesphysiological, psychological, and mechanical

  • methods, such as air, water, light, heat, earth to treat patients”.

  • While that sounds like the advice most LA-based $200-an-hourspiritual guidesgive,

  • it's less in line with the specialties of most actual medical doctors.

  • As far as we know, there is noair - water - lightrotation in residency.

  • However, patients kept returning to Dr. Love.

  • After all, how could someone open and operate a whole medical center while being an unlicensed

  • teenager?

  • Patients assumed he must have been adequately trained.

  • Strangely enough, it turns out the clinic ended up setting off alarm bells for law enforcement

  • within a few months.

  • Police sent an undercover officer to the New Birth New Life Medical Center to see Dr. Love.

  • After the officer reported that Love had physically examined him and dispensed medical advice,

  • he was arrested for practicing medicine without a license.

  • However, this arrest didn't stick, initially.

  • Not to mention that many questions remained.

  • For example, how did Dr. Love even get the money to found the New Birth New Life Medical

  • Center?

  • Details on this are unclear, though some of the other charges laid against him might provide

  • an educated guess, as Love-Robinson apparently had no problem operating with other peoples'

  • money and credit histories.

  • In 2015, the same year he was arrested for playing doctor, an 86-year-old patient of

  • Dr. Love accused him of stealing $34,000.

  • Turns out, Love-Robinson was using the money for car payments and credit card loans.

  • We can only assume part of those loans had been used to rent and establish his bogus

  • medical clinic.

  • Malachi was arrested on suspicion of fraud and larceny.

  • Since the concept oflearning from your mistakeswas apparently alien to Love-Robinson,

  • while waiting to see what would happen with his charges, he went ahead and dabbled in

  • some fraud again.

  • This time, he tried to buy a Jaguar, and listed an elderly woman he referred to as his godmother

  • as a co-signer.

  • When employees got suspicious that this elderly not-obviously-related woman who wasn't even

  • present at the car dealership was being offered up to guarantee credit - hey, we didn't say

  • his schemes were foolproof - they decided to run a quick Google check on Love-Robinson.

  • There they found that - surprise! - he had already been arrested at least twice for fraud.

  • When law enforcement checked with the woman listed on the car's paperwork, she said

  • she was a distant relative who was unaware of the car purchase and was certainly not

  • going to help Love-Robinson buy it.

  • Third time's the charm, and this third arrest finally stuck.

  • In March of 2017, Malachi pleaded guilty to two fraud charges, including providing a false

  • statement to obtain credit.

  • The judge, perhaps using the defendant's extremely young age as a mitigating factor-

  • Malachi was 20 at the time of sentencing - suspended nine years of his ten year jail sentence.

  • Love-Robinson also got another break when he took a plea deal to resolve his 14 charges

  • of fake doctoring - and ended up serving less than the three and a half years his charges

  • would require.

  • However, the judge warned Malachi to be on his best behavior from here on out, as any

  • further arrests could land him in jail for a much longer time.

  • When Love-Robinson was finally released from prison in September of 2019, he learned his

  • lesson and decided to change course, follow the right path, get a steady job, rebuild

  • his life....just kidding, he completely ignored the judge's advice and went back to committing

  • fraud for kicks.

  • Malachi started working for United States of Freight, a shipping company in Delray Beach,

  • Florida, as well as a great title for the nextPurgesequel.

  • He slowly came to the obvious realization that his salary was substantially less than

  • the money the company was making as a whole.

  • So a few months in, he started requesting that clients send their payments to his personal

  • bank account instead of to the company account.

  • He had clients PayPal or Venmo his personal checking account, while in some other circumstances

  • he set up fake company accounts - such as forNational Logistics Division LLC

  • - which authorities realized were tied to his name and home address.

  • Law enforcement officials estimate he amassed over $10,000 to his personal account in this

  • manner.

  • When Daniel O' Sullivan, Malachi's boss, became suspicious over missing payments, he

  • confronted Malachi in private.

  • Love-Robinson apologized profusely, and said he would correct the situation because he

  • didn't want to go to jail”.

  • While that sentiment is understandable, it did very little to appease the boss he had

  • stolen from.

  • Malachi insisted he would pay back the money he had taken; however, those payments never

  • materialized.

  • O'Sullivan went to the police, who arrested Malachi at the end of 2020.

  • So why does Love-Robinson engage in such substantial fraud, living out thisCatch Me If You

  • Canlifestyle?

  • Moreover, why has he done it so many times knowing there's no possible way he can evade

  • authorities forever, while also failing to truly admit any wrongdoing?

  • After all, he told journalists and others that he never actually pretended to be a doctor,

  • just a naturopath.

  • However, multiple patients reported that Dr. Love had presented himself as an M.D., and

  • even had those initials at the end of his name on his clinic door.

  • Malachi also repeatedly claims to have a ph.D., though he refuses to tell anyone, including

  • reporters and investigators, in what field he holds one.

  • The first time Love-Robinson was arrested, authorities took him in for psychiatric observation,

  • as required by Florida's Baker Act.

  • After all, Malachi seemed to have completely lost touch with reality, and was doubling

  • down on it to authorities in a way that seemed...well, crazy.

  • The Baker Act allows for the involuntary examination and institutionalization of an individual

  • for up to 72 hours if they display signs of mental illness that may be dangerous.

  • Judges, law enforcement officers, and doctors can all initiate institutionalization under

  • the Baker Act.

  • So we know Malachi at least came off as impaired enough to warrant forced examination for mental

  • illness.

  • However, doctors couldn't find anything wrong with him mentally.

  • One of his first lawyers also explored a mental health defense, but while he tried to find

  • a way to make it stick by giving the defendant a possible diagnosis, the doctors he hired

  • still couldn't find anything wrong.

  • Malachi himself seems to reject any hints of mental health issues.

  • He told a WBPF-TV25 reporter, “this story was broadcast everywhere, like I'm some

  • insane maniac that's just out here doing crazy things.”

  • Love-Robinson himself had a much simpler explanation for his actions: in a broadcast interview

  • from prison, he stated, “I was a young kid that got overly ambitious and just said to

  • hell with the rules and regulations”.

  • So there you go kids.

  • Just follow your dreams!

  • Except make sure you're not doing anything that could land you in jail or harming anyone

  • by pretending to be a medical expert and doctor.

  • Yes, we're looking at you Gwyneth Paltrow.

  • Now that you've learned the story of Malachi Love-Robinson, Florida's infamous teen doctor,

  • what's the craziest fraud case you've ever heard of?

  • Let us know in the comments below!

  • In the meantime, maybe spend a few minutes looking up your physician's credentials,

  • and then watch this video right here, or the one up next!

Becoming a doctor requires incredibly long hours of study, years of effort, and for most

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How Fake Teen Doctor Fooled The World

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    Summer posted on 2021/10/13
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